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‘Hateful’ woman threatened to call police on 8-year-old for selling water, mom says

first_imgABCNews.com(SAN FRANCISCO) — A San Francisco mom says she was “shocked” when her neighbor threatened to call the police on her 8-year-old daughter for selling bottled water without a permit over the weekend.The story went viral on Saturday after Erin Austin filmed the exchange with her neighbor, later identified as Alison Ettel, because she feared the situation might be racially motivated. Her daughter, Jordan, is biracial and Ettel is white.“Calling the police on any person of color these days is an issue. They come, they shoot first and they ask questions later,” Austin told “Good Morning America.” “Knowing that and knowing everything that’s going on in the media, why would you call the police on a child of color?”The video received thousands of comments and shares on social media, as users accused the woman, dubbed “Permit Patty,” of racism. People were quick to compare the situation to an April incident in Oakland, where a white woman called the police on a black family barbecuing in a park.Jordan, who was selling the water to raise money for a trip to Disneyland, said she “never thought” she would make any of her neighbors upset when she set up her water cooler outside.She said she had only been set up for about 15 minutes when the woman approached her, “saying she was trying to work and we were being too loud.”“I did not want to see the police because I was scared,” Jordan told GMA. “I just went … to my mom, and my mom just dealt with it.”She said the incident changed the way she views her neighbor.“Now I’m starting to think she did it on purpose,” Jordan said, “because I think she doesn’t care about people’s skin colors, because she doesn’t care about people’s lives except for hers.”Ettel, who said she’s been getting death threats since the video was posted, denied accusations of racism.“I have no problem with enterprising young women. I want to support that little girl. It was all the mother and just about being quiet,” Ettel told the Huffington Post on Saturday. “I had been putting up with this for hours, and I just snapped.”She said she only “pretended” to call the police.“I completely regret that I handled that so poorly,” Ettel said. “It was completely stress related, and I should have never confronted her. That was a mistake, a complete mistake.”Austin denied the woman’s claims that she or her daughter were being loud.“I know in her interview she said it was stress related, but that’s not an excuse,” Austin said. “People lose it, but you don’t lose it on children. There’s no excuse for what she did.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Record-breaking arctic blast stretches from Midwest to Northeast to South

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — An arctic blast is taking over a large swath of the country Wednesday, with brutally cold temperatures paralyzing the Midwest, the Northeast and even the deep south.The wind chill plummeted Wednesday morning to a bone-chilling 1 degree in Syracuse, 4 degrees in Boston and 8 degrees in Pittsburgh.Even the South was feeling the arctic blast, with wind chills falling to 17 degrees in Raleigh, 15 degrees in Knoxville and 21 degrees in Atlanta. Temperatures in parts of Louisiana and Mississippi on Wednesday morning were in the 20s and 30s — colder than any temperature recorded all of last winter.More than 300 record cold temperatures were reported in the last two days, including in Chicago, where the high of the day Tuesday was 17 degrees — the coldest high temperature ever recorded this early in the season.New York City and Philadelphia dropped to a frigid 23 degrees Wednesday morning, breaking daily records in both cities.By Wednesday afternoon, it warmed up slightly — to a wind chill of 9 degrees in Chicago, 21 degrees in Boston, 16 degrees in Cleveland and 40 degrees in Atlanta and New Orleans.Thursday will be another cold morning, with wind chills forecast to clock in at 17 degrees in Chicago, 11 degrees in Minneapolis, 20 degrees in Boston and 26 degrees in Atlanta.But the record-breaking deep freeze won’t last long. By Friday, temperatures will rebound to above freezing in Chicago and New York City will thaw to about 50 degrees.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 2/26

first_img Written by Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys Basketball3-A State Semifinals @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Cooper Black amassed 16 points and 4 rebounds as the San Juan Broncos upset No. 1 seed Grantsville 51-49 Friday in the state semifinals at the Sevier Valley Center. The Broncos shot 50 percent (19-38) from the field and made a key defensive stop in the closing seconds to silence the Cowboys. Davin Ekins netted 12 points and  5 rebounds on 6-11 from the field in defeat for Grantsville. San Juan, who is seeking their first state title since 1992, and third in school history, will play for a state title Saturday at 6:45 pm against Juab.RICHFIELD, Utah-Ty Allred netted 21 points, 8 rebounds and 7 assists as the Juab Wasps downed Judge 58-52 to advance to the 3-A state title game Friday during the 3-A state semifinals. Dawson Olsen added 19 points and 5 rebounds for the Wasps, who shot 65 percent (24-37) for the game. Dom Burns led the Bulldogs in defeat with 27 points.3-A State Consolation Bracket @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Moroni Seely Roberts posted 29 points and 12 rebounds on 9-15 from the field as the Grand Red Devils ovepowered Carbon 68-56 Friday in the 3-A consolation bracket at the Sevier Valley Center. Preston Condie had 16 points and 7 rebounds in the loss for the Dinos.RICHFIELD, Utah-Grady Thompson netted 26 points and 13 rebounds as the Manti Templars clobbered Richfield 64-43 in the 3-A consolation bracket at the Sevier Valley Center Friday. Manti shot 56 percent (25-45) for the game in the victory. Max Robinson had 20 points in defeat for the Wildcats. Manti next plays Grand for 5th-6th place Saturday at 11:30 am.Girls Basketball3-A State SemifinalsRICHFIELD, Utah-Elena Birkeland led the way with 14 points and the Morgan Trojans upset No. 4 seed Carbon 59-50 in the 3-A state semifinals Friday at the Sevier Valley Center. Janel Blazzard added 12 points, 7 assists and 6 rebounds in the win for the Trojans, who will play for a state championship Saturday at 4:30 pm against Emery.RICHFIELD, Utah-Baylee Jacobson posted 18 points, 10 rebounds ad 7 assists as the Emery Spartans humbled Grantsville 69-52 at the Sevier Valley Center Friday in the 3-A state semifinals. Maison White amassed 31 points and 15 rebounds in defeat for Grantsville. Grantsville plays Carbon in the 3rd-4th place game Saturday at 1:00 pm3-A State Consolation Bracket @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Rebecca Poulsen posted 18 points on 6-10 from the field and Nicole Willardson added 14 points on 6-10 shooting as the Richfield Wildcats dismantled the South Sevier Rams 45-21 Friday during 3-A state consolation bracket action at the Sevier Valley Center.  Leah Torgerson’s 6 points led the Rams in defeat. Richfield will play for 5th-6th place Saturday at 10:00 am at the Sevier Valley Center against Judge Memorial.RICHFIELD, Utah-Marika Collins posted 14 points and 9 rebounds and the Judge Memorial Bulldogs ended Delta’s season with a 45-37 win over the Rabbits during 3-A state consolation bracket action Friday at the Sevier Valley Center. Jadee Dutson had 14 points and 5 rebounds in the loss for the Rabbits.center_img February 26, 2021 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 2/26last_img read more

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Gov. Holcomb Announces First STEM Team Award Winners

first_imgPictured Left to Right: Ujwala Pamidimukkala, Samantha Fassnacht, Indiana Treasurer Kelly Mitchell, Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb, Miranda Shook, Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. Jennifer McCormick, Truman Bennet.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Math WinnerStudent:  Truman BennetAttends:  Marion High School, Senior High resolution photos of all winners are available upon request. Nominations for the 2018 Governor’s STEM Team will open in the fall. Engineering WinnerStudent:  Miranda ShookAttends:  Greenfield-Central High School, Senior Future Plans:Truman intends to one day obtain a Ph.D. in Mathematics. Accomplishments:Truman has earned a number of awards and achievements in Mathematics throughout his high school career. He earned a perfect score on his AP Calculus AB Exam in 2016, and he was one of only 18 students in the world (approximately 0.006 percent of all applicants) to earn every possible point on the assessment. This distinction was honored by the Indiana legislature and the City of Marion.Additionally, Truman earned first place in both the individual and team categories in the 2016 Huntington University Math Competition, first place in the 2016 Trine University Math Competition, and first place in the 2014 Huntington University Math Competition. Accomplishments:Miranda is ranked ninth in her class and will earn both an Academic and Technical Honors Diplomas when she graduates this month. She was the president of the Women in STEM group at Greenfield-Central and has participated in many engineering activities and competitions. She was the high school’s driver and engineer for the Nasa Rover Challenge, leading her team to a second place victory and fifth place in the high school division. Miranda represented her school and Rover team in a presentation to First Lady Pence. She was a designer for the Vex Robot competition and chosen by her school to represent the Rover and Vex competition programs.  Miranda also presented her paper on possible energy sources on Mars at NASA. Students were nominated for the first Governor’s STEM Team earlier this year, and a panel of STEM professionals, teachers and university representatives evaluated more than 100 applications to select the winners based on academic performance, work in research, leadership, community service and extracurricular involvement. Technology WinnerStudent:  Samantha FassnachtAttends:  Westfield High School, Senior Future Plans:Miranda will be a German ambassador with the Congress Bundesstag Youth Exchange before heading to Valparaiso University to study Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Future Plans:Samantha intends to study computer science at the University of Toronto. In 2016 and 2017, she was selected as the Indiana state winner, and in 2017 she earned a National Honorable Mention award for her involvement and experience in computer science and technology.Samantha is also a National Merit Finalists and a US Presidential Scholars Candidate. INDIANAPOLIS – Governor Eric J. Holcomb, Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. Jennifer McCormick and Treasurer Kelly Mitchell today announced the winners of the 2017 Governor’s STEM Team awards.“These four students have demonstrated excellence in subjects that are fueling the innovation and entrepreneurship to build our economic future,” Gov. Holcomb said. “It’s a pleasure to recognize their hard work on a statewide level and elevate Indiana’s academic superstars. I can’t wait to see where the future takes these bright young Hoosiers.”The awards highlight Indiana’s elite high school students for their work in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Each winner received a $1,000 college scholarship through Indiana’s CollegeChoice 529 Direct Savings Plan, letterman jackets identifying them as members of the Governor’s STEM Team and tickets to Gen Con Indy—the longest-running gaming convention in the world.“Success in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math drives our students and our state forward,” said Dr. Jennifer McCormick, Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction. “I am excited to see the passion for STEM exhibited by Ujwala, Samantha, Miranda and Truman, and I am honored to be a part of the 2017 Governor’s STEM Team award ceremony.”“STEM education is vital to developing Indiana’s workforce, and CollegeChoice 529 is helping young Hoosiers reach educational goals in these critical fields,” said Kelly Mitchell, Indiana Treasurer of State. “As chair of the CollegeChoice Plans, I am delighted to help reward the outstanding students of the Governor’s STEM Team for their achievements and see where their studies take them in the years to come.”Four students—one from each of the four STEM subject areas—were honored in a ceremony today in the Governor’s Office.Science WinnerStudent:  Ujwala PamidimukkalaAttends:  Columbus North High School, SeniorAccomplishments:Ujwala ranked first in her class of 435 students. She has earned a number of awards and achievements throughout high school, including National Merit Finalist, U.S. Presidential Scholars Candidate, and Indiana Academic All-Star Finalist.Ujwala also placed first in the state for both Medical Math and Pharmacy Tech in the 2016 Health Occupations Students of America competition.Future Plans:Ujwala plans to continue to pursue these academic interest in college by majoring in molecular biology.  She aspires to be a cardiovascular surgeon. Accomplishments:Samantha has been recognized several times from the National Center for Women in Information Technology (NCWIT) Aspirations in Computing Award, a national competition that recognizes high school women for their contributions to technological fields.last_img read more

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Goshen Public Library back open three days a week

first_img The Goshen Public Library is reopening three days a week, beginning today.The library will be open every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. for people to use essential services related to unemployment applications, SNAP (Nutritional Assistance Program) and other benefits.During this time, fax, photocopying and scanner stations will be available for emergencies or highly important documents only.To use a computer, you must first contact the library to make an appointment either by phone – (574) 533-9531 – or by using the library’s contact form.The library is also limiting the number of people who can be inside at the same time, and security measures will be enforced.Books and other materials are still not available to look at, or check out.You can read the full statement issued by the library below. Google+ Goshen Public Library back open three days a week Facebook By Brooklyne Beatty – April 28, 2020 0 571 Twitter Pinterest TAGScoronavirusCOVID-19essential servicesGoshen Public LibraryreopenssaturdayThursdayTuesday Facebookcenter_img CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Previous articleGroup to protest conditions at Westville Correctional Facility TuesdayNext articleUPDATE: INDOT cancels Thursday’s virtual career fair Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

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RSU 9 solar project breaks ground next week

first_imgFARMINGTON – The RSU 9 board convened Tuesday night to discuss labor contracts in executive session and to listen to public presentations.The board heard first from Kurt Penney of ReVision Energy who gave an update on the solar array project that RSU 9 signed onto back in 2019. The project has encountered a number of delays, but construction is scheduled to begin next week.‘We are planning to have the shovel in the ground one week from today,” said Penney.The contract for the project was signed at the end of 2019 and though the project hasn’t started yet, the agreed rate of the contract which is based on 2019 numbers will still be in place and will be for the next twenty years.“The deal you signed no longer exists, the development costs have risen,” said Penney.Board member Doug Dunlap would like to see a way for students to be exposed to the project which is based in Livermore Falls. He would like to see opportunities for RSU 9 and Foster Tech students to get involved or interested in solar career paths.“Obviously the world is moving ahead in this direction and I think of our students at Mt. Blue High School and Foster Tech Center and I would welcome some thought given to whether there could be some exposure to careers in solar generated energy,” said Dunlap.Board Member, Jeff Harris voiced some concerns regarding the length of the contract.Penney responded by citing the common practice of this type of contract and the benefits it brings.“Every major corporation from Bath Iron Works to large grocery store chains, to every municipality across the state has signed on these net energy billing credits,” said Penney. “You have locked into a fixed rate for electricity and will enjoy any future delta between your known fixed rate and the future cost of energy.”Penney hopes to see the project completed by the end of 2021.The board also heard from Mt. Blue Athletic Director, Chad Brackett and Mt. Blue Middle School Principal, James Black who proposed starting a Mt. Blue High School Sports Hall of Fame.The Inductees would be selected by a committee consisting of current teachers, the MBHS athletic director, executive board members, and community members/alumni.“The candidates would be athletes, coaches, entire teams of distinction or people who have contributed to Mt. Blue athletics in the past. The selection committee would be eight adults at minimum and one current student athlete” said Brackett.Honors can be awarded posthumously, and may be nominated by, Alumni, community members, the Selection Committee, School faculty and staff.Inductees will be presented with a plaque and will receive a nameplate on the Hall of Fame board located in the MBHS gymnasium.Brackett and Black are hoping to secure funding for this project from local businesses and community members.“With other schools we’ve been part of there’s been a lot of sources of funding from local businesses…Skowhegan has a well established hall of fame and that’ how they work it, with donations from businesses and community members,” said Black.The board voted unanimously to approve the creation of the Hall of Fame and the guidelines presented.The board also voted to unanimously to approve of the new ACAB – Harassment and Sexual Harassment of school Employess policy as well as the ACAB-R – Employee Discrimination/Harassment and Title IX Sexual Harassment Complaint Procedures policy.last_img read more

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Lessons for the next Sandy

first_imgDon’t just replace what was lost. Rebuild better, because another storm is coming.That was the message from panelists at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) on Monday who were discussing the devastation that giant storms can bring to coastal communities like those slammed by Hurricane Sandy earlier this fall.The panelists agreed that the time after a storm, when federal disaster relief dollars flow, presents an opportunity to make changes to accommodate a world gradually being affected by climate change.Coastal communities face a “trifecta” of water woes that need to be considered as they adapt to expected changes: sea level rise, storm surge, and increased precipitation, said Jerold Kayden, Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.Kayden was a panelist on a webcast called “Big Weather and Coastal Cities: Resilience in the Face of Disaster.” The forum, sponsored by the HSPH, was presented in collaboration with the Huffington Post. It was moderated by Post senior writer Tom Zeller Jr. and also featured Richard Serino, deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Authority (FEMA); Paul Biddinger, chief of Massachusetts General Hospital’s Division of Emergency Preparedness; and Daniel Schrag, director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, and professor of engineering and applied sciences.Big Weather and Coastal Cities: Resilience in the Face of Disaster Video of the panel discussion from The Forum at HSPH.The time after a disaster offers an opportunity to make positive changes, panelists agreed. Not only is rebuilding required and federal disaster relief available, but officials have the public’s attention — and approval  — to propose changes in building codes and land use patterns.Even with that receptiveness, the panelists agreed that some changes will always be difficult to get through. Compassion for storm victims, compounded by general respect for private property rights, can short-circuit a more clear-eyed assessment of whether a home should be rebuilt. Political considerations also often trump scientific ones, leading to a continuation of policies that have homes crowding vulnerable coastlines even as a warming climate promises rising seas and stronger storms.“We rebuild, but we don’t necessarily rebuild better,” Schrag said.Drawing on the lesson of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Biddinger said, one New York hospital built 12-foot-high storm walls around basement generators. But they didn’t help when Sandy rolled ashore, because there was a 14-foot storm surge, which flooded the basement and knocked out power.Although computer models provide some guidance as to what may be coming in the future, Schrag cautioned against putting too much stock in them, pointing out that the climate changes that humankind is causing on the Earth haven’t been seen for millions of years.“I promise there will be surprises. There will always be mistakes, always surprises,” Schrag said. “No matter how well we prepare, there will be system failures.”In a storm’s immediate aftermath, a lot of attention focuses on the government, even though FEMA’s job is to play a coordinating role for other responders, Serino said. The most important preparations take place in the weeks and months before a storm, when emergency plans and procedures are drafted and equipment is stockpiled. In New York, for example, officials wisely decided to shut down the subway system before the storm struck, limiting damage and allowing a faster restoration of service.Serino also praised the response of religious groups, whose existing networks often can reach those vulnerable after a disaster faster and more efficiently than government responders can. It’s critical, Serino said, for government to recognize and use existing community networks to get relief to people quickly. The most crucial response of all, though, may be that of individuals, reaching out to each other.“We saw neighbors helping neighbors, saving lives all up and down the coast,” Serino said.Hurricane Sandy has fostered a conversation on climate change and adaptation unlike previous large storms, Schrag said. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg helped with that focus, in part through his endorsement of President Barack Obama for re-election because of Obama’s concern over climate change.Sandy was an atypical storm, Schrag said. It strengthened as it moved north over unusually warm water, and it moved west to make landfall whereas most storms move east, pushed by prevailing winds. Some scientists have hypothesized that the unusual pattern may be related to shrinking Arctic sea ice, Schrag said. If that hypothesis is right, it could mean more storms will be steered to the Northeast, which would be bad news for coastal communities in the region.Although responsiveness to coastal vulnerability has been slow to grow, panelists said that some states and communities are learning the lessons of Katrina and other storms. Serino said that zoning regulations across Florida, for example, have improved because of that state’s frequent hurricanes.For better or for worse, governments and the public probably will have time to build in proper safeguards, Schrag said. Climate change will likely take decades to transform the globe thoroughly.“We’re going to be having this conversation for a very long time,” Schrag said. “We’re going to have to adapt to climate change because it’s going to be with us.” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9aboYBZyic” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/o9aboYBZyic/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Diet may influence risk of aggressive prostate cancer

first_img Read Full Story Dietary patterns that are associated with inflammation and insulimenia — a condition marked by high levels of insulin in the blood — may put men at an increased risk for aggressive forms of prostate cancer, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The study, published Jan. 6 in European Urology, analyzed the dietary patterns of more than 41,000 men over a 28-year period. The findings showed that a hyperinsulinemic dietary pattern was associated with a 7 percent higher risk of advanced prostate cancer and a 9 percent higher risk of fatal prostate cancer. The study also showed that a dietary pattern associated with inflammation was associated with earlier-onset lethal prostate cancer.Benjamin Fu, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Chan School and first author of the study, noted in a Jan. 12 Renal & Urology News article that avoiding dietary patterns with insulinemic or inflammatory potential help prevent prostate cancer, especially among younger men. An insulinemic dietary pattern may include foods such as sugary sweets and fried foods. A dietary pattern associated with inflammation could include processed meats, refined grains, and lower intake of leafy vegetables.Other Harvard Chan School authors of the study included Lorelei Mucci, Ed Giovannucci, Fred Tabung, Claire Pernar, Weike Wang, Amparo Gonzalez-Feliciano, Ilkania Chowdhury-Paulino, and Mingyang Song.last_img read more

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Malloy, Sorin College residents explore dorm’s history

first_imgTom Naatz | The Observer Sorin Hall, left, more commonly known as “Sorin College” after it seceded from the University in 1969, was the first dormitory at Notre Dame. Four University Presidents have lived in the dorm.Prior to 1888, all students lived in residential areas in Main Building. As the University grew and living quarters became crowded, Notre Dame’s founder, Fr. Edward Sorin, decided upon the construction of a separate residence hall, originally intended to be called “Collegiate Hall.” It was only during the laying of the cornerstone on May 27, 1888, that Sorin learned that the hall would be named in his honor. Originally, the entire Notre Dame law school was housed in the first floor of the hall. Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy, former University President and Sorin resident for 38 continuous years, said the law school’s location is what led to the construction of Sorin’s front porch.“The dean of the law school [Colonel William Hoynes] used to go in and out the front door, and one day some students, in an antic, were pouring water on their friends going out, and he got poured on,” Malloy said. “He went to the president, and the president said that we need to build a porch so Colonel Hoynes can get in and out safely.”Since its founding, Sorin has been home to four University Presidents, including Malloy and current University President Fr. John Jenkins. Former Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne and the football players comprising the “Four Horsemen” also lived in the hall.“In some ways, the dorm has changed as the University has changed,” Malloy said. Malloy noted that in addition to multiple renovations and physical changes to Sorin College, the dorm also houses fewer undergraduates than in the past.“When I first moved into Sorin there were 175 students, now we have 147, and that was deliberate to reduce some of the crowding and have more social space,” he said. “In terms of the spirit of the hall and the quality of the students, that’s always been one of the hallmarks of the dorm.”Sorin Hall seceded from the University in 1969. To protest the Vietnam War, the hall residents declared themselves separate from the University, unofficially renaming the hall “Sorin College.”“The seceding was never accepted by the University,” Malloy said. “Nobody did anything. That was the wisdom of [former University President] Fr. Hesburgh — he didn’t respond. He just let it go on. So, it’s still called ‘Sorin College’ by its residents, but the official name is ‘Sorin Hall.’”Hall president, sophomore Steve Provencher, said the dorm community finds its unrecognized secession humorous.“We have a banner that says ‘Sorin Hall: Hall of the Year 1888,’” he said. “And we also have a banner that says ‘1969: College of the Year.’ I don’t think we’ve actually ever won the [Hall of the Year] competition, but we have both those banners which is kind of funny.”However, the dorm’s nominal status as a separate “college” does have an effect on Sorin’s community, Provencher said.“I think we’re definitely kind of independent, and we don’t really care about ‘Rockne’s,’” he said. “We don’t really put a whole lot of effort into them, and we don’t really care about being ‘Hall of the Year.’ … It’s definitely more ‘Sorin loves Sorin.’”The legacy of Sorin College’s secession also lives on in one of the the dorm’s signature events, “Secession Week” — a week in April dedicated to hosting a variety of events for members of the dorm. The week culminates with “Kick-it for Kevin,” a kickball tournament to raise money for cancer research, held in honor of Kevin Healy, a Sorin resident who passed away from cancer in 2009.Sorin’s mascot is the “screaming otter,” which can be recognized on the hall’s crest and interhall sports jerseys, as well as in the residents habit of referring to each other as “brotters,” short for “bro-otters,” Provencher explained. Malloy said that a contest was held to determine the hall’s mascot.“A bunch of guys sat around and they came up with ‘screaming otters,’ and that was about the extent of it,” Malloy said.Malloy said he believes that Sorin enjoys high visibility within the campus community. “We feel we don’t have to explain who we are, people kind of know what Sorin is and who we are,” he said. “I think a second thing is, we’re like Switzerland. When there’s the first snowball fight, where one quad is against another, there’s Sorin just sitting. During first-year orientation time, Sorin doesn’t march around the campus yelling out its name. It never does this. It’s just taken for granted that pretty soon everyone will find out what Sorin is, who Sorin is.”Tags: dorm features, Fr. Monk Malloy, Residence Hall Feature, Sorin College For well over a century, Notre Dame’s first residence hall, Sorin College, has stood on God Quad beside the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. Much has changed since its construction in 1888. For instance, the dorm’s front porch has not always been a part of the building, and Sorin has not always been known as a “college,” Sorin rector Fr. Bob Loughery explained.“That’s what defines us, having that kind of history as a dorm,” Loughery said.last_img read more

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Speaker will assess worldwide progress in reducing poverty & disease at St Mike’s

first_imgSpeaker will assess worldwide progress in reducing poverty & disease UN coordinator of $3.2 billion portfolio to speak at Saint Michael’s on UN Millennium Development Goals Dr. Bisrat Aklilu, executive coordinator of the United Nations Multi-Donor Trust Fund, will speak at Saint Michael’s College on Monday, April 28, at 3:30 p.m. in St. Edmund’s Hall Farrell Room (3rd floor). Dr. Bisrat, an economics professor at Boston University before joining the UN, will speak on the topicThe United Nations and the Millennium Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities.Sponsored by the SMC economics department, the free public lecture marks the occasion of inducting students into the economics honor society Omicron Delta Epsilon. The Millennium Project was commissioned by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2002 to develop a concrete action plan for the world to reverse the grinding poverty, hunger and disease affecting billions of people.At the Millennium Summit in September 2000 the largest gathering of world leaders in history adopted the UN Millennium Declaration, committing their nations to a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty and setting out a series of time-bound targets, with a deadline of 2015, www.unmillenniumproject.org(link is external)Dr. Aklilu administers the UN Trust Fund, which receives development funding from 47 countries and operates in 74 countries with a portfolio of $3.2 billion. An Ethiopian national, Bisrat Aklilu received his Ph.D. from Boston University in 1974 and received an appointment to the BU faculty, where he taught from 1974 to 1979, when he joined the UN as a development economist. Now Executive Director of the Trust Fund, Dr. Aklilu has also served as Acting Director of UN Operations. He was on the board and was chair of the African Sub-Committee of OXFAM America from 1981 to 1989.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 366 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students.In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michaels professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last seven years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2008 U.S. News & World Report rankings.last_img read more

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