Category: tgvuulot

Actress playing murderer in film charged in real life for killing uncle

first_imgSiskiyou Productions(JACKSON CITY, Ore.) — An actress, who plays a murderer in a low-budget horror film, is accused of life intimidating art as she awaits trial for shooting her uncle to death.Asling “Tucker” Moore-Reed was released on bail after she was arrested for shooting her July 2016 manslaughter of Shane Moore in Jackson City, Oregon. Moore-Reed went on to audition for the leading role of “From the Dark” under the pseudonym “Wyn Reed.”Moore-Reed, 30, landed the leading role as Valerie Faust in the “rural murder-thriller” about a tour guide’s last day at work in the isolated mountains where things go wrong. In the film Faust also shoots someone to death.As the movie was filming from April 2018 to July 2018, the investigation into the 63-year-old man’s death continued. Moore-Reed’s defense team handed over her cellphone with a video she recorded of the encounter with Moore in order to provide evidence of self-defense, according to the Washington Post.After the shooting, Moore-Reed hysterically cried “I didn’t mean to shoot him in the chest,” according to the over three-minute video originally posted by The Oregonian.Moore-Reed’s mom, Kelly Moore, is a former California lawyer and also told the Washington Post her daughter acted in self-defense.The Oregon-based production company, Siskiyou Productions, tells ABC News that they found out her real-life murder case on July 23, 2018 — the day after they wrapped on “principal photography.”Because of the lack of the production company’s funds, Moore-Reed was not paid for her participation in the film and they did not conduct any background check on her.The production company said they “believed her story and felt for her deeply” when they heard her self-defense claim. But, once they saw the cellphone footage that caused the charges to get upgraded to murder, the production company’s “perspectives changed.”A trailer for “From The Dark” was released on Oct. 31 after the production company addressed the news about Moore-Reed.“We need to clear the air about some rumors that have been going around,” Siskiyou Production tells ABC News. “Our lead actress is currently facing a legal battle that we were not made aware of until after filming had wrapped. Since then we have been struggling with how to approach this unfortunate situation.”Moore-Reed is currently being held without bail and her trial is set for December. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Pacific Fleet Commander Reaffirms Alliance, Rebalance in ROK

first_img Pacific Fleet Commander Reaffirms Alliance, Rebalance in ROK Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today Pacific Fleet Commander Reaffirms Alliance, Rebalance in ROK Training & Educationcenter_img Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, visited South Korea Nov. 21-22, meeting with senior military and government leaders to reaffirm the U.S. Navy’s commitment to the alliance with the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the ongoing U.S. rebalance to the Pacific.During the two-day visit, Harris met with leaders from both the U.S. and the Republic of Korea, to include The Honorable Sung Kim, U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Korea; Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. Forces Korea; Mr. Kim, Kwan-jin, ROK Minister of Defense; Adm. Choi, Yoon-hee , chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Adm. Hwang, Ki chul, chief of Naval Operations to discuss the strength of the alliance between the U.S. and ROK.“The prosperity enjoyed by South Korea and the United States can be directly attributed to our strong alliance,” Harris said. “Today, this alliance is stronger than ever. My priority is to support our alliance with the right U.S. Navy assets at the right time, to deter aggression, and if required, to fight when called upon.”Harris also emphasized to ROK leaders that strong alliances bring stability to Northeast Asia, which is directly in line with the intent of the U.S. rebalance to the Pacific.“Maintaining stability, peace and prosperity is what the U.S. rebalance to the Pacific is all about,” Harris said. “A key component to that policy is strengthening our regional alliances and partnerships. I am committed to deepening the maritime element of our defense relationships with all of our regional allies and partners.”Harris also thanked the people of the ROK for their support of U.S. Navy forces who are forward-deployed on the Korean peninsula.“Thanks to the wonderful support we get from the people of South Korea, the U.S. Pacific Fleet can remain forward-deployed,” said Harris. “This allows the U.S. Navy to be where it matters, when it matters.”Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea is the regional commander for the U.S. Navy in the Republic of Korea and provides expertise on naval matters to area military commanders, including the Commander for the United Nations Command, the Combined Forces Command, and Commander, U.S. Forces Korea.[mappress]Press Release, November 25, 2013; Image: US Navy November 25, 2013last_img read more

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Secaucus teenager arrested for alleged marijuana possession at high school

first_img× SECAUCUS — An educational school resource officer arrested a 14-year-old at Secaucus High School Dec. 21 for alleged marijuana possession, according to a press release from the town’s police department.The juvenile was charged with possession of marijuana, possession with the intent to distribute on school property, possession with the intent to distribute marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia, the release said. He was processed and released to a parent.last_img

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Ocean City Students Attend Leadership Conference

first_imgNine Ocean City Intermediate School students joined dozens of middle school students from across the state at the 2018-2019 Middle School Leadership Institute conference, “Building Bridges to Success,” held at the Camden County College in Blackwood. The students, under the leadership of guidance counselor Shannon Pruitt and teacher Cholehna Weaver, learned how to effectively address the current challenges they may face in school and in life.The students attended breakout sessions, heard national speakers and sat in on workshops designed to help them develop leadership skills.The program was geared toward empowering the students to make good decisions about their futures. Ocean City Intermediate School students met middle school students from around the state at a leadership workshop. (Photo courtesy JASM Consulting)last_img read more

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Top problem solvers

first_imgThis week at the Harvard Innovation Lab (i-lab) 10 teams of students from across Harvard demonstrated their projects as finalists in the President’s Challenge for social entrepreneurship. The winner and up to three runners-up selected later this month will take shares of the $100,000 purse and continue their residencies at the i-lab.President Drew Faust said that she was struck by the values at the root of the finalist projects. “When we opened the i-lab and launched the President’s Challenge last year, we did so with the hope of attracting individuals with a shared passion for applying knowledge to improve the world,” she said. Faust added that many of the finalist teams connected students from Schools across the University, supporting the theme of “One Harvard.”Patrick Ho, J.D. ’12, co-founder of Vaxess Technologies, which won the inaugural President’s Challenge in 2012, explained how winning the award transformed the Cambridge-based startup company. The most important asset in the face of entrepreneurial uncertainty wasn’t information or stability, but “confidence — overwhelming confidence in the face of the unknown,” he said.“We certainly would not still be here if not for the support provided by President Faust and Harvard University — and given the ambition of your ideas, I can say without exaggeration that it is a benefit not only to the University, but also to the world, that you are now also about to set out on this path thanks to the President’s Challenge,” he said.Finalist teams demonstrated innovative solutions to global problems — some of which have already been set in motion. Nucleik — led by Scott Crouch ’13, Florian Mayr ’13, and Matthew Polega ’13 — created information management software to help law enforcement agencies analyze gang activity. Police in Springfield have been using the tool since last August.Crouch said that the outdated software systems used by police — “like something out of the ’70s and ’80s” — inspired the team to bring law enforcement analysis into the digital age. Nucleik restructures the way data is entered and used, giving officers faster access to complex information and relationships.“The police love it,” Crouch said. “There have been instances when they’ve been able to learn new information about gang members from the analysis, and stop a shooting before it happens. It’s not predictive policing; it’s science.”Crouch said that the support provided to each of the 10 finalist teams, including a $5,000 grant, dedicated space in the i-lab, and guidance from an expert mentor on how to develop the projects, was “phenomenal.”“The workshops and the mentorship have helped us to hone our business model and our approach to entering these cities,” he said. “And the additional funds have allowed us to work with more departments outside Mass. and increase our presence nationally.”Another team, Quantamerix, is inventing a low-cost diagnostic device to test newborn babies for easily treatable diseases. Stephanie Yaung, a Medical School student in the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences Technology program, said that being a finalist in the challenge has broadened the scope of the project immensely.“The workshops we’ve done and the mentors who were assigned to us really helped us to think more deeply about the impact we could make and can make,” she said. “Not just how to implement it, but how to fit into the health care workflow of a country like China, for example, or how to get stakeholders on board — even other applications we hadn’t considered like home monitoring.”Sightline Productions, which merges ethics, theater, genetics, and health, is a collaborative effort that transforms the real-life experience of a patient into a performance project, shedding light on the emotional and mental challenges of a diagnosis and condition.“All of us have to face these questions at some point in our lives,” said Mariel Pettee ’14. “Seeing a performance of how someone has been affected by these problems on an emotional level connects [viewer] to it in a very visceral sort of way. It’s not a historical, stodgy thing — it’s accessible, and modern, and relevant.”Pettee said that with help from the President’s Challenge seed money, the team has been in contact with Columbia Medical School, which has programming in narrative medicine — a field that helps doctors to interact and connect with patients on a personal level.“The President’s Challenge really helped us with scope,” Pettee said. “Hopefully we’ll be able to bring this production to Columbia, and get scientists and artists together to have these conversations, create more of these professional pieces for the public, and develop socially relevant work.”Gordon Jones, managing director of the i-lab, said: “We’re thrilled to host this challenge again. This year, we’ve introduced workshops and activities for all entrants to the challenge, not just the 10 finalist teams, to enable everyone to develop and get an idea of how to progress their ideas.“The idea behind One Harvard, Jones said, is to create “a place where Schools pursue their excellence by coming together across disciplines, in collaboration and support of students and faculty — we’re proud to be part of that. The i-lab and the President’s Challenge, which we celebrate here today, are just two examples of One Harvard at work.”Graduate School of Arts and Science student George Xu demonstrates his team’s project, Quantamerix, for President Faust.last_img read more

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Will young voters decide the election?

first_img Young voters found more pragmatic than progressive In addition to registering young people to vote, such groups provide access to information about policies and candidates, as well as “the mechanics of actually voting,” said Dawn Boudwin, deputy executive director of network strategy for the Alliance for Youth Action. “We have crews on the ground: calling folks, texting folk, doing relational organizing.”Such outreach matters, she says, “because what we hear is ‘Young people don’t turn out,’ and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.” Some of this originates in the campaigns, she said. “We don’t invest in turning them out like we do with the Boomers.”The problem may be more fundamental, said Dakota Hall, executive director of LIT. Young people “are not being taught they need to be civically engaged in schools,” he said. His group is attempting to counter this with a high school program that “builds activists and lifetime voters.”“Young people are registering in high numbers. They’re turning out for events in high numbers,” said Hall, pointing to protests and successes with regional actions such as removing police officers from schools. “This is the moment that will determine their lives, especially young people of color.“It’s game time,” he added, looking ahead not only to Nov. 3 but to an energized young electorate that will keep pushing for its issues. “Folks are feeling anxious but also excited to do some amazing work.” Related Getting out the vote Fall poll finds them divided on the scope and style of change needed for the nation American voters don’t hate ambitious women, after all Tova Wang on how young people can affect democracy, in advance of National Voter Registration Day center_img Pulled to the polls Study finds some differences in attitude, though, depending on party All indications are that young voters, those 18 to 29, will line up for next month’s presidential election in record numbers, further advancing the generational shift of political power taking place in America.An online seminar Tuesday hosted by the Institute of Politics and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation handicapped what the balloting may tell us about the future of elections and public policy priorities. At “Young Voters Could Decide the Election: Will They?,” pollsters, academics, and on-the-ground organizers shared the signs of a potential youth wave while also discussing the issues that engage young voters and the obstacles in their way.The growth in youth turnout isn’t news. Opening the Zoom panel, moderator Abby Kiesa, director of impact at the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University, discussed the “massive turnout” in 2018, which saw double-digit increases in voters aged 19‒29 in 31 states. But despite rises in participation and voter registration, she said, the complications of COVID-19 put the growing youth influence at risk.Young voters are certainly eager to be involved, said Justin Tseng ’22, co-chair of the Harvard Public Opinion Project. According to the project’s September polling, “This is going to be a youth-driven election,” he said. Indeed, the findings of the national poll of 18- to 29-year-olds point to three conclusions. “Enthusiasm is way up,” said Tseng, noting that 63 percent of respondents said they’d definitely be voting, compared with 47 percent four years ago. Intriguingly, his group also found that the issues that engage young voters have shifted. Although health care, education, and mental health remain concerns, the economy has moved to the forefront, as has the pandemic. In terms of jobs and unemployment, he noted, “Young people are bearing the brunt of COVID-19.” “This is the moment that will determine their lives, especially young people of color. It’s game time.” — Dakota Hall, executive director of Leaders Igniting Transformation Harvard students, staff step up to work elections Finally, said Tseng, young voters are leaning toward Biden by an even larger margin than they supported Obama in 2008, which saw the highest youth turnout sine 1984 (the earliest election for which the project has numbers). While enthusiasm for the Democratic candidate lags behind what it was for Obama, he reported, Biden leads by 33 percent among respondents, while Obama only had a 29 percent lead. (For more findings and results from October polling as it becomes available, see https://iop.harvard.edu/youth-poll.)These numbers are only predictions, of course, and Tseng acknowledged that self-reported “likely” voters don’t always make it to the polls. However, he noted, the gap between likely and actual voters tends to remain constant. “When we see the number of respondents saying that they’re likely voters increase, the number of voters goes up as well,” he said.Michael Hanmer, a professor in the department of government and politics at the University of Maryland, agreed. “Youth turnout is going to be through the roof,” he said. Still, Hanmer, whose studies focus on elections, public opinion, voting behavior, and political methodology, foresees potential problems. “My biggest concern is that with anything that’s relatively new, there’s the potential for mistakes,” he said. “With so many people voting for the first time or voting by mail for the first time, we have to be careful.”The work of helping young voters navigate the system is increasingly falling to advocacy groups like Wisconsin’s Leaders Igniting Transformation (LIT), a nonprofit group aimed at increasing Black and brown youth involvement, and the Alliance for Youth Action, a nationwide network of progressive youth advocacy groups.last_img read more

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Famed author criticizes systematic mass incarceration

first_imgBestselling author Michelle Alexander discussed racial injustice and mass incarceration in the American justice system during a lecture at Saint Mary’s in O’Laughlin Auditorium on Tuesday.Alexander said the criminal justice system has created a new form of the former Jim Crow laws, exemplified in practices like discrimination against felons.“In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race explicitly as a justification for discrimination, exclusion and social contempt, so we don’t,” Alexander said. “Rather than rely on race, we use our criminal justice system to label people of color criminals and then engage in all the practices we supposedly left behind.“Today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against criminals in nearly all the ways it was once legal to discriminate against African-Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination, employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, exclusion from jury service are suddenly legal.“As a criminal, you have scarcely more rights and arguably less respect than a black man living in Alabama at the height of Jim Crow. We have not ended castes in America; we have merely redesigned it.”Alexander said the war on drugs and the get-tough-on-crime movement contributed to the problems of mass incarceration.“Since the drug war began in the 1980s, more than 40 million people have been arrested, primarily for non-violent drug-related offenses,” Alexander said. “There are more people in prisons and jails today just for drug offenses than were incarcerated for all reasons in 1980.“Most Americans violate drug laws in their lifetime. But this war has been waged exclusively in poor communities of color despite the fact that studies consistently show now that for decades, contrary popular belief, colored people are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites.”Alexander said blindness inhibits progress against the oppressiveness of mass incarceration.“If you are not personally affected by this new system, if you yourself have not done time and are labeled a felon and are forced to check off that box on housing applications, employment applications, if you don’t have a brother, sister, nephew, mother, father behind bars, if you yourself have not been made to lie spread eagle on the pavement with a gun at your head, if you yourself have not been touched, it is easy to go around and have no idea what is going on,” Alexander said. “If we are going to build a movement to end this system, we first have to make visible what is in plain sight.”Alexander said more African-American adults are under correctional control today, in prison or jail, on probation or parole than were enslaved in 1850.“What makes neighborhoods safe is not the number of guns but the number of good schools, good jobs, good opportunities for people, opportunities to improve one’s life,” she said. “In so many towns and communities across America, a choice has been made, and it is a deliberate choice, a choice that has been made over and over again.“Rather than good schools, we have built hi-tech prisons. Rather than create jobs, we have embarked on an unprecedented race to incarcerate that has left millions of Americans permanently locked up and locked out.”Alexander said images of racial progress create misconceptions on why prisoners cannot improve their own prospects.“Over the years I’ve given a lot of thought to how we’ve been lulled to sleep, become so indifferent to the suffering and exclusion of those we think of as criminals,” she said. “The reasons are numerous, of course, but among the most important, I think, are the images of great racial progress — images that reinforce that those who are left behind, those who have been stuck at the bottom, those who are cycling in and out of prison find themselves there for reasons that can be barely described as ‘their own fault.’”Alexander said unintentional biases and stereotypes contribute to the reasons police stop African-Americans more than whites.“Most police officers, like the rest of us, know better than to state racial biases, but more importantly, so many of the biases that drive law enforcement decision-making operate on an unconscious level that many well-meaning, well-intentioned officers cannot admit to themselves their own biases,” Alexander said. “A police officer driving down the street seeing a group of young black kids walking with their pants sagging a little bit — the officer says, ‘Oh you know what, I’m going to jump out, check them out, frisk them, see if they got anything on them. I’m doing my job, keeping the streets safe.’“He may not mean those young men any harm. He’s just trying to engage in some good aggressive policing. But that same officer seeing a group of young white kids walking down the street, even with their pants sagging. The officer is not likely to jump out and have them spread eagle on the sidewalk.”Alexander said despite all the problems, there is hope and good news after the events in Ferguson, Missouri, and Staten Island, New York, in recent months and the decrease in incarceration rates.“In honor of all those who risked their lives to end earlier forms of racial and social control, I hope we will commit ourselves to building a truly revolutionary human rights movement for justice,” she said. “A movement for education, not incarceration, for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all legal forms of discrimination against people released from prison — discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. … A movement that challenges all of us to respond for greater care and compassion and concern to those we view as the others.”Tags: mass incarceration, michelle alexander, Racism, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

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Susannah Gill sets new women’s world record for 7 marathons in 7 continents in 7 days

first_imgSusannah Gill, 34, of London has smashed the women’s world record in the World Marathon Challenge, which consists of running seven marathons on seven continents in seven days. Gill in Antartica: Photo Courtesy of Susannah Gill Gill completed the challenge in 24 hours, 19 minutes and nine seconds, beating the previous record by more than three hours. The runner averaged three hours and 28 minutes for each marathon. Mike Wardian of Arlington, VA won the men’s race and holds the world record from 2017 with a time of 2:45. To compete in the World Marathon Challenge, competitors pay an entry fee of 37,500 euros (approximately $42,508) and are flown around the world on chartered planes to complete each marathon. Marathons were run in Cape Town, Perth, Dubai, Madrid, Santiago and Miami over six days.center_img Gill in Miami: Photo Courtesy of Susannah Gill Gill in Cape Town: Photo Courtesy of Susannah Gilllast_img read more

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What is simplicity worth?

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Chuck Sutton Chuck Sutton is director, product management, Life & Annuity Solutions, for CUNA Mutual Group, the leading provider of insurance and financial services to credit unions and their members. In this … Web: www.cunamutual.com Details Remember the rise of meal-kit delivery services? Many thought the craze would keep growing, but by the end of 2018, consumers had already begun to lose interest. One reason is many find the seemingly easy solution to dinnertime is too much work. The next wave of food delivery services that’s poised to take off is ready-to-eat meals.1 These arrive on demand, with preparation requiring only heating and serving. Dinnertime solved. Meal kits may have little to do with credit unions, but the trend illustrates something consumers are demonstrating in every aspect of their lives: Simplicity is key. Simplicity PaysToday’s consumers don’t just demand speed, convenience and simplicity – they expect to pay for it, and they’re unsatisfied when they don’t receive it. One 2018 study found that 55% of consumers surveyed were willing to pay more for simpler experiences2. And, 64% said they’re more likely to recommend a brand because it provides simpler experiences and communications2.A more recent study (March 2019) found a gap between what consumers want and what companies deliver. “Brands are under-delivering on simplicity, with about half of consumers saying brands are not meeting their needs.” Additionally, when asked to rank their needs in order of importance, these consumers ranked simplicity among the most important.3Think about this data in terms of your members. Are you delivering the kind of simplified products and services  that drive long-term member satisfaction and loyalty? Simplified Life InsuranceWhen this year’s Insurance Barometer was released by LIMRA in April, one of its top findings confirmed this trend extends to the insurance industry as well. Almost half of Americans, or 47%, said they’re more likely to buy life insurance using simplified underwriting.4 It makes sense that so many insurance companies are moving away from paper applications and toward end-to-end online experiences. And that medical exams and insurance agents are fading into background. Faster and simpler policies, even if they’re more expensive, are taking the industry by storm.5Opportunity at the Intersection of Simplicity and PriceIf you’re still unsure whether your members will really pay more for simplified issue life insurance, consider this: Life insurance costs less than people think.This wild notion is backed up by data, time and time again. And while past studies may have demonstrated that one demographic or another was less-informed about the true cost of life insurance, LIMRA’s 2019 study didn’t limit its survey question to a single age group:“When asked how much a $250,000 20-year level term life insurance policy would be for a healthy 30-year-old, the median estimate was $500 – more than three times the actual cost.”4Life Insurance Awareness Month is a great time to remind your members:That life insurance is valuable and necessaryThat getting life insurance can be faster and easier than they thinkThat simplified life insurance probably costs less than they thinkAnd, it’s a great time to decide to offer your members what they really want, need and are willing to pay for: simplified issue life insurance. last_img read more

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Boeing scores deals to deliver more than 1,000 missiles to Saudi

first_imgBoeing has been awarded two contracts worth more than US$2 billion for the delivery of more than 1,000 air-to-surface and anti-ship missiles to Saudi Arabia, the Pentagon said Wednesday.A first contract, worth $1.97 billion, is for the modernization of SLAM ER cruise missiles as well as delivery of 650 new missiles “in support of the government of Saudi Arabia,” it said.The contract is to be completed by December 2028 for the SLAM ERs, a GPS-guided air-to-surface missile with a range of up to 155 nautical miles (approximately 180 miles, 290 kilometers). The Pentagon also announced a more than $650 million contract for delivery of 467 new Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles, including more than 400 to Saudi Arabia.The others will be delivered to Brazil, Qatar and Thailand. Support equipment will be supplied to India, Japan, the Netherlands and South Korea, the statement said.In a separate statement, Boeing said the new contracts would ensure the continuation of the Harpoon program through 2026 and restart the SLAM ER production line.Boeing, which said it delivered its last SLAM ER weapon system in 2008, put the total of the contracts at $3.1 billion. A spokeswoman said that included a previously announced order.Topics :last_img read more

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