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Arkansas continues phased reopening as coronavirus cases increase

first_imgKameleon007/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(LITTLE ROCK, Ark.) — Arkansas continued its phased reopening Tuesday, as the number of new COVID-19 cases in the state continued to rise.On Tuesday, the state allowed bars within restaurants to reopen with reduced capacity and mask requirements.The same day, the state reported 4,923 confirmed cases, up 110 from the day before. All but four of those new cases were through community transmission, with the rest occurring in correctional facilities, which have experienced outbreaks throughout the pandemic. Those 106 cases marked the fourth straight day Arkansas’ number of community cases had increased, and were the state’s second-highest daily tally of community transmission since the outbreak began.At his daily coronavirus briefing on Tuesday, Gov. Asa Hutchinson attributed the recent rise in community spread to increased testing, but added that “we still have work to do in Arkansas.” The state’s seven-day rolling average of new COVID-19 cases has also largely trended upward since May 9. “We’d like to see that go down more,” Hutchinson said Tuesday.More than 93,700 tests have been performed in Arkansas, with 39,700 done so far this month alone. The state ultimately aims to test 60,000 residents each month. On Monday, it had a daily testing high of 3,014, according to Dr. Nate Smith, the secretary of the state’s health department.The number of new COVID-19 cases in Arkansas has largely ping-ponged throughout the month, which Smith also attributed to the increased testing. In the last week, the number of new patients hospitalized rose from 60 to 78.“Since we’ve pretty much tripled our testing rate, we are identifying a lot of cases, especially asymptomatic cases that we weren’t picking up before this,” Smith said at Tuesday’s briefing. “Hopefully as we continue to increase our testing, identify more of these new cases, interrupt the spread of COVID-19, we’ll see those numbers stabilize and also go down.”State officials say they’re focusing testing efforts on vulnerable areas such as nursing homes. On Tuesday, Hutchinson announced that the state plans to test every nursing home resident and staffer in June, for upwards of 50,000 new tests, to help limit the spread of the virus.The state is also targeting communities with upticks in cases, such as Forrest City, where a federal corrections facility has seen an outbreak. On Saturday, the state performed 550 tests in the city, “the most extensive testing we’ve done in any community since we started,” Hutchinson said.Arkansas has been loosening restrictions on closed businesses for the past two weeks, starting with gyms, large outdoor venues and places of worship on May 4. On May 11, restaurants could resume dine-in service, and this week sees a slew of more reopenings. On Monday, retailers, casinos and indoor venues were able to resume business, and that day the concert venue TempleLive held its first socially-distanced concert, complete with temperature checks and a majority of seats roped off.Beaches and pools are also on tap to reopen on Friday, ahead of Memorial Day, and standalone bars are scheduled to reopen on May 26. Reopened businesses must follow strict capacity and social distancing guidelines, and everyone is advised to wear face masks in public.The community spread does not appear to be driven by the recent reopenings, Smith said Tuesday.Of the state’s 1,082 active cases, three people reported going to a restaurant within the incubation period, 10 had reported going to a church, six to a barber shop, four to a gym and three to a daycare, Smith reported. “These activities don’t appear to be driving our community cases,” he said.Of those active cases, 630 are in the community, 369 are in correctional facilities and 83 are in nursing homes, Smith said.Arkansas is one of the few states not to have issued a shelter-in-place order during the pandemic, which Hutchinson has argued has been to protect the state’s economy.“We took a serious hit, but not as bad as we would have been if we had laid off another 100,000 or so, had we done that shelter-in-place early on,” Hutchinson said on C-Span last week. “I think we managed it carefully with a targeted response to the COVID-19 virus.”On Tuesday night, a new CDC study underscoring the risks of states reopening traced a cluster of infections in Arkansas to a church in early March before the first case was even discovered there. More than one third of the 92 people who attended the church got sick, three died. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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On the accuracy of glacier outlines derived from remote-sensing data

first_imgDeriving glacier outlines from satellite data has become increasingly popular in the pastdecade. In particular when glacier outlines are used as a base for change assessment, it is important toknow how accurate they are. Calculating the accuracy correctly is challenging, as appropriate referencedata (e.g. from higher-resolution sensors) are seldom available. Moreover, after the required manualcorrection of the raw outlines (e.g. for debris cover), such a comparison would only reveal the accuracyof the analyst rather than of the algorithm applied. Here we compare outlines for clean and debriscoveredglaciers, as derived from single and multiple digitizing by different or the same analysts on veryhigh- (1 m) and medium-resolution (30 m) remote-sensing data, against each other and to glacieroutlines derived from automated classification of Landsat Thematic Mapper data. Results show a highvariability in the interpretation of debris-covered glacier parts, largely independent of the spatialresolution (area differences were up to 30%), and an overall good agreement for clean ice withsufficient contrast to the surrounding terrain (differences �5%). The differences of the automaticallyderived outlines from a reference value are as small as the standard deviation of the manual digitizationsfrom several analysts. Based on these results, we conclude that automated mapping of clean ice ispreferable to manual digitization and recommend using the latter method only for required correctionsof incorrectly mapped glacier parts (e.g. debris cover, shadow).last_img read more

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US soccer star Carli Lloyd kicks 55-yard field goal at Eagles training camp

first_imgWhat did you expect? She’s a World [email protected] | #FlyEaglesFly pic.twitter.com/kIwHOABMKa— Philadelphia Eagles (@Eagles) August 20, 2019Lloyd, who has competed in four World Cups and three Olympics with the U.S. Women’s National Team, recently told GMA after their 2019 win that she’s taking time to “unwind” before making any decisions about her future.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. August 21, 2019 /Sports News – National US soccer star Carli Lloyd kicks 55-yard field goal at Eagles training camp FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailScott Clarke / ESPN Images(PHILADELPHIA) — Two-time FIFA Women’s World Cup champion Carli Lloyd showed off her killer kicking skills at practice with the reigning Super Bowl champs. Written bycenter_img Thank you to the @Eagles for having me out! Thanks to @JustinTuck @jake_elliott22 @MayorRandyBrown for the good time and tips! #55yd pic.twitter.com/owZ16f46Th— Carli Lloyd (@CarliLloyd) August 20, 2019Lloyd showed up to the Philadelphia Eagles training camp on Tuesday and crushed a 55-yard field goal on their own turf.The New Jersey native is a big fan of the birds and shared the cross-sport practice with defensive end Justin Tuck and kicker Jake Elliott.The team gave her a shout-out on Twitter with an alternate look at her high flying kick. Beau Lundlast_img read more

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NFL players team up to promote ocean conservation

first_img Beau Lund Written by December 8, 2019 /Sports News – National NFL players team up to promote ocean conservationcenter_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOcean Conservacy(NEW YORK) — Several NFL players capitalizing on their stardom to raise awareness of ocean conservation are set to unveil customized ocean-themed cleats, beginning on Sunday.Six players have teamed up with Ocean Conservancy, a nonprofit environmental advocacy group, for the fourth annual My Cause My Cleats initiative, which allows players in the NFL to showcase causes that are important to them.Each participant in this year’s initiative has his own special reasons for wanting to promote healthy oceans, which are conveyed in their cleats designs.Jacksonville Jaguar wide receiver Chris Conley told ABC News his love for surfing, a hobby he picked up regularly earlier this year after an initial foray during a vacation in Hawaii, played a role in wanting to be apart of Ocean Conservancy’s cause. A trip in June to St. Barth’s, where he went scuba diving and interacted with other divers, caused him to take “an inventory” of his life and how his daily habits were contributing to the problems inundating the oceans.“The more you learn, the more you see the effects we have on [the ocean], negatively and positively,” Conley said. “If I can see an opportunity where I can help a little bit, then I’ll do it.”Although Conley mostly surfs in Jacksonville’s Neptune Beach, which tends to be on the cleaner side due to the conscientiousness of the residents, he’s seen trash on overseas beaches, such as in the Dominican Republic, he said. He hopes by wearing the cleats, which feature ocean waves and a humpback whale, during Sunday’s game against the San Diego Chargers, he’ll be able to “help educate some people about the effects we can have.”Conley also does his part by picking up errant debris he sees lying on the beach or even on the side of the road, encouraging others to do the same because they’re “eventually going to get washed down to the rivers and into the [ocean] water,” he said.Other players taking part in “My Cause My Cleats” on Sunday include San Francisco 49ers running back Raheem Mostert, whose cleats are decorated with sharks to pay homage to his hometown in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, known as the “Shark Bite Capital of the World,” as well as waves to represent his passion for surfing. Detroit Lions linebacker Jahlani Tavai will wear cleats adorned with the eight main islands in Hawaii, which pay homage to his time at the University of Hawaii. The pod of Killer whales on Atlanta Falcons offensive tackle Kaleb McGary’s cleats highlight the marine life near Puget Sound, where he grew up, and Geremy Davis’ cleats feature sea turtles, his favorite marine species.Miami Dolphin Jonathan Jenkins will be wearing his cleats, which feature a variety of iconic Florida wildlife as well as scenery from the Gulf of Mexico, during the Dec. 22 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, his team’s next home game. Most of the players collaborated with designers to for the final rendition of their cleats, but Mostert designed his entirely on his own.Working with the NFL allows the Ocean Conservancy to “broaden the message,” given the scale and scope of what’s happening in the world’s oceans, George Leonard, the organization’s chief scientist, told ABC News. The decline of ocean health is the product of “putting too much in and taking too much out,” Leonard said. Globally, the oceans are being harmed by overfishing as well as by too much carbon dioxide entering the ocean, which is linked to climate change.To mitigate pollution, Ocean Conservancy has set a goal to remove and divert 54 tons of plastic and other waste from Florida’s coasts and waterways s part of the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee’s Ocean to Everglades environmental initiative.The organization is using the platform for the “biggest sporting event on the planet” to highlight the importance of a healthy ocean, which generates half of the earth’s oxygen and about 30% of the “primary protein” to 3 billion people, Leonard said.“We think this is something that all of us can be concerned about,” he added.Conley reminds people all over the country that there are several ways that they can help conserve the ocean, including participating in something as simple as a beach cleanup or by limiting their use of single-use plastics, such as replacing plastic straws, which can’t be recycled, with metal ones. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Jazz take 2-1 lead into game 4 against the Nuggets

first_img Associated Press August 22, 2020 /Sports News – Local Jazz take 2-1 lead into game 4 against the Nuggets Tags: Denver Nuggets/NBA/NBA Playoffs/Utah Jazz Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailDenver Nuggets (46-27, third in the Western Conference during the regular season) vs. Utah Jazz (44-28, sixth in the Western Conference during the regular season)Lake Buena Vista, Florida; Sunday, 9 p.m. EDTLINE: Jazz -3.5; over/under is 215WESTERN CONFERENCE FIRST ROUND: Utah leads series 2-1BOTTOM LINE: The Utah Jazz face the Denver Nuggets in the Western Conference first round with a 2-1 lead in the series. The Jazz won the last matchup 124-87. Mike Conley scored 27 points to help lead Utah to the victory and Nikola Jokic scored 15 points in defeat for Denver.The Jazz are 5-7 against the rest of their division. Utah ranks eighth in the NBA with 35.8 defensive rebounds per game led by Rudy Gobert averaging 10.1.The Nuggets are 29-16 in Western Conference play. Denver averages 111.3 points and has outscored opponents by 2.1 points per game.TOP PERFORMERS: Donovan Mitchell is averaging 24 points and 4.3 assists for the Jazz. Jordan Clarkson is averaging 15.8 points and 2.6 rebounds while shooting 40.0% over the last 10 games for Utah.Jokic is averaging 19.9 points and 9.7 rebounds for the Nuggets. Michael Porter Jr. is averaging 19.1 points and 7.8 rebounds while shooting 51.5% over the last 10 games for Denver.LAST 10 GAMES: Jazz: 4-6, averaging 117.4 points, 44.2 rebounds, 25.6 assists, seven steals and 4.3 blocks per game while shooting 46.0% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 115.5 points on 48.9% shooting.Nuggets: 4-6, averaging 117 points, 43.3 rebounds, 26.5 assists, 6.3 steals and 4.8 blocks per game while shooting 48.7% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 123.4 points on 49.2% shooting.INJURIES: Jazz: Justin Wright-Foreman: out (not with team), Mike Conley: day to day (self isolating), Ed Davis: out (knee).Nuggets: Vlatko Cancar: out (foot), Will Barton: out (knee), Gary Harris: out (hip).last_img read more

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Union Chief of Staff resigns in protest

first_img“I had previously believed [sic] that the best way to bring about change was from the outside, but under your Presidency, I thought things would be different. “Given the circumstances, I cannot in good conscience continue to serve as Chief of Staff. Therefore, please accept my letter of resignation, effective immediately. His resignation came at the end of his speech in the debate on whether “This House believes Thatcher was a working class hero“, and was followed by Williams’ exit from the Union. “Last Trinity, I was incredibly proud to serve as a Member of Standing Committee – elected on a manifesto pledging to push for the abolition of slates. After months of effort, we passed a trial ban last term – yet the actions of the Librarian have robbed the Membership of the promised Referendum that was due to occur. The Union’s Chief of Staff, Ray Williams, has resigned in protest at the recent decision by the Oxford Union to overturn the trial ban on slates. In Williams’ resignation letter, seen exclusively by Cherwell, he said “When you offered me this position, I was honoured to accept, [sic] believing you to be, as I am, firmly committed to reform and progress in the Union. “I am confident that despite my departure the Standing Committee and Senior Appointed Officials will be more than capable with ensuring the smooth running of this term’s events, which the Membership deserve more than anything.” “I have always been a believer that slates, although not wrong in principle, in recent times at the Union have degenerated by ambition and betrayal, and have toxified our elections. Williams, who was the initial proposer of the trial ban, earlier issued an objection to the Returning Officer’s ruling invalidating the ban, but this was rejected. “However, the recent action of the Librarian, as reported to the press, does not only fly in the face of the democratic principles upon which the Oxford Union was founded, but also risk doing enormous damage to the Union as an institution; the relationship between its Committee and Membership; and its enduring reputation. The Oxford Union and Ray Williams were contacted for comment.last_img read more

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News story: Historic Royal Palaces reappointments

first_imgJane Kennedy is an architect with 35 years’ experience in the care and development of historic buildings and has played a key role in securing the future of some of the finest historic buildings in the country.Professor Sir David Cannadine is a distinguished academic with an international reputation, having written pioneering and influential works of history on many subjects, including on the British monarchy.The roles are not remunerated. These reappointments have been made in accordance with the Cabinet Office’s Governance Code on Public Appointments. The appointments process is regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments. Under the Code, any significant political activity undertaken by an appointee in the last five years must be declared. This is defined as including holding office, public speaking, making a recordable donation, or candidature for election. Both Jane and Sir David have declared no such political activity.last_img read more

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Dr. John Closes Jam Cruise 14 Set With Energizing Performance Of ‘Iko Iko’ [Watch]

first_imgThe pro-shot videos keep coming from the masters at Jam Cruise. This week, we’ve been blessed with incredible footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing the New Orleans standard, “Iko Iko”.Dr. John and his tight band put on an incredible show for the Pool Deck crowd, running through some of his biggest hits and most favorite live covers. The show marked a true highlight for this year’s Jam Cruise, and we are so happy they decided to release this video for the rest of the world to experience.Check out this pro-shot footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing “Iko Iko” on below.Dr. John & The Nite Trippers – “Iko Iko” – Jam Cruise 14[Video: Jam Cruise]last_img read more

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How the mom-and-pop can compete in a changed marketplace

first_imgWith the companies such as Amazon, Airbnb, and Uber transforming the economic landscape, businesses, especially small neighborhood businesses, are having to rethink the traditional model. Balancing goods, services, and profit is becoming increasingly difficult.What does that mean for our communities, customer service, and even jobs?Harvard Business School’s (HBS) Baker Foundation Professor Leonard Schlesinger and senior lecturer of business administration Kristin Williams Mugford are trying to answer those questions, utilizing 30 years of industry data to help keep local businesses in the neighborhood.“The citizen question is, what do we want our neighborhood to be like and feel like?” Schlesinger said. “There are benefits to large-scale companies because they can use technology to manage customer relationships that small businesses struggle [to do]. But there are bigger, broader public policy questions. Small businesses are the engines of growth for job creation and they’re at the very root of what makes our communities different and unique.”These critical issues were discussed during the Faculty Speaker Series lecture “What Great Service Leaders Know and Do” at the Harvard Ed Portal in Allston on Oct. 18. Nearly 40 small business owners, students, and members of the Allston-Brighton community came to learn what customer service means today.Schlesinger opened the discussion by laying out three decades of research on service and service firms, and the approach he said amounts to “common sense”: delivering a high-quality and memorable customer experience, as well as value, whether the business is a car dealership, department store, or pizza-delivery service.“We have encounters we call moments of truth, we understand the underlying psychology of those interactions, and our job as service leaders is to manufacture sets of interactions that are ideally memorable in a positive way,” he said.Positive interaction traditionally has been related to employee satisfaction, he said — happy employees deliver better customer service; employees who feel valued give value. But companies such as Amazon deliver value in a way that a mom-and-pop business can’t. Not only are their goods and services usually cheaper, but they’re more convenient, ordered online and delivered to the customer’s front door.Access, convenience, and availability aren’t the only things changing the relationship between businesses and consumers. Large companies can rely on automation. Contracted labor arrangements, such as Uber and Airbnb, further complicate the equation. Building service businesses without owning anything is quickly becoming the norm.“These are profound changes and they have significant implications not only for our research, but for our lives and how we think about what’s going on,” Schlesinger said.How does this new economic reality play out in our neighborhoods and social interactions? What is its impact on work quality, and the quality of jobs in the United States?Mugford explores these questions in her class “Neighborhood Business Partnership,” a field course in which students work directly with local business owners facing some of these challenges.Mugford explained that large companies have some enormous advantages that make it very difficult for local businesses to compete, despite the community benefits of neighborhood businesses and face-to-face interactions.“One-third of private sector jobs are in small businesses,” she said. “But it’s really hard to be a small-businessperson.”For example, some of her students worked in a neighborhood bookstore in Roxbury that is trying to figure out how to keep its customers when they can buy any book they want online, usually at a lesser cost. But the bookstore is considered an anchor in the community and plays an important role in neighborhood stabilization, Mugford said.“We’re working on addressing these businesses one a time, highlighting the dilemmas and tensions and some of the things that have to happen at the local level,” she said. “But that comes with understanding the dilemmas associated with access to capital, because competing with these bigger firms requires access to that.”Even financial institutions such as small banks and credit unions must learn how to effectively leverage the local market in the growing online global-banking economy.“I am the branch manager at a local bank just down the street and feel the conversation about effective customer service is very important,” said Alicia Yeh, assistant vice president and branch manager of Rockland Trust in Allston. “It’s imperative not just to local business providers, but to the people in the neighborhood who utilize the businesses in their community.”So, what do small businesses need to compete? Mugford said the keys are education and support for owners, smart regulation that promotes growth, and loyal, local customers.“This talk allows us to share something significant for the community. It’s a beautiful alignment with the economic development of the neighborhood,” Robert Lue, faculty director of the Harvard Ed Portal, said in his opening remarks. “It’s a perfect example of that kind of true integration and co-creation that we feel is absolutely critical for the future of our neighborhood businesses.”last_img read more

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Love stinks

first_imgThe Museum of Broken Relationships is a collection of ordinary objects hung on walls, tucked under glass, backlit on pedestals: a toaster, a child’s pedal car, a handmade modem. A toilet-paper dispenser. A positive pregnancy stick. A positive drug test. A weathered ax. They come from Taipei, from Slovenia, from Colorado, from Manila. All donated, each accompanied by a story: In the 14 days of her holiday, every day I axed one piece of her furniture.One of the most popular items in the gift shop is the “Bad Memories Eraser,” an actual eraser sold in several shades. But in truth the museum is something closer to the psychic opposite of an eraser. Every object insists that something was, rather than trying to make it disappear. Donating an object to the museum permits surrender and permanence at once: you get it out of your home, and you make it immortal. She was a regional buyer for a grocer and that meant I got to try some great samples, reads the caption next to a box of maple-and-sea-salt popcorn. I miss her, her dog, and the samples, and can’t stand to have this fancy microwave popcorn in my house. The donor couldn’t stand to have it, but he also couldn’t bear to throw it away. He wanted to put it on a pedestal instead, honor it as the artifact of an ended era.,When I visited the museum in Zagreb, Croatia — where it occupies a baroque aristocratic home perched at the edge of Upper Town — I was two and a half years married, two months pregnant, and traveling on my own. Almost everyone else had come as part of a couple. The lobby was full of men waiting for wives and girlfriends who were spending longer with the exhibits. I imagined all these couples steeped in schadenfreude and fear: “This isn’t us. This could be us.” In the guest book, I saw one entry that said simply: “I should end my relationship, but I probably won’t,” and fingered my own wedding ring — as proof, for comfort — but couldn’t help imagining the ring as another exhibit, too.Before flying to Zagreb, I’d put out a call to my friends — What object would you donate to this museum? — and got descriptions I couldn’t have imagined: a clamshell drilled by a dental student, a shopping list, four black dresses, a single human hair, a mango candle, a penis-shaped gourd.The objects my friends described all reached toward obsolete past tenses: that time we dreamed the same dream. The objects were relics from those dreams, as the museum exhibits were relics from the dreams of strangers — attempts to insist that these dreams had left some residue behind.Walking through the museum felt less like voyeurism and more like collaboration. Strangers wanted their lives witnessed, and other strangers wanted to witness them. The curatorial notes quoted Roland Barthes: “Every passion, ultimately, has its spectator … [there is] no amorous oblation without a final theatre.” There was a democratic vibe to the place. Its premise implied that anyone’s story was worth telling, and worth listening to.,The Museum of Broken Relationships began with a breakup. Back in 2003, after Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić ended their relationship, they found themselves in the midst of a series of difficult conversations about how to divide their possessions. As Olinka put it: “The feeling of loss … represented the only thing left for us to share.” Over the kitchen table one night, they imagined an exhibit composed of all the detritus from breakups like their own, and when they finally created this exhibition — three years later — its first object was one salvaged from their own home: the mechanical windup rabbit they’d called Honey Bunny.Just over a decade later, the story of their breakup has become the museum’s myth of origins. “It was the strangest thing,” Olinka told me over coffee one morning. “The other day I was getting out of my car, right outside the museum, and I heard a tour guide telling a group of tourists about the bunny. He said: ‘It all started with a joke!’” Olinka wanted to tell the tour guide it hadn’t been a joke at all, that those early conversations had been deeply painful, but she realized that the story of her own breakup had become a public possession, subject to the retellings and interpretations of others. People took whatever they needed from it.When Olinka and Dražen finally found a permanent home for their exhibition, the space was in terrible shape: the first floor of an eighteenth-century palace in utter disrepair, perched near the top of a funicular railway. “We were a little bit crazy,” Olinka told me. “We had tunnel vision. Like when you fall in love.” Dražen finished the floors and painted the walls, restored the brick arches. He did such a great job that people kept asking Olinka: “Are you sure you wanted to break up with this guy?”That’s the pleasing irony of the museum’s premise: that in creating a museum from their breakup, Olinka and Dražen ended up forming an enduring partnership. From the museum coffee shop, the mechanical bunny was visible in its glass case — a presiding mascot and a patron saint. “People think that the bunny is our object,” Olinka told me. “But really the museum is our object. Everything that it’s become.”,These ordinary objects understood that a breakup is powerful because it saturates the banality of daily life, just as the relationship itself did: every errand, every annoying alarm-clock chirp, every late-night Netflix binge. Once love is gone, it’s gone everywhere. It’s a ghost suffusing daily life just as powerfully in its absence. A man leaves his shopping lists scattered across your days, cluttered with personality tics and gratuitous periods, poignant in their specificity: “lg. black trash bags” summoning that time the trash bags were too small, or “lg. onion,” the type necessary for a particular fish stew prepared on a particular humid summer evening.,“The museum has always been two steps ahead of us,” Olinka told me, explaining that it’s had a will of its own from the start, an impulse to exist beyond her and Dražen. In the decade after their first exhibition, the museum took many shapes: permanent installations in Zagreb and Los Angeles, a virtual museum comprising thousands of photographs and stories, and forty-six pop-up installations all over the world — from Buenos Aires to Boise, Singapore to Istanbul, Cape Town to South Korea, from the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam’s red-light district to the European Parliament in Brussels, all locally sourced, like an artisanal grocer, stocked with regional heartbreak.,I grew up in a family thick with divorces and overpopulated by remarriages: both sets of grandparents divorced, my mother’s twice; both my parents married three times; my oldest brother divorced by forty. Divorce seemed less like an aberration than an inevitable stage in the life cycle of any love.But in my family the ghosts of prior partners were rarely vengeful or embittered. My mother’s first husband was a lanky hippie with the kindest eyes who once brought me a dream catcher. My beloved aunt’s first husband was an artist who made masks from the dried palm fronds he gathered on beaches. These men enchanted me because they carried with them not only the residue of who my mom and aunt had been before I knew them, but also the spectral possibilities of who they might have become.Which is all to say: I grew up believing that relationships would probably end, but I also grew up with the firm belief that even after a relationship was over, it was still a part of you, and that this wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. When I asked my mother what object she would contribute to the museum, she chose a shirt she had bought in San Francisco, years before I was born, with the woman she had loved before she met my father.The gospel of serial monogamy could have you believe that every relationship was an imperfect trial run, useful only as preparation for the relationship that finally stuck. In this model, a family full of divorces was a family full of failure. But I grew up seeing them as something else, grew up seeing every self as an accumulation of its loves, like a Russian nesting doll that held all of those relationships inside.,My breakup with Dave, at the end of my twenties, mattered more than any other breakup ever had, and lasted longer — the loss itself, and its aftermath. Dave and I had spent much of our relationship trying to figure out if our relationship could work, and I thought that breaking up would liberate us from that pull-and-tug. It didn’t. We broke up, got back together, broke up again, then talked about getting married. Our split became my partner the way Dave had been my partner. There was an absence that held his shape, and it followed me everywhere.,In many ways, that relationship was another chapter in the unfolding story of my relationship with Dave, part of its epilogue. When the lawyer and I broke up, it felt less like a fresh sadness and more like a return to the sadness that was already there, missing the one I’d been missing all along. A few months later, I met the man I would marry.Before I left for Croatia, I thought of bringing the bottle of Crystal Pepsi the lawyer had given me, to donate to the museum as a memento of my last breakup before marriage. But I never put it in my luggage. Why did I want to keep it at home, on my bookshelf? It had something to do with wanting to acknowledge the man who’d given it to me, because I hadn’t given him enough credit while we were together. Keeping his last gift was a way of granting him credit in the aftermath.If I’m honest with myself, keeping that bottle of Crystal Pepsi isn’t just about honoring the man who gave it to me, or what we shared. It also has to do with enjoying that glimpse of sadness and dissolution, with holding on to some reminder of the pure, riveting feeling of being broken. These days my life is less about the sublime state of solitary sadness or fractured heartbreak and more about waking up each day and making sure I show up to my commitments. My days in Zagreb were about Skyping with my husband and emailing a good-morning video to my stepdaughter. They were about feeding the fetus inside me: Istrian fuzi with truffles, noodles in thick cream; sea bream with artichokes; something called a domestic pie; something called a vitamins salad.Life now is less about the electricity of thresholds and more about continuance, coming back and muddling through; less about the grand drama of ending and more about the daily work of salvage and sustenance. I keep the Crystal Pepsi because it’s a souvenir from the fifteen years between my first breakup and my last that I spent in a cycle of beginnings and endings, each one an opportunity for self-discovery and reinvention and transformative emotion; a way to feel infinite in the variety of possible selves that could come into being. I keep the Crystal Pepsi because I want some reminder of a self that felt volcanic and volatile — bursting into bliss, or into tears — and because I want to keep some proof of all the unlived lives, the ones that could have been.Jamison will be appearing in conversation with James Wood, critic and professor of the practice of literary criticism, Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Fong Auditorium at the Mahindra Humanities Center. Excerpt from “Make it Scream, Make it Burn” by Leslie Jamison. Copyright © 2019 by Leslie Jamison. Available from Little, Brown and Company, an imprint of Hachette Book Group Inc. Sure, your heart thumps, but let’s look at what’s happening physically and psychologically When love and science double date Propelled by her viral short story, Kristen Roupenian publishes her first collection Leslie Jamison ’04: ‘There was an earlier version of myself that believed all great storytelling had to come from radical dysfunction’ Related The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. A boozy writer who crossed out the adjective Writing about what scares youlast_img read more

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