Category: jbogmryd

New age therapy

first_imgNew age therapyOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today The Employers’ Forum on Age has devised a ‘toolkit’ to help employersage-proof their policies. Royal Bank of Scotland has tried it out and sharedthe results with Sarah Jane NorthIn just over three years’ time, age discrimination in the workplace will beillegal. New laws will require employers to remove age specifications from jobadvertisements and application forms (as some naively believe), and conduct acomplete overhaul of all employment policies, including recruitment, training,management development, rewards and benefits. Complacent employers who bury their heads on this issue could findthemselves with a massive compensation bill – an estimated £193m in the firstyear of the new regulations becoming law, according to the Employers’ Forum onAge (EFA). Few employers may be aware of the scale of the age discrimination problem.But in a survey conducted by the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development(CIPD) last year, 14 per cent of UK staff said they believe they have beentreated unfairly because of their age at some point in their working lives. Ifall of these people were to take a claim under the new laws, the compensationbill would total a staggering £73bn. The EFA is calling on employers to take action now by age-proofing theiremployment policies. In conjunction with a group of household-name employers,it has devised a toolkit to ensure employment decisions and policies are basedon ability, not age. “It is essential all businesses carry out a policy review to see whereage bias might be lurking,” said EFA chairman Howard Davies at thetoolkit’s launch in April. “Many employers are under the impression that the 2006 agediscrimination legislation will require them to make only minor adjustments totheir recruitment and retirement policies. They are in for a shock. “We hope that the EFA toolkit will be a catalyst for change, helping totake businesses beyond mere compliance with the new laws to the forefront ofbest practice,” he added. Playing a leading role in designing, developing, piloting and implementingthe toolkit has been the Royal Bank of Scotland Group. The toolkit, One StepAhead, consists of 20 checklists covering a range of essential employmentissues, including recruitment, training, promotion, harassment, retirement andredundancy. It is designed to help employers view their policies through an‘age microscope’ to identify where age bias may currently impact on employmentpolicy or practice, and to suggest options and ways to introduce age neutralityacross the business prior to the new legislation. “Using the toolkit has been an invaluable exercise in helping usidentify areas that we needed to work on. This positions us well to maximisethe business benefits that we so clearly see from having an age-diverseworkforce and from recognising diversity in our customer base,” said RBSgroup diversity manager Amanda Jones at the launch. Using the toolkit, RBS identified 12 of the 20 areas of review suggested ashaving particular relevance across all the group’s businesses, and these becamethe priority areas for review. They included recruitment, training,people-friendly policies and management issues. The review was managed by Jones, reporting directly to the group HRdirector, thereby ensuring executive level buy-in to the review and theauthority to fully engage with each of the business divisions. RBS tailored the EFA toolkit to its own in-house processes, which meant thatmanagers were familiar with the reporting procedure and reassured of the valueof their participation, and guaranteed that they would act on the results.Furthermore, it ensured consistency in evaluating their responses. Jones designed a ratings matrix to match the existing risk assessmentsystem, then used this to score activities that had been identified aspriorities for review. This scoring system allowed Jones’ team to collate the results according toeach business division, identifying as they went areas of best practice andsharing these across the group. The analysis revealed: – A need for greater diversity (including age diversity) training at alllevels – The need to improve monitoring and measurement of age diversity. Thepolicy review indicated that measurement was ‘often possible but not alwayscarried out’ – The need to offer a more flexible retirement policy – A requirement to ensure age-neutral performance management (appraisal) – Evidence that some parts of the HR department and senior managers wereunaware of the forthcoming age discrimination legislation and that others wereunder the impression that the legislation would just protect older workers.They were not aware that future age laws would cover employees and applicantsof all ages – Good practice in a number of divisions and policy areas – That some current practices or policies might need to be ‘justified’ underthe future legislation. For example, the school leaver programme targets aspecific age group and under the new legislation would require a ‘demonstrableand objectively justified business case’ – The need to improve communications across the group on age diversity A clear timetable for action was drawn up, with each area of actionprioritised. Among the next steps RBS plans to take will be: – The development of a group-wide diversity training strategy – A further review of management information systems with a view toincorporating regular reporting on core measurements (as suggested by the EFAtoolkit). Specific accountability and reporting structures will be put in placeto ensure all business units are aware of their status with respect to agediversity – The development of a group-wide diversity communication strategy – The development of proposals to offer employees greater flexibility forretirement. Proposals are expected to be submitted later this year – A review of initiatives that target specific age groups (for examplerecruitment programmes) to decide if a justifiable business case exists – The development of an action plan to ensure that all issues identified inthe audit are acted on. “We have been a core member of the EFA for a number of years and seethem very much as a strategic partner in devising, developing and deliveringour diversity strategy. We saw the toolkit as something we could grab hold ofand help to promote and develop,” says RBS diversity manager Nick Goss. “The toolkit helps to demonstrate that age diversity is really anopportunity rather than a threat. Society’s demographics are changing rapidlyand this is reflected in the needs of our employees. “The toolkit is very flexible, not prescriptive, and can bend and mouldto the requirements of different organisations.” Aerospace giant BAA, another EFA member, also trialled the toolkit anddiscovered areas it too needed to tackle. The audit exposed a lack of understandingamong managers of the subtle nature of age discrimination. It also challengedthe accepted view that to reach positions of influence an employee had to be atthe top end of the age range. The audit also identified how processes topinpoint potential discrimination had only focused on minority groups. After gathering responses from across the company to the 10 Essential AgeProofing Questions (see box), HR developed an action plan to make the necessarychanges to policy and practice over the next two years, with all changesaligned to the overall HR strategy and business strategy. The plan includesmaking progress on the design of policies to allow post-retirement working, anda move to end compulsory retirement ahead of the 2006 deadline. Temporary employment specialist Manpower also took part in devising thetoolkit and is now using it to review its own company age policy and retirementplans. “Our review will further ensure that the best workers in the labourmarket are recruited on the basis of skills and ability, not age,” saysRuth Hounslow, head of public affairs. The company has already broken several age stereotypes at its call centre inSelkirk in Scotland. The average age of people working in call centres is just24; at Selkirk, it is 36, and the average age of team and senior managers is41. The centre also employs a greater proportion of older workers than theaverage – one in seven is aged over 50; a third are over 40 and two-thirds areover 30. In an industry dominated by part-time female workers, more than 50 percent of Selkirk’s staff are male, and where the industry averages a horrendousturnover rate of between 40 and 50 per cent, at Selkirk it is virtuallynon-existent, standing at less than 1 per cent. 10 essential age-proofing questionsThe questions are designed to revealissues of possible concern. If you answer ‘no’ to any of them, the EFA says youshould urgently consider prioritising policy review in this area. A ‘no’ mayimply the organisation is vulnerable under the forthcoming legislation. If youanswer ‘yes’, you should be able to provide evidence to back your answer –written, statistical or otherwise – as you may be required to provide suchevidence at tribunal.– Can you justify the use of specified periods of experience(for example ‘two years’ experience required’) in your job advertisements?– Have you removed age as a selection criterion for redundancy?– Do you have evidence that all age groups have access toflexible working opportunities?– Can you provide evidence that salaries and benefits are notage-related?– Are you able to monitor by age the drop-out rate fromdifferent stages of your selection process?– Are you able to collate and analyse information from exitinterviews by age?– Is the same contractual retirement age applied to everyone inthe organisation?– Are you aware of different sickness absence rates amongdifferent age groups?– Do you assess the intake of your graduate, fast-track ormanagement development programmes for potential age bias?– Can you monitor poor performance and age profile thoseindividuals?Source: EFA Comments are closed. 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Gyroresonant interactions between the radiation belt electrons and whistler mode chorus waves in the radiation environments of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn: A comparative study

first_imgIn the current study we perform a comparative analysis of the gyroresonant interactions of whistler mode waves with radiation belt electrons in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. Our primary goal is to evaluate the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions with chorus waves and determine whether chorus waves can produce net acceleration or net loss of radiation belt electrons on the outer planets. The ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of the pitch angle and energy resonant scattering. We present a comparison of statistical maps of the ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency for Jupiter, Saturn and Earth in terms of radial distance and latitude. Preliminary maps of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio and 2D simulations of pitch angle and energy diffusion using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) indicate that the Kronian plasma environment is not likely to support as efficient gyroresonant interactions with whistler mode chorus waves as in the Terrestrial or Jovian environments. Inefficiency of the local acceleration by whistler mode waves in the Kronian environment raises important questions about the origin of the relativistic electrons in the Saturn’s radiation belts. Two-dimensional diffusive simulations of local acceleration and loss to the atmosphere using the VERB code confirm previous suggestions that the acceleration of electrons may be very efficient in the outer radiation belt of Jupiter. However, sensitivity simulations also show that the result of the competition between acceleration and loss in the Jupiter’s magnetosphere strongly depends on the currently unknown latitudinal distribution of chorus waves that will be provided by the upcoming Juno mission. If waves extend to high latitudes, it is likely that the loss rates due to whistler mode waves will exceed energization rates.last_img read more

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City Administration Moves Forward With Plans for New Fire Station

first_imgAt the recommendation of state and local officials, the Ocean City Fire Department station at 29th Street and West Avenue will close by April 15 with the building to be demolished prior to Memorial Day Weekend.There will be no interruption in protection and service to residents and guests as firefighters will operate from a temporary station in the same part of Ocean City.The city will use money from a $1.5 million pool of post-Sandy capital ordinances and reimbursements to build a new structure with a ground floor that will house the same apparatus and equipment as the old firehouse. A second floor will include a new living area for the firefighters stationed there. The city continues to negotiate with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on a reimbursement for this work at the facility damaged by Superstorm Sandy.The construction represents the final phase of a project that began in 2014 with the award of an original design contract. The process was delayed when construction bids came back at a level that would be irresponsible to taxpayers.As always, dial 911 for emergencies and 609-525-9182 for non-emergency calls to the department during this project.last_img read more

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Fishing Report: 7/17/20

first_imgBlowfish Hello! This is the OCNJ Daily fishing report. This report will give you the where, when and how of fishing our local waters. We hope this information will help you catch the big one!Suggested bait and tackle in this report can be obtained at any of the local fishing shops.The “What” BlowfishHere is a list of fish (some common, some not as common) found in New Jersey waters: Blowfish, Bluefish, Croaker, Flounder, Kingfish, Ling, Oyster Toad Fish, Perch, Sea Bass, Sea Robin, Shad Sharks, Sheepshead, Skate, Spot, Striper(Striped bass), Triggerfish, Weakfish, Black Drum, Red Drum and many others.The “Where”Some suggestions for locations in Ocean City:Beach fishing (where allowed), the 5th St jetty, Corsons Inlet and the north end of the island near the Longport Bridge are excellent locations.Bridge/Pier fishing: Longport Bridge fishing pier, 9th St Bridge fishing piers (there are 4).Bay fishing: 12th St pavilion, and any street end that is open to the public.Note: Tide-forecast.com or any reliable tide app on your smart phone will help you fish at the right time of day. I suggest a few hours before and after high tide.Back BayThe water temp has warmed (mid 70’s currently), which brings more variety of fish into our local waters. Anglers are reporting lots of activity!FlukeUsually the Summer Flounder have begun to migrate to deeper waters by now, but the catch is strong in the back bays still. Lots of Flounder being taken, with some in the 5 – 9 pound range this week! Keeper Striped Bass and Weakfish are bending rods around the inlets in the evenings. Kingfish continue to be plentiful. Bluefish, Sea Robins, and those ugly Oyster Toad Fish are present in our local waters. With the water warming, anglers are now seeing more Triggerfish and Sheepshead.The main take right now are Flounder.  Minnows, cut squid, and bucktails (white or pink) with Gulp tails are all good working bait.  Bluefish in the 2  pound range are still hooking up in the bay on cut bait. Early morning and night  fishermen have still been hooking Striped Bass using surface lures (I prefer Yosuri poppers) on the sod banks, and live Eel in deeper water. Triggerfish have been biting on fiddler crabs or squid. Sheepshead can be caught using  squid as bait with smaller (#4 or #6) hooks, mostly around the bridges.The Blue Crab catch is heating up, with more keeper size crabs being hauled in. *Maryland Style crabs are always good, but I prefer cleaned live, then sautéed in oil and garlic!Good spots to catch all these fish mentioned is the Longport Bridge fishing pier, Corsons Inlet on the south end of the island and one of the fishing piers on the Rt 52 Causeway. The fishing pier at the end of 12th St is also a nice little spot.Piers and BridgesAs the water has now warmed (currently mid 70’s), a good variety of fish are being taken from the bridges. Flounder, Blues, Sea Robin, Oyster Toad fish, Triggerfish and Sheepshead were all hooked this week. Flounder, Triggerfish, and Sheepshead can be caught using squid or minnows as bait on smaller hooks (#4 or #6 hooks), and also pink or white bucktails. Cut bait (bunker or squid) for Blues and Sea Robins.SurfKingfishKingfish continue to be kings of the beach!  2020 is shaping up to be as good or better a season for Kingfish than 2019 – which was a really good Kingfish season. Many are being taken in the 1 – 2 pound range. Bloodworms on an over/under rig are the bait of choice. * Note: Try fresh Kingfish Tacos!Stripers are being caught in the surf and (more often) in the inlets – usually in the evenings.  Fresh clam is the bait of choice. Sunrise and sunset, at the top of the tide is the best time.The Weakfish catch has been strong in the surf. Weakfish will bite on bloodworms (like Kingfish). They are a beautiful fish, and very good eating! A recent surprise has been the sight of Blowfish hooking up. Island Beach State Park has been the hotspot, but this week saw Blowfish being caught in the surf along the south Jersey beaches.The sun is shining, the water is warm, so get out there and fish!last_img read more

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Duchy reveals plans for first bakery

first_imgOrganic food company Duchy Originals is to open its first bakery on 14 June producing new ranges including organic Cornish pasties and sweet and savoury tarts and flans (British Baker, 28 Oct. pg 6).The Cornish bakery, which was originally scheduled to open in April, will sell mainly to Waitrose and Budgens, and has been discussing a deal to supply Sainsbury’s, said a Duchy Originals spokeswoman. The bakery’s initial range will include steak and cheese & onion pasties; bacon & cheese and cheese & onion flans; and chocolate, lemon and fruit tarts. The plan is to double production within two years, in part through the addition of pastry products. Duchy Originals declined to give details of initial production capacity. The initial workforce of 14 will include 11 people on the two production lines. The bakery will use some ingredients sourced locally, including meat for pasties from local butcher James Kitto. It will also use some ingredients, including preserves and bacon, sourced from the suppliers of other Duchy products, a spokeswoman said. The Duchy Originals Foods Bakery in Launceston, Cornwall, is owned by the Prince of Wales’ estate, which up to now has subcontracted production of all its food and drink products to suppliers including La Fornaia and Walkers Shortbread.Duchy Originals was set up by Prince Charles in 1990 to sell oat biscuits to fund his charitable foundation.last_img read more

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News story: Have your say on the UK’s future trade negotiations

first_imgAt the launch event International Trade Secretary Liam Fox said: These consultations are about how we position ourselves as Global Britain. To build the export markets, investment opportunities and trading relationships of the future. Trade affects us all – whether it is through the prices and availability of product on our supermarket shelves, to the resources available for our public services, to the jobs and investment on which we all rely.  You can now have your say on our prospective trade negotiations. Take part in the online consultations These agreements could: enable increased trade and investment secure access for UK exporters to the key markets of today and the future give consumers access to a greater range of products at lower prices make the UK more innovative, competitive and prosperous. Take part in the online consultationscenter_img Watch our video to find out moreHow will the consultations work?The benefits of trade agreements Boosting economic growth in the UK by encouraging more competition, investment and innovation. Contributing to global prosperity, by boosting economic growth in countries that the UK does business with through international supply chains. Increased global prosperity supports social cohesion within and between countries, and in turn political stability, which is one of the building blocks of our collective security. Some trade agreements can particularly benefit developing countries – trade can be a vital tool in boosting developing countries’ economic growth and reducing poverty, while also providing UK consumers and businesses with goods at competitive prices. Trade is also an instrument of foreign policy and some countries use trade policy (including trade agreements) to advance standards and values. Trade agreements aim to reduce trade barriers between countries. Barriers can be taxes charged on goods as they cross borders (tariffs), or different rules and regulations that can add to trade costs (non-tariff measures). Trade and investment barriers make it more difficult and costly to trade or invest overseas. Reducing these barriers can help the flow of goods, services and money for investment between countries, and help businesses to access markets they previously weren’t able to. Consumers can benefit from access to a greater variety of products at lower prices.Trade agreements do not prevent governments from regulating as they see fit, and they also do not require governments to privatise any services. The UK Government is committed to maintaining our high standards for consumers, workers and the environment, and to protecting our public services, in any future trade agreements that we conclude. For the first time in over 40 years, the UK will be able to determine who we trade with and the public will have a say on the terms of these trading agreements.We want to maximise our trade opportunities globally and across all countries – both by boosting our trading relationships with old friends and new allies, and by seeking a deep and special partnership with the EU.In 6 month’s time, the UK will have the opportunity to begin negotiating, signing, and ratifying Free Trade Agreements to bring them into force from January 2021.In preparation for this, the UK Government is consulting with members of the public, businesses, trade experts, and any other interested organisations to help inform this work. This initial consultation process will inform our overall approach to our future trade relationship.There are 4 online consultations: Consultation on trade negotiations with the United States Consultation on trade negotiations with Australia Consultation on trade negotiations with New Zealand Consultation on the UK potentially seeking accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)last_img read more

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Wasabi to open Japanese-inspired bakery in Cambridge

first_imgSocial media has been set alight with talk of ‘the Asian answer to Greggs’, which will open in Cambridge this Saturday (15 July).Owned by sushi chain Wasabi, which runs 50 restaurants and sushi bars in the UK, the new bakery, Soboro, will serve Japanese and Korean pastries, as well as some “British favourites”, in The Lion Yard shopping centre.It will also offer sandwiches, coffee and soups at the 75-cover site.Darren Church, Wasabi business development manager, said: “We believe that British customers love to try anything different so long as it’s tasty and exciting – and that’s exactly what we have with Soboro.“The freshness and the quality of the offer is something we are confident will appeal to a significant proportion of the breakfast and lunchtime market. It’s not like anything else on the high street right now.”Soboro is the name of a Korean sweet bun.last_img read more

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New JJ Cale Compilation Of Previously-Unreleased Material Coming Spring 2019, Listen To Lead Single, “Chasing You”

first_imgThe first posthumous compilation album of new recordings from the late JJ Cale is set to arrive later this year. Titled, Stay Around, the forthcoming album will feature 15 previously-unreleased original songs (and one cover) when it arrives on April 26th via Because Music.Stay Around will be the first posthumous album release from the Cale estate since the guitarist/singer died at the age of 74 in July 2013. The 15 tracks to be featured on the album were reportedly compiled by Cale’s widow, Christine Lakeland Cale, with assistance from his longtime manager, Mike Kappus. All 15 recordings on the album have never been released, and were written by Cale with the exception of a song called, “My Baby Blues”, which was penned by Lakeland Cale (recorded with JJ) back in 1977, the year they met. According to his widow, “My Baby Blues” should help to bring “everything full-circle.”Related: Remembering Leon Russell On The 2nd Anniversary Of His Death“‘Roll On’, the title track of Cale’s last studio album, was 34 years old,” Kappus mentioned in a statement about his old recordings. “He would burn me CDs of demos, and one time I said, ‘You’ve got two good albums on here.’ Some of the tracks had detailed information, some of them had nothing. Some songs might be a full band of his buddies, others were him playing everything. These were songs he really did intend to do something with because they were carried to his typical level of production for release.”The forthcoming album’s lead single, “Chasing You”, was released back on January 31st. The road trip-worthy single was written in JJ Cale’s living room with the band set up while rehearsing for his 2009 tour. Fans can listen to the song via its new music video below–which even features Cale himself as viewers are taken on a journey through cities across America while on tour with the famous rock guitarist back when he was still alive.JJ Cale – Chasing You[Video: JJ Cale]Fans can click here for more information on how to purchase Stay Around ahead of its April 26th release.JJ Cale – Stay Around Stay Around Tracklist:1. Lights Down Low2. Chasing You3. Winter Snow4. Stay Around5. Tell You ‘Bout Her6. Oh My My7. My Baby Blues8. Girl Of Mine9. Go Downtown10. If We Try11. Tell Daddy12. Wish You Were Here13. Long About Sundown14. Maria15. Don’t Call Me JoeView Album Tracklisting[H/T GuitarWorld]last_img read more

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Another climate change concern: Forced migration

first_imgClimate change is a “risk factor” for forced migration, like in the European refugee crisis, experts on health, migration, and disaster relief told a symposium Thursday, urging development of early warning systems and robust government responses to ease the effects of climate-related problems.Jennifer Leaning, the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said that, although controversial in the 1990s, the idea that climate change can play a role in sparking mass migrations like the those in the world today has become more widely accepted.The extent of climate change’s contribution to the 66 million people on the move globally remains imprecise, but several experts said it is nonetheless important to include it in analyses of why people emigrate, what happens to them during their journeys, and how that affects their health.Ashish Jha, K.T. Li Professor of International Health and director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, described climate change’s impact on migration as akin to the effects of smoking and heart disease. It’s known that smoking is a risk factor for heart disease, but its contribution to any particular case compared with other factors, like diet, exercise, and heredity, is difficult to quantify. That doesn’t prevent physicians from warning against cigarettes, however.Scientists predict that climate change will not just warm the planet but also foster weather extremes, intensifying storms, and thereby making crop-killing droughts and flooding rains more common, heat waves hotter and longer, and sea levels high enough to threaten coastal dwellers, particularly during extreme tides such as those during hurricanes and other coastal storms.Leaning, director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, said that good governance is a major mitigating factor in climate shifts, though she also said even countries like the United States, that have both wealth and effective governments, are at risk for the most extreme storms, like hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. The torrential, enduring rains from Harvey, she said, overwhelmed even Houston’s modern, effective governance, while Maria’s impact on the Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, could lead to significant migration to the mainland.Leaning cited media reports that indicated thousands of Puerto Ricans had escaped to the mainland before the storm and that Maria’s destruction had so affected basic needs such as food, shelter, and employment that tens of thousands more — possibly even hundreds of thousands — could follow.“Climate change is already beginning to have an effect,” says Ashish Jha, director of the Global Health Institute. “By all measures, it’s only going to get worse.”Unlike other parts of the world, where the mass migration of one ethnic group can cause competition for resources and foster ethnic tension, in this case, she said, the U.S. East Coast is wealthy and has an existing Puerto Rican population, so she didn’t expect the influx to become a strain on the whole economic and governmental system.Leaning made her comments during a keynote talk at a half-day symposium called “Climate Change, Migration and Health” and sponsored by the Harvard Global Health Institute. The event, held at the Radcliffe gymnasium, also featured panel discussions on the topic and remarks by Jha.Leaning said that climate issues likely played a part in sparking the ongoing European refugee crisis, through a prolonged drought in northern Syria that devastated the agricultural livelihood of people there. Its effects were exacerbated by an inadequate government response that caused a million Syrians to migrate internally to cities where the majority population was ethnically different. Those cities, already stressed by the arrival of 1.5 million refugees from Iraq, were also the sites for rising unrest that led to Syria’s civil war, which caused millions to flee the country.Under current international law, Leaning said, those leaving their homelands for environmental reasons wouldn’t be considered refugees, a legal status reserved for those driven out because of race, religion, nationality, or politics. The label also doesn’t cover the many millions displaced from their homes who don’t cross international borders, but who nonetheless need help.Economic and organizational pressures stemming from the new arrivals can foster local unrest and even conflict. Warfare confined to a single country is particularly worrisome because it isn’t regulated by international strictures and is more prone to atrocities such as ethnic cleansing, war crimes, and genocide, Leaning said.“I won’t go into the way in which the world is awash with wars, and awash with weapons, and awash with young people who don’t have a sense of the future. We all know and understand this,” Leaning said. “It’s quite a direct link” to climate change. “It’s not the only link, and it’s not causal link, but there are associations between climate change, migration, entering alien spaces, conflict in those alien spaces, and then armed conflict.“We’re very much concerned with how you prevent these wars, which is why we’re cycling back to climate change.”Early warning systems, Leaning said, can give governments and international actors a chance to intervene before a dispute turns hot. Famine early warning systems are most advanced, and others — such as identifying atrocities — are being developed.Health care, human migration, and climate change are critical international concerns, Jha said. Health care constitutes a significant part of the U.S. economy. Migration has fed reactionary movements that, among other things, just led to election of far-right members to the German parliament for the first time since World War II. In addition, he said, the United States has just witnessed three major storms, each large enough to be historic in its own right, in line with climate predictions that they will become more frequent and intense.“Climate change is already beginning to have an effect,” Jha said. “By all measures, it’s only going to get worse.” McCarthy urges scientists to raise their voices on climate change Related Fighting words from former EPA leader The panelists discussed care for migrants and the need for action, even amid continued uncertainty about what moves will prove most effective. Elizabeth Donger, a research associate at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, said it’s important to think hard about what happens to refugees when they arrive in their new homes. The practice of sending people to temporary camps is reflective of an expectation that their stay will also be temporary, which experience says is hardly always the case, Donger said.Statistics show that the typical stay of a refugee is 26 years, which makes it important that host nations don’t just warehouse them and instead provide education, job training, and work permits that allow them to become productive members of society.Harvard Humanitarian Initiative Director Michael VanRooyen, professor of emergency medicine and of global health and population, and director of the Emergency Department at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said the impact of climate-related disasters will likely fall most heavily on the world’s poorest nations, which lack the resources of countries like the United States to respond.“We know there’s a direct link between the impact of disasters and human vulnerability,” VanRooyen said.Though more study is needed to understand better the climate-related risks to health — whether through famine, war, or storms — VanRooyen warned that uncertainty is not an excuse for inaction. Centuries of experience, after all, have shown where disasters are most likely to hit.“We work pretty closely with the Philippines, for example, and we know, predictably, the Philippines is going to be hammered by 25 major storms a year, and two or three of them will be epic in nature,” VanRooyen said. “Just because we’re uncertain doesn’t mean we shouldn’t act. Just because we can’t quantify it doesn’t mean it’s not real.”last_img read more

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The problems with LGBTQ health care

first_img National strategies are needed to help control spiraling costs, panel says, and examples exist Drug story When disease strikes, gender matters The solution, according to panelists at a session sponsored by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, involves gathering more data to help identify specific health needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) population, along with educating health professionals so they better understand that there are differences in care needs, and that ignoring them can do damage.“There’s a ton of research, including by my colleagues here at Harvard — David Williams in particular — showing that experiencing discrimination is associated with a whole range of negative health outcomes,” said Logan Casey, research associate at the Harvard Opinion Research Program. “So if you’re experiencing this discrimination on such a widespread scale and it’s having all these negative health impacts and then on top of that you’re not going to a doctor … that is going to compound the effects of discrimination.”The forum, “Health in the LGBTQ Community: Improving Care and Confronting Discrimination,” featured Casey; Kenneth Mayer, co-chair and medical research director of the Fenway Institute; and Sari Reisner, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard Chan School. Wednesday’s panel was moderated by Joe Neel, science correspondent and deputy senior supervising science editor at NPR. It was co-sponsored by the Harvard Chan School and NPR.The poll by the Harvard Chan School, NPR, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation examined the experience of discrimination in several populations, including LGBTQ adults. It found that discrimination is a common feature in their lives, with 57 percent saying they’ve been subject to anti-LGBTQ slurs and 53 percent to offensive comments about their identity.,In addition, 51 percent said they or a friend or family member who is also an LGBTQ person have experienced violence. The same percentage said they’d experienced sexual harassment, while 57 percent said they’d received threats or been subject to nonsexual harassment. In addition, just over a third, 34 percent, said they’d been harassed verbally in a bathroom.“We see these extremely high numbers of interpersonal violence being reported by members of the LGBTQ community,” Casey said.Within this population, Casey said, there are further disparities based on race. Black LGBTQ people had higher rates than whites of discrimination on the job and in interactions with police, and more often avoided calling police when in need because they were concerned about discrimination. Infectious disease rates are higher as well, Reisner said, with an estimated 50 percent of black transgender women suffering greatly from HIV.Awareness of the differing health needs of the LGBTQ community is rising, panelists said. The National Institutes of Health has made the community a priority population for research into health disparities, which include an increased risk of adverse health outcomes at two to five times that of the general population, according to Reisner.Panelists agreed that more data is needed on the health care needs of the LGBTQ population. They said questions about sexual orientation and gender identity should be added routinely to surveys to help illuminate those needs.Mayer said one of the biggest hurdles this population faces involves how unprepared most medical professionals are to take care of them — despite a push to improve the health care industry’s “cultural competence” and better understand the everyday lives and pressures on ethnic and minority patients.“The biggest challenge is that the health care system is woefully unprepared to take appropriate care of LGBTQ people,” Mayer said. “It’s a dawning idea that needs to gain traction, that there’s also a whole field of sexual-gender minority health that providers need to have an understanding of.”,Though providers often are reluctant to ask patients questions about sexual preference for fear of embarrassing them, Mayer said a recent survey said that 90 percent of patients don’t share that fear. A simple open question on registration forms — “Do you have sex with men, women, or both?” — can give a physician information and help establish communication that might prove important in understanding and treating health needs.One reason for optimism, said Neel, is that medicine has “a learning attitude,” meaning many physicians — once they become aware that a need exists — extend effort to better care for patients, whatever their background.Mayer said doctors may be motivated to educate themselves if it is emphasized that failing to ask about and consider sexuality isn’t just a missed opportunity to provide better care, but could be a prescription for worse care.“I’m optimistic,” Mayer said. “The hook, and it’s the right hook for providers, is you’re going to do a better job providing patient care. Did you really go into this profession to do a bad job? I think if we can get people to understand that, that will help turn things around.” Sorrow, frustration, hope in opioid crisis Experts in Harvard Chan School discussion say research, treatment need to be more sensitive to differences between men and women Nearly a sixth of LGBTQ adults have experienced discrimination at the doctor’s office or in another health care setting, while a fifth say they have avoided seeking medical care out of fear of discrimination, according to a recent poll.That combination, in a population that commonly experiences discrimination and even violence in their day-to-day lives, can lead to a cascade of health ills, experts say. People who experience discrimination, for example, have been shown to have an increased risk of heart disease, and that risk can be raised further by skirting routine medical care. Harvard panels share experiences, ideas in health, policy, law enforcement Relatedlast_img read more

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