Category: kpkhrpgp

Don’t miss the biggest night in the bakery calendar

first_imgThe biggest night in the bakery calendar – the Baking Industry Awards – is just a few weeks away.Don’t delay if you haven’t booked your place at this glittering occasion, as we are down to the last few tickets.Taking place on 4 September at the Royal Lancaster, London, the awards ceremony will be attended by some of the biggest names in the industry and is a fantastic chance to network with your peers.The awards recognise stand-out businesses, individuals and products across categories including Bakery Manufacturer of the Year, Craft Bakery Business of the Year and Supermarket Bakery Business of the Year. Other categories also recognise stand-out individuals and products.This year’s event is hosted by former Pussycat Doll Ashley Roberts – a finalist on last year’s Strictly Come Dancing – and features a dazzling ‘Intergalactic’ theme.The night will begin with a drinks reception, followed by a three-course dinner, then the awards ceremony itself. Guests can enjoy entertainment into the wee hours with hundreds of other bakery delegates.To book tickets to the ceremonyGo to bakeryawards.co.uk and click on the ‘Book Your Tickets’ buttonWhen: Wednesday 4 September 2019Where: Royal Lancaster, Lancaster Terrace, LondonTickets: £295 a ticket, table of 10: £2,690Tickets sell out fast, so apply early to [email protected] or call 01293 846593.(Finalists and partners attend free)last_img read more

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Aqueous Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Extended “Complex Pt. II” From Recent Boston Show [Watch]

first_imgToday, Aqueous has released pro-shot footage of “Complex Pt. II” from their recent show at Cambridge, MA’s Sinclair on October 26th.The band opened up their first set with fan-favorite “Kitty Chaser (Explosions)” and took the jam deep, with lead guitarist Mike Gantzer firing off on all cylinders. The band then offered up a live debut of Color Wheel track”Split The Difference” before working through a smoothly segued “Dave’s Song” into “How High You Fly”. The quartet mustered up a sandwich of “Second Sight” > Oysterhead‘s “Pseudo Suicide” > “Second Sight” to bring their first set at The Sinclair to a close.Following a brief set break, Aqueous returned to open their second set with “Mosquito Valley Pt. I”, followed by the “Don’t Do It”, with Ganzter shining on lead vocals. Aqueous then offered up their second Color Wheel live debut of the night with “Good Enough” before taking off into an exploratory, psychedelic journey with “Complex Pt. II”.You can watch pro-shot video of Aqueous’ 18-minute rendition of “Complex Pt. II” from Boston below courtesy of MKDevo:Aqueous – “Complex Pt. II” [Pro-Shot][Video: Aqueous]Following the complex jam, the band moved into “Say It Again”, which featured teases of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean”, before closing their second set with “Triangle”. “They’re Calling For Ya” served as the evening’s encore.Aqueous continues their extensive fall tour in the Midwest this week with stops at Ann Arbor, MI’s Blind Pig (11/28); Chicago, IL’s Chop Shop (11/29); Milwaukee, WI’s The Miramar (11/30); and Minneapolis, MN’s 7th Street Entry (12/1). For a full list of Aqueous’ upcoming tour dates, head over to the band’s website here.Setlist: Aqueous | The Sinclair | Cambridge, MA | 10/26/2018Set One: Kitty Chaser (Explosions) > Split the Difference[1], Dave’s Song > How High You Fly, Second Sight > Pseudo Suicide> Second SightSet Two: Mosquito Valley Pt. I > Don’t Do It, Good Enough[1] > Complex Pt. II, Say it Again[2], TriangleEncore: They’re Calling for YaNotes:[1] Live Debut[2] Billie Jean (Michael Jackson) teaselast_img read more

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New lactation room at Widener Library

first_img Read Full Story For nursing mothers returning to work or pursing their education, having a  private space to allow them to continue breast-feeding their child can help ease the transition.As part of Harvard’s commitment to supporting a mother’s choice to breast-feed, a new lactation room has opened on the ground floor of Widener Library. The new room joins several other lactation spaces located across the University, but represents the first lactation room in the yard.Christina Linklater, a cataloguer in Houghton Library, encouraged the creation of the new room. “I saw advocating for a new lactation room as a small but real thing I could do to soften the potentially difficult experience of leaving an infant to come back to work, for myself and for other new moms,” said Linklater.Harvard College Library and Harvard University Office of Work/Life have partnered to provide the space the ground floor of Widener. It is located around the corner from the staff elevator in the Widener Cafe.  Any Harvard-affiliated nursing mother (faculty, staff, student, breast-feeding spouse/partner) can register to use the Widener lactation room. The room has a hospital-grade Medela pump, for which you will need to provide your own Medela/Lactina attachments.Contact Jeanette Sanchez  at 617-495-3721, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, for more information and to register to use the room.More information about Harvard’s new parents program can be found on HARvie.last_img read more

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Go beyond marketing and serve Hispanic consumers

first_imgEvery year, National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) feels like a good moment for credit unions to consider how they might reach this growing market. It’s easy to see why: The Hispanic population topped 60 million in 2019, up 20% since 2010, according to 2019 population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. About one in five American consumers identifies as Hispanic. This is a vital and growing market.But this year, we’re proposing we take things a step further. We believe credit unions can look beyond marketing and think about how they actually serve Hispanic members. Hispanic American consumers need more than effective outreach and clever advertising. They need partners in their financial success.A Word About Our PerspectiveThanks to our work with CO-OP’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion council, we’re enthusiastic advocates for reaching out and meeting the needs of diverse communities. We believe there’s strength in diversity and the complex understanding that comes from multiple life experiences and perspectives in the workplace. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Avian flu deaths reported in Indonesia, China

first_imgJan 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A 22-year-old chicken seller in Indonesia died yesterday after testing positive for avian influenza, and a young Chinese woman whose case was reported previously also succumbed to the disease this week.The Indonesian man died after a week of hospitalization, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report quoting Ilham Patu of the Sulianti Saroso Hospital in Jakarta.Local testing showed he had the H5N1 avian flu virus, the story said. If his case is confirmed by tests at a Hong Kong lab accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO), he will be counted as the 15th Indonesian to die of avian flu.The Chinese victim was a 29-year-old woman from Chengdu City in the south-central province of Sichuan, the WHO reported on Jan 25. She became ill Jan 12 and died Jan 23. Some previous reports had listed her age as 36.She worked in a dry-goods shop and had no reported exposure to sick birds, the WHO said. Her case was the second one in China so far this year. The first case was also in Sichuan province but was about 150 kilometers from the latest one. No poultry outbreaks had been reported in the areas where the two patients lived, though one occurred elsewhere in the province in December.China has had 10 human cases of H5N1 avian flu, with 7 deaths, the WHO said. The cases began last November.In other news, Turkish health officials today said a British lab had confirmed 12 of the 21 human H5N1 cases reported in Turkey, according to an AFP report.On the basis of in-country tests, Turkey has had 21 human cases, including 4 deaths, all occurring this month. The WHO has mentioned those numbers in reports but has not yet added them to its case count, pending confirmation by outside labs. The agency currently lists a global total of 152 cases with 83 deaths.The Turkish health ministry said 14 H5N1 patients had recovered and been released from hospitals, while three were still being treated, according to AFP. “It is encouraging that there have been no new cases [since January 17], but precautions should continue,” the ministry was quoted as saying.The apparent mortality rate in Turkey so far is much lower than in East Asia, where it has been more than 50%. A United Nations official said today that scientists are studying whether this means the virus is becoming less deadly in humans, according to a Reuters report.”The question being asked is, ‘Are these people having a milder form of the disease and what does that mean?'” said David Nabarro, the UN’s coordinator for avian and pandemic flu. He made the comments at a meeting sponsored by the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.Nabarro said the lower death rate in Turkey does not mean a reduced risk of a pandemic. “It simply is telling us that the virus may be changing the way it interacts with humans. It does not tell us that the risk of a mutation that causes the pandemic is increasing or decreasing,” he told Reuters.At the same meeting in Davos, business mogul Richard Branson predicted that a flu pandemic could halt up to 70% of commercial air traffic, according to another Reuters report.”If it happens, an airline is going to have 50 percent of its planes grounded, maybe more—60, 70 percent,” he said. Branson is the founder of Virgin Atlantic Airways and other carriers, the story said.In other developments, a wild bird called a magpie robin was positive for an H5 virus in preliminary testing in Hong Kong, according to AFP. Another magpie robin in Hong Kong tested positive for an H5N1 virus last week.See also:Jan 25 WHO report on fatal human case in Chinahttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_01_25a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Nine-year-old is China’s 10th avian flu victim

first_imgMar 8, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – China reported today that a 9-year-old girl died 2 days ago of H5N1 avian influenza, becoming the country’s 10th person to succumb to the virus.The girl, whose case was announced Feb 27, lived in the eastern province of Zhejiang, the World Health Organization (WHO) said. She fell ill on Feb 10 and was in critical condition by the time her case was made public.China has had 15 confirmed human cases of avian flu. With the girl’s case, the global death toll has increased to 96 out of 175 cases, by the WHO’s count.The girl’s case, along with that of a 32-year-old man who died Mar 2, has prompted questions about how people are getting infected, according to a Reuters report published today.No bird outbreaks of H5N1 have been reported in Zhejiang in recent months, but the girl fell ill after visiting relatives in Anhui province who owned some chickens, some of which were sick, according to earlier reports.The 32-year-old victim was from Guangdong province and lived in an urban area with no reported bird outbreaks, Reuters reported. The story said he was believed to have been exposed to the virus at a poultry market.Zhong Nanshan, director of the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, suggested that both victims might have caught the virus from chickens that were carrying it asymptomatically, according to Reuters.Meanwhile, a top Chinese health official was quoted today as saying that China’s human victims of avian flu had “defective” immune systems. A Bloomberg News story said the comments by Wang Longde, vice minister of health, were reported by the Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post.Wang said the government had studied several cases, but he gave no details, according to the report. The Bloomberg story stated that Wang “said the victims had ‘defective’ immune systems and the general public shouldn’t panic.”However, published scientific reports have not pointed to weak immunity as a common risk factor in human cases. (See link to CIDRAP overview of avian influenza, below.)A WHO official, Aphaluck Bhatiasevi, told the Hong Kong newspaper there is no scientific evidence that infection is linked to immunity. She said cases have been associated with contact with birds, not strength or weakness.Also today, the WHO reported that a 3-day conference in Geneva produced progress on plans for responding quickly to early signs of a flu pandemic. In a news release, the agency said the operational plan “moved closer to final form” as the meeting of 70 public health experts ended today.The results of the meeting will be circulated for review and published as soon as they are ready, the WHO promised.See also:CIDRAP overview of avian influenza and its implications for human diseaselast_img read more

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Pandemic vaccine–making capacity rising, but still short

first_imgFeb 24, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The world’s capacity to produce vaccines for an influenza pandemic has risen sharply in the past 2 years, but it would still take an estimated 4 years to meet the global demand if a pandemic emerged now, according to a report from an international strategy consulting firm.The report was prepared by the New York City–based firm Oliver Wyman in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA).”Pandemic vaccine production capacity has increased by 300 percent over the last two years, largely driven by improvements in production yields and dosage-sparing technologies,” Oliver Wyman and the IFPMA stated in a news release. The company did not release the full report.If a pandemic emerged this year, the most likely case is that manufacturers could produce 2.5 billion doses in the first 12 months after they received the production strain, the firm said. It would take 4 years to produce enough to meet total global demand, meaning two doses for each of the world’s 6.7 billion people.In the best case, the industry could produce 7.7 billion doses in the first 12 months of a pandemic and could meet global demand in 1½ years, the firm said.The company predicts that annual pandemic vaccine production capacity will rise to somewhere between 5 billion and 14.5 billion doses over the next 5 years. That means the time needed to meet global demand could drop to 2½ years in the most likely case or 1 year in the best case.The firm also expects that surplus vaccine production capacity—above and beyond the demand for seasonal flu vaccine and prepandemic vaccine stockpiling—will increase over the next 5 years, to between 2.6 billion and 5.4 billion annual doses. How much the capacity actually rises is likely to depend on the demand for both seasonal and prepandemic vaccines, officials said.”I think this is a mixed story,” Adam Sabow, the Wyman partner who led the preparation of the report, told CIDRAP News. “This is good if there’s new seasonal [flu vaccine] demand or if there’s demand for H5N1 vaccine during the interpandemic period for efforts such as stockpiling.”However, if there isn’t demand, there’s a possibility that some of that capacity could be rationalized. By that we mean that capacity may either be shut down or may be redeployed for other purposes,” which would reduce the ability to respond quickly to a pandemic.He noted that there is some demand for H5N1 prepandemic vaccines, as some countries are stockpiling them, while the WHO is working on designing a global H5N1 vaccine stockpile. He said his firm is working with the WHO on that project.Alicia D. Greenidge, director-general of the IFPMA, said member companies are committed to working with the WHO and governments to ensure the best use of surplus vaccine capacity to prepare for a pandemic. “The findings suggest that the use of stockpiled H5N1-based vaccines, followed by pandemic vaccine as soon as these become available, offers a realistic strategy to address this significant threat,” she commented in the Wyman news release.Agreement on numbersSabow said that to estimate vaccine production capacity, his firm included 44 existing and planned vaccine production facilities, representing “the vast majority” of such facilities.He said the report marks a first: “This study is the first time that all the major actors have come together to agree on the capacity numbers for pandemic influenza. There’s historically been a debate about the numbers that has taken away from the policy discussion. We’re excited about this because the global health community has come together and agreed on the numbers and now can move on to the policy implications.”The report estimates that once a pandemic is recognized, it will take 4 months to develop, produce, and begin distributing a specific vaccine for it. Sabow said the estimate assumes the use of conventional egg-based production.”We worked very closely with the WHO and the manufacturers to break down the individual parameters of that lead time, and a lot of work has been done to make that lead time as short as possible,” he said. “This is currently the best information that our group has analyzed with regard to a realistic time at the point of a pandemic.”Egg-based and cell-based productionAlthough cell culture technology has been described as a faster and more flexible method for making flu vaccine, Sabow said the time needed to start making a pandemic vaccine would probably be about the same with cell culture production.”We did model this for both egg-based and cell-based production, and the expectation is that cell-based production would have a relatively similar time frame,” he said.While most flu vaccine production remains egg-based, the amount of cell-based production capacity is expected to increase considerably in the next 5 years, Sabow noted.One of the uncertainties is what will happen to egg-base production capacity as cell-based capacity comes on line, particularly if demand for seasonal and prepandemic vaccines is lacking. “If there isn’t demand, some of that egg-based capacity may be rationalized,” he said.A chart released by Wyman gives more specific estimates of how much vaccine could be produced in the first few months of a pandemic. It indicates that once a pandemic is declared, it will take 3 to 4 weeks to create a reference strain for vaccine production.In the most likely case, production would reach 340 million doses at 4 months after vaccine makers receive the reference strain, according to the chart. Production would reach 580 million doses at 5 months, 860 million doses at 6 months, and 2.45 billion doses at 12 months.Possible constraintsSabow said the Wyman analysis did not consider potential economic constraints on vaccine production and distribution or the possible effects of supply-chain disruptions, which many experts regard as likely during a pandemic.”The intent of our work was to say, based on the production capabilities of those facilities, what do we think the overall production looks like at the point of a pandemic,” he said. “We did not analyze what the financial implications would be or whether there would be funding for production or who would have access to it, and did not look at the possible supply-chain issues. That was not part of this analysis.”Sabow said the projections related to production of prepandemic vaccine stockpiling refer to H5N1 vaccines, but the estimates of production of actual pandemic vaccines do not assume that the next pandemic virus will be an H5N1 strain. “This is based on the history of producing a range of different influenza vaccine strains,” he said.See also: Oct 26, 2007, CIDRAP News report “The pandemic vaccine puzzle, part 2: Vaccine production capacity falls far short”last_img read more

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Liverpool offices

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​Luxembourg reserve fund names managers for €500m global property push

first_imgOverall, the fund has a 8.5% strategic allocation to property, but currently falls far short of its 5% domestic target and at the end of 2014 only had €247m in Luxembourgish real estate.A project that will see it approach its 5% target, the ’Cité de la sécurité sociale’, is currently under development, and will see the construction of an office complex to house the domestic social security office. The fund decided last year to build up its global exposure through holdings in real estate funds to further diversify its portfolio and increase exposure to inflation-linked assets.To date, the portfolio, which returned 10.96% last year, has largely been split between fixed income – accounting for nearly 60% of assets – and equities (38.4%). Luxembourg’s €14.3bn pension reserve fund has hired two managers to oversee its €500m push into global real estate.The Fonds de Compensation commun au régime général de pension (FDC) announced its board of directors had settled on Aviva Investors and CBRE Global Investment Partners as its inaugural managers, after first tendering the vacancies in August.Each manager will be handed €250m for an unlisted global real estate mandate, part of FDC’s attempt to meet its 3.5% strategic allocation to property outside the Grand Duchy.In addition to appointing Aviva Investors and CBRE, UBS Asset Management has been appointed as standby manager, should either of the two managers seeded need to be replaced.last_img read more

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MarCy17: A Long Way Ahead for Shipping to Gain Cyber Maturity

first_imgThe shipping industry should take protective measures to be ‘cyber mature’, particularly as personal, confidential and operational information is at risk, it was concluded at a panel discussion held in the framework of the Maritime Cyprus 2017 conference in Limassol. As explained, shipping constitutes a target for cyber attacks since a lot of information and money is at stake.“Cybersecurity sustainable investments should be materialiased and the level of cyber maturity should be continuously reinforced as the cybersecurity issue needs to be a continuous improvement process,” it was highlighted at the panel.What is more, panelists pointed out that cyber risk is here to stay for both companies and ships but cyber risk management is possible and achievable.On novel ship design, it was mentioned that newly designed ships have additional and innovative equipment on board that makes them more efficient. This equipment will lead to decreased air emissions from such new ships. The role of the shipowners during the design stage and of the classification societies during the building stage of new ships was also discussed.With regard to digitalization, it was emphasized that the industry needs to be ready to embrace its benefits and prepare for the threats it poses such as cyber security. The importance of preparing employees and crews for future technologies through training was stressed.Autonomous ships will become a reality but we should not expect to see unmanned ships for many years to come since seafarers on board cannot be replaced by vulnerable digital systems, according to the panelists.Panelists included Steffen Gau, Marine Business Development New Construction of Lloyd’s Register Marine and Offshore covering the discussion on novel ship designs, Cynthia Hudson, CEO of HudsonAnalytix covering the discussion on cyber security, and George Ward, Project Support Manager of ECDIS talking about digitalization.last_img read more

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