Category: meoyzmsp

Commercial fishing vessel as research vessels in the Antarctic – requirements and solutions exemplified with a new vessel

first_imgThe climate-induced changes presently seen in the ecosystems of the Antarctic region require a precautionary approach with respect to the human use of these ecosystems. In particular, resource harvesting requires enough basic knowledge, as well as adequate monitoring, to avoid unintended impacts on the harvested stocks and the associated ecosystem. Due to the vastness and remoteness of the Antarctic region, research vessel capacity is not readily available for conventional coverage of harvested stocks and their ecosystems. This paper describes the potential of using commercial fishing vessels to bridge the gap in research vessel capacity. The various tasks and required instrumentation are presented and discussed. To illustrate this concept a description of a Norwegian krill fishing vessel now under construction is presented. This type of combined fishing and research vessel could make a large amount of important data available for both management, through CCAMLR, and the broader scientific community and thus improve the basis for resource evaluation and management.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 10/13/19

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Sunday’s sports events:MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLAMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYOFFSHouston 3. NY Yankees 2 — 11 inningsNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PRESEASONBoston 118, Cleveland 72LA Clippers 118, Melbourne 100New Orleans 123, San Antonio 114Philadelphia 126, Orlando 94Chicago 105, Toronto 91Milwaukee 115, Washington 108Minnesota 131, Maccabi 101NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEPittsburgh 7, Winnipeg 2Vegas 5, Los Angeles 2 San Jose 3, Calgary 1NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUECarolina 37, Tampa Bay 26Houston 31, Kansas City 24Seattle 32, Cleveland 28Baltimore 23 Cincinnati 17New Orleans 13 Jacksonville 6Minnesota 38, Philadelphia 20Washington 17, Miami 16San Francisco 20, LA Rams 7Arizona 34, Atlanta 33NY Jets 24, Dallas 22Denver 16, Tennessee 0Pittsburgh 24, LA Chargers 17Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. October 14, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 10/13/19center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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It all adds up

first_imgIndividual cancer-causing mutations have a minute effect on tumor growth, increasing the rate of cell division by just 0.4 percent on average, according to new mathematical modeling by scientists at Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and other institutions.The research, appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reinforces that cancer is the culmination of many accumulated mutations. It also highlights the fundamental heterogeneity and randomness of many cancers, consistent with the observations of epidemiologists and clinicians.“This work suggests that significant tumor growth probably requires the slow and steady accumulation of multiple mutations in a cell over a number of years,” says lead author Ivana Božić, a doctoral student in Harvard’s Department of Mathematics and Program for Evolutionary Dynamics. “It also helps explain why so many cancer-driving mutations are needed to form an advanced malignancy within the lifetime of an individual.”All cells undergo regular division and death, processes that ordinarily balance out each other. In cancer this balance is broken, leading to invasive tumors that crowd out healthy cells and spread.“While emerging data from the sequencing of cancer genomes are illuminating, their reconciliation with epidemiological and clinical observations poses a major challenge,” she says. “Our novel mathematical model begins to address this disconnect.”Božić’s work adds to scientists’ recent efforts to differentiate between “driver” and “passenger” mutations in tumors. Researchers have found that most solid tumors contain 40 to 100 mutations in coding genes, but that on average only 5 to 15 of these actually drive tumor growth. The others are simply along for the ride: associated with driver mutations, but not benefiting the tumor.Tumors begin growing with the first mutation that provides an advantage over other cells, allowing them to grow ever-so-slightly faster than their neighbors. But as these driver mutations slowly accumulate in a given cell, the effect is akin to the accelerating growth of savings through compound interest: Increasingly rapid cell division feeds the ever-faster addition of more driver mutations.Božić’s work hints that the time elapsed between driver mutations in a nascent tumor may be key to ultimate outcomes.“For instance, we find that an individual who goes 20 years without experiencing a second driver mutation in the same cell might never see the tumor grow to more than a few thousandths of a gram,” she says. “But a second driver mutation within five years may develop within 25 years into a tumor weighing hundreds of grams.”These predictions are consistent with clinical observations that it generally takes 30 or more years for human cancers to develop from initiated cells. Božić and colleagues also verified the accuracy of their model by testing against clinical data from two well-studied tumors, glioblastoma multiforme and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.In addition to clarifying the advantage bestowed by each driver mutation, Božić and colleagues provide a formula for estimating the number of these in a given tumor.“Needless to say, figuring out which mutations, and how many mutations, are drivers of cancer is very important in developing effective therapies,” she says. “We hope our work will help drive new lines of research into future treatments.”Božić’s co-authors on the current PNAS paper are Tibor Antal and Martin A. Nowak of Harvard’s Program for Evolutionary Dynamics; Hannah Carter, Dewey Kim, Rachel Karchin, Kenneth W. Kinzler, and Bert Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins University; Hisashi Ohtsuki of the Tokyo Institute of Technology; and Sining Chen of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Their work was sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and J. Epstein.last_img read more

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Dell Technologies Achieves Top Ranking in SQL Server TPC-H Benchmark

first_imgIf you want to find a list of the 20 best electric toothbrushes for 2020, you have plenty of options. But where do you go when you want to see a list of the top 10 data warehouse technologies?—probably not your regular social media channels. For those of you who don’t follow database benchmarking news, it’s the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) that provides the most trusted source of independently audited database performance benchmarks. Two of TPC’s primary activities are creating good benchmarks and creating a process for auditing those benchmarks.Dell Technologies recently achieved the top position on the TPC (tpc.org) leaderboard for the decision support workload benchmark (TPC-H) price/performance results for a 10,000 GB database. This benchmark tests decision support systems that are designed to examine large volumes of data, run highly complex queries, and provide answers to critical business questions. The TPC-H top-ranked system for price/performance was the Dell EMC PowerEdge R940xa server running Microsoft SQL Server 2019 Enterprise Edition with the Windows Server 2019 operating system.1The performance metric reported for TPC-H is the Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric ([email protected]). Most database benchmarks for high-transaction workloads are stated in transactions per second (TPS). The queries-per-hour calculation for the decision support benchmark is the result of the queries being far more complex than most OLTP transactions. The decision support queries include a rich combination of transformation operators and selectivity constraints that generates intense activity on the database server being tested.When it comes to choosing servers that will perform well with many concurrent decision support requests, the configuration is critically important. In our Dell labs, we worked on a configuration that provided a balance between price and performance. The PowerEdge R940xa server used for this benchmark was configured with four Intel Xeon Platinum 8280L processors supplying 112 cores (224 logical cores with Intel Hyper-Threading) plus 6 TB of memory. Storage for the benchmark system was supplied by ten 1.6 TB Mix Use SAS SSDs capable of 12 Gbps plus four 6.4 TB Mixed Use Express Flash NVMe small form factor 2.5-inch drives. The Dell engineers achieved 1,420,550.7 TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour ([email protected],000 GB) with price/performance of $0.67 USD/[email protected],000 GB. The TPC Benchmark H Full Disclosure Report is available on the TPC website.1Benchmarks that rank database systems using real-world workloads typical of decision support environments provide insights to IT professionals by providing a comparison of both price and performance. Perhaps the most important advantage of considering benchmarks when evaluating technology options is the value added by having an independent analysis of test results. The independent analysis means the benchmark results have integrity and show where a system stands compared with other systems. Anyone can then look at the system configuration in the TPC Full Disclosure Report to understand how the system was configured to achieve a top price/performance result. For IT professionals, the report results mean that PowerEdge R940ax servers are among the top price/performance systems for accelerating decision support and similar systems for a 10 TB SQL Server 2019 database.1SQL Server, along with other RDBMS products from leading vendors, is quite efficient at using memory and solid-state-drive technology. More memory and faster disk drives can usually improve database performance for many types of workloads. With its multiple configuration options, the PowerEdge R940xa can accelerate many databases workloads, such as decision support, online transaction processing, data warehouses, and more.More information about this testing is available on the PowerEdge R940xa TPC-H Benchmark Data Sheet. For technical information, see the PowerEdge R940xa rack server page for specifications, customizations, and details. In addition, Dell Technologies offers a portfolio of other rack servers, tower servers, and modular infrastructure that can be configured to accelerate most any business workload.Learn more about Microsoft SQL Server Solutions:We welcome you to join us at Microsoft Ignite this week. Registration for this virtual event is open to all and will be an excellent opportunity to learn how Microsoft and Dell Technologies’ solutions are helping to shape the data landscape. More information can be found on our Ignite Partnership Page.Dell Technologies has a broad portfolio of solutions for Microsoft SQL Server. Our Info Hub for SQL Server solutions is a technical library for researching and learning about these solutions. It includes white papers about SQL Server Big Data Clusters, SQL Server 2019 in containers, and running SQL Server on vSAN Ready Nodes, among many other resources.Are you more interested in an overview of the many solutions for SQL Server? For a business overview of how Dell Technologies and Microsoft can enable your company with modern infrastructure and agile operations, see the Dell Technologies solutions page for Microsoft SQL Server.¹ Based on TPC Benchmark H (TPC-H), Sept 2020, the Dell EMC PowerEdge R940xa server has a TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour metric of 1,420,550 when run against a 10,000GB Microsoft SQL Server 2019 database in a non-clustered environment yielding a TPC-H Price/Performance of $0.67 USD per query-per-hour. Actual results may vary based on operating environment. Full results on tpc.org.last_img read more

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Germany’s Commerzbank to cut 10,000 jobs, slash branches

first_imgFRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Germany’s Commerzbank says a proposed restructuring would mean dropping 10,000 full-time jobs. That amounts to one in every three jobs at the bank in Germany. The bank is cutting costs and moving more business online through use of digital technology. That means it plans to cut its branch network from 790 to 450. The goal is to increase profitability by 2024. The news came in a statement to investors that says the drastic restructuring will be discussed by the board of directors Feb. 3. Commerzbank said the restructuring will mean expenses of 1.8 billion euros, some of which has already been set aside from earnings.last_img read more

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Robert Simpson directs Champlain College’s Criminal Justice program

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Robert V. Simpson, Jr. has been named interim director of the Criminal Justice program at Champlain College.Simpson is a longtime Vermont attorney and state’s attorney, and he’s been a member of the Vermont Attorney General’s staff, as well. Most recently he conducted civil litigation, including fraud cases, for the Vermont Attorney General’s Office. From 2001 to 2006 he served as Chittenden County State’s Attorney, responsible for an office of 26 staff, a caseload that ranged from domestic assault to murder, and cases generated by more than 300 police officers.Simpson has been an adjunct instructor at Champlain College since 1990, teaching criminal procedure, substantive criminal law, administrative law and white-collar crime courses over the years. He’s currently reworking online courses in these areas and will teach on campus and online this fall. In addition, he will serve as an advisor to Criminal Justice students. Champlain’s program provides a solid foundation for careers in law enforcement, corrections or investigation, as well as for further study in the field of law.Simpson is an Army veteran and an alumnus of Vermont Law School and Colgate University. He resides in Burlington.# # #last_img read more

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Trump Tariff Decision Deals a Blow to U.S. Solar

first_imgTrump Tariff Decision Deals a Blow to U.S. Solar FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg News:In the biggest blow he’s dealt to the renewable energy industry yet, President Donald Trump decided on Monday to slap tariffs on imported solar panels.The U.S. will impose duties of as much as 30 percent on solar equipment made abroad, a move that threatens to handicap a $28 billion industry that relies on parts made abroad for 80 percent of its supply. Just the mere threat of tariffs has shaken solar developers in recent months, with some hoarding panels and others stalling projects in anticipation of higher costs. The Solar Energy Industries Association has projected tens of thousands of job losses in a sector that employed 260,000.“Developers may have to walk away from their projects,” Hugh Bromley, a New York-based analyst at Bloomberg New Energy Finance, said in an interview before Trump’s decision. “Some rooftop solar companies may have to pull out” of some states.U.S. panel maker First Solar Inc. jumped 9 percent to $75.20 in after-hours trading in New York. The Tempe, Arizona-based manufacturer stands to gain as costs for competing, foreign panels rise. First Solar didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The Solar Energy Industries Association also didn’t immediately respond.The first 2.5 gigawatts of imported solar cells will be exempt from the tariffs, Trump said in a statement Monday. The president approved four years of tariffs that start at 30 percent in the first year and gradually drop to 15 percent.The duties are lower than the 35 percent rate the U.S. International Trade Commission recommended in October after finding that imported panels were harming American manufacturers. The idea behind the tariffs is to raise the costs of cheap imports, particularly from Asia, and level the playing field for those who manufacture the parts domestically.Trump’s solar decision comes almost nine months after Suniva Inc., a bankrupt U.S. module manufacturer with a Chinese majority owner, sought import duties on solar cells and panels. It asserted that it had suffered “ serious injury” from a flood of cheap panels produced in Asia. A month later, the U.S. unit of German manufacturer SolarWorld AG signed on as a co-petitioner, adding heft to Suniva’s cause.Suniva had sought import duties of 32 cents a watt for solar panels produced outside the U.S. and a floor price of 74 cents a watt.China and neighbors including South Korea may opt to challenge the decision at the World Trade Organization — which has rebuffed prior U.S.-imposed tariffs that appeared before it.Lewis Leibowitz, a Washington-based trade lawyer, expects the matter will wind up with the WTO. “Nothing is very likely to stop the relief in its tracks,” he said before the decision. “It’s going to take a while.”More: President Trump Slaps Tariffs on Solar Panels in Major Blow to Renewable Energylast_img read more

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IPE Views: UN Climate Summit – Political rhetoric versus investor action

first_imgAnd finally, a success because institutional investors the world over were able to lobby governments for change to regulation that will mobilise $1trn a year in low-carbon investment.Nevertheless, the conference was a case of preaching to the choir, with climate evangelists talking with other supporters, and those governments that wish to be seen as environmentally friendly dispatching their prime ministers or presidents to extol the virtue of being the greenest government ever.The 400 companies that have come out in favour of carbon pricing, part of UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon’s Caring for Climate initiative, are more noteworthy. In an ideal world, governments would take bold action and introduce carbon pricing despite business resistance – as markets such as Australia and the European Union have.Emissions trading schemes (ETS) are not the sole solution for tackling growing greenhouse gas emissions, but they do provide an incentive to reduce output, as the levels of carbon produced before and immediately after the abolition of Australia’s ETS proved.It would also offer a financial disincentive to continued investment in high-carbon activities, as Anne-Marie Corboy, chief executive at the AUD28bn (€19bn) HESTA Super, told the conference – a view likely to be shared by Frank Pegan, chief executive of the AUD5.3bn Catholic Super, who said ahead of the event that the abolition of Australia’s ETS was a “backward” policy.Corboy, however, was also realistic during her address. “No single investor can change either system alone, but, by showing leadership and reinforcing others in the system, we can contribute to change and hasten the low-carbon future we all need.”The need for supportive capital was the UN’s motivation behind its 2010 Green Climate Fund. Four years later, the venture has so far only attracted $2.3bn to invest in emerging market climate projects – $1bn committed on Wednesday by France, a further $1bn previously offered by Germany. It shows that, despite government recognition of the risks of climate change, very little concrete action is forthcoming.The hope remains that, spurred by the private sector’s coordinated response, as foundations move to divest fossil fuel, pension investors reduce carbon and companies call for a carbon price, governments will be compelled to agree new, binding carbon-reduction targets at next year’s conference in Paris.At that point, the investor community’s work may pay off, as they remember that these reduction targets can be delivered with the help of investors worldwide, aided by a new regulatory framework boosting low-carbon investment to the targeted $1trn a year. Despite coordinated lobbying from investors and rousing rhetoric from governments, Jonathan Williams wonders whether the UN Climate Summit achieved anythingThe UN Climate Summit in New York – which attracted more than 120 heads of state and government, campaigners including actor Leonardo DiCaprio and Nelson Mandela’s widow Graça Machel – should be viewed as a success and failure in equal measure.A success because, in the run-up to the one-day event, its host city saw more than 300,000 protesters take to the street, demanding action on climate change. While this pales in comparison to the turnout for anti-war protests, it also highlights that climate change is no longer the sole concern of green NGOs.A success because AP4, Sweden’s SEK274bn (€30bn) buffer fund, will lead a pack of institutions in reducing the carbon footprint of $100bn (€78bn) in assets by next December – proving it an eminently sound and practical investment decision.last_img read more

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Irish regulator supports multi-employer DC to drive consolidation

first_imgIreland’s Pensions Authority has signalled it would like to see growth in the number of multi-employer funds as it pursues its “explicit” goal to decrease the number of defined contribution (DC) funds.Pensions regulator Brendan Kennedy said the organisation was seeking to grow its enforcement powers in the area of DC governance but added that it was after “more nuanced” powers to help with its oversight of the market.Kennedy – who, prior to the creation of the Authority, was chief executive of the Pensions Board – told an Irish Association of Pension Funds conference on governance that it was the organisation’s goal to raise the requirements for DC trustees, focusing on the areas of trustee knowledge, commitment and skill.In his bluntest endorsement of consolidation in the DC sector, he also said it was the Authority’s explicit goal to “substantially reduce” the current number of funds. “There are too many schemes to make it possible to achieve the trustee standards we believe are needed,” he told delegates.“The current scheme numbers increase costs and make effective regulatory oversight and dialogue too difficult.“Clearly, this objective means there has to be many fewer single-employer schemes.”Kennedy has previously said the Authority was committed to the “principle” of reducing the number of schemes, and that it would be difficult to justify the continued existence of more than 100 DC funds in a country the size of Ireland.He has previously ruled out the use of a licensing system for DC funds, as it would increase the amount of regulation.The regulator further told delegates that he would seek additional powers to oversee governance of DC funds, although this would take the shape of increased dialogue with trustees.He also said the organisation would want additional, “more nuanced regulatory powers that will underpin a more detailed oversight of DC schemes”.The Authority will also be seeking to increase the standard of defined benefit trusteeship, and Kennedy said it was already in discussion with the Department of Social Protection over amending existing regulation.The proposed changes to DC regulation are under consideration as the Irish government plans the launch of a supplementary pension system.Minister for social protection Joan Burton has previously said the rollout of such a system would be “very gradual”, but pledged that details of the reform would be published next year.last_img read more

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New York Stock Exchange Trading Floor Reopening Today

first_imgThe trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange reopens today, after two months of all-electronic trading because of the coronavirus.The floor will look a lot different than it has, with only a quarter of the usual number of traders allowed to return to work. The few traders on the floor will have to wear masks, follow strict social distancing rules, and avoid using public transportation. They’ll be screened and have their temperatures taken as they enter the building. The most photographed trader o Wall Street, Peter Tuchman tested positive for coronavirus.The New York Stock Exchange trader, who calls himself the “Einstein of Wall Street” on his Instagram page, revealed the diagnosis with the picture of a Corona Extra beer bottle and an emoticon of hands joined together. Stock futures are on the rise because of optimism over the possibility of a coronavirus vaccine. The Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were up over 300 points. There were also positive signs for the Nasdaq and S&P 500. Wall Street was silent on Monday because of Memorial Daylast_img read more

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