Category: kpkhrpgp

Intercomparison of various measurements of thermal plasma densities at and near the plasmapause

first_imgFour methods of investigating the thermal plasma density near the plasmapause have been intercompared for the period 1 to 15 July 1972. These methods are whistlers, the double floating probe on Explorer 45, three IMP I plasma wave signatures and observations made aboard both Prognoz 1 and Prognoz 2. Explorer 45 data have provided new information on the plasmapause bulge which, during this period, occurs at 16 L.T. This displacement from the accepted time of 18 L.T. or even later is substantiated by the Russian satellites. All methods give the result that the plasmapause is found at an electron number density somewhere between 20 and 120 cm−3 or, alternatively, at 60 cm−3, to within a factor of 2.last_img read more

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UK: Royal Navy’s Largest Warship Arrives to Port of Sunderland

first_img View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: Royal Navy’s Largest Warship Arrives to Port of Sunderland UK: Royal Navy’s Largest Warship Arrives to Port of Sunderland View post tag: Warship View post tag: Sunderland Training & Education May 25, 2012 View post tag: Royal View post tag: Navy View post tag: port View post tag: to View post tag: largest View post tag: Naval View post tag: Arrives The mighty HMS Ocean, the Royal Navy’s largest warship, will visit her affiliated city of Sunderland from May 24-28 and be open to visitors from the local community on Sunday 27 May.Berthing alongside at Corporation Quay, Port of Sunderland on Thursday, the ship will spend a very busy few days in the north east city.HMS Ocean has recently completed a pre-Olympics security exercise in London. During the games, she will return to the Thames, mooring at Greenwich, and will play a central role in the Armed Forces support to the police in ensuring the games are safe and secure for everyone to enjoy.In addition to being a platform for Royal Navy and Army Air Corps Lynx helicopters, the ship will also accommodate military personnel who are providing security for the equestrian events at Greenwich Park.This weekend’s activities kick off on Friday during the day, when around 100 young people will join the Royal Marines Commando Recruitment Team on board the ship. The day’s events will give everyone a small taste of life as part of the elite Royal Marines.Participants will have the opportunity to try out skills such as unarmed combat, using a climbing wall and some rigorous physical training packages which the commandos use to hone and then maintain peak fitness.Saturday dawns to a day of honour for all the crew when they take to the streets of Sunderland to exercise their Freedom of the City – a ceremonial spectacle with drums beating and bayonets fixed, it promises to be a visual treat for locals lining the route.The parade forms up at the rear of Sunderland Civic Centre, Burdon Road at 3pm and proceeds to the war memorial where they will be reviewed by the Mayor, Councillor Iain Kay.In recognition of the affiliation with the city and in hour to renew the honour bestowed in 2004, the engraved silver canister housing the Freedom Proclamation will be presented to the ship’s Commanding Officer, Captain Andrew Betton, before the parade commander request permission to exercise HMS Ocean’s right to parade through the city.Led by The Band of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, the ship’s company begins the parade through the city at 4pm, up Fawcett Street and left onto High Street West.Then proceeding onto Union Street and through the pedestrian area, the parade later returns to Burdon Road and salutes the Mayor before making their way back up to the civic centre. The Freedom Parade culminates in a reception hosted by Sunderland City Council in the Pottery Gallery of the Museum and Sunderland Winter Gardens.On Sunday locals will have an opportunity to visit HMS Ocean when she opens her gangway to visitors from 10am-4pm. Access to the ship on Corporation Quay will be via the Low Street entrance. Families with vehicles are advised to seek parking away from the immediate vicinity of the port, which will be open to pedestrians only. Parking on Low Street will be for residents only.Visitors will be able to tour the flight deck, hangar and vehicle, and have the opportunity to speak to members of Ocean’s crew about their experiences and life in the modern Royal Navy. There will also be a number of attractions on the jetty, including a climbing wall and children’s assault course hosted by the Royal Marines.In addition to all of that, the ship will also hope a number of organised tours for various local organisations and youth groups, including 21st Sunderland Sea Scouts.Like any military organisation, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines promote sport and physical fitness as an important part of maintaining morale and Sunderland City Council’s events team has been busy to line up an impressive range of activities from a golf tournament at Wearside Golf Club to a friendly rugby match to compete against Sunderland RFC.And the ship’s football team, known as ‘Ocean’s Eleven’ will play the Nissan 2011 Interdepartmental team finalists on Sunday afternoon at the Nissan Sport and Social Conference Centre on Washington Road, kicking off at 2pm.In addition, a kind-hearted group of sailors and marines are planning to raise money for both the Grace House North East Children’s Hospice, as well as the Royal Navy and Royal Marines Charity, when they set out with a small head start on Sunday morning to race the ship over the 500 miles back to Plymouth on their bikes.“We are thoroughly looking forward to visiting our adopted home,” said HMS Ocean’s Commanding Officer, Captain Andrew Betton.“ We are hugely honoured to be able to exercise our Freedom of the City of Sunderland and I hope that members of the public will come along to support the ship’s company while we parade through the streets.“And then it will be our turn to give something back when we open the gangway to the public on Sunday – I know that my crew is already looking forward to welcoming as many people as possible and sharing their pride in Sunderland’s adopted ship.”An amphibious assault ship, HMS Ocean is designed to deliver troops to the centre of the action by helicopter or by landing craft – there are six helicopter operating spots on the flight deck and the hangar can hold many more aircraft. The ship also has its own Royal Marine assault squadron and carries four Mk5 landing craft.HMS Ocean played a key role in support of the UN Security Council Resolution in Libya last year, acting as the base for the Army’s Apache attack helicopters and Royal Navy’s Sea King surveillance helicopters.The Apache gunships flying from HMS Ocean complemented the RAF jets, delivering additional precision strike capability with considerable success. Over the course of the operation, the Apache crews from 656 Squadron Army Air Corps attacked Libyan military vehicles, installations and communications equipment.Built on the Clyde by Kvaerner Govan, the ship was launched in October 1995, and named by Her Majesty the Queen on February 20 1998. HMS Ocean was commissioned into the Fleet in September 1998 and is the largest warship in the Royal Navy.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , May 25, 2012; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: of Share this articlelast_img read more

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Budget Finalized In Last Hours Of Legislative Session, Democrats Say Indiana Deserves More

first_imgRepublican leaders touted the bill in its final hours for its expansive appropriations for K-12 education, which added up to a $763 million investment overall, and its ability to maintain over $2 billion in reserves or 11.8 percent of the total state budget.The budget also provides $500 million across the biennium to the Indiana Department of Child Services, $5.1 billion to the state’s Medicaid program and, among other adjustments, increases to the per day allotment for county jail managers from $35 to $37.5 in fiscal year 2020 and $40 in fiscal year 2021.But frustration was clear among some Democrats, as reflected in the party-line votes in each chamber, with the budget passing 41-8 in the Senate and 67-31 in the House.Well before voting machines opened, however, individual Democrats, including Rep. Gregory Porter, D-Indianapolis, said they would continue to oppose the measure. Porter originally sat on a conference committee for HB 1001, but Bosma removed him Wednesday, appointing House Ways and Means Co-Chair Tim Brown, R-Crawfordsville, as his replacement.“I wasn’t going to sign it,” Porter said. “It doesn’t meet the needs of all Hoosiers.” Democrats in both chambers proposed an array of revisions to the budget since it was first introduced in January, including everything from tax exemptions for female hygiene products and college textbooks to proposals to set a minimum teacher salary across all of Indiana’s school districts.But virtually none were incorporated in the final version. According to a press release issued by Senate Democrats Wednesday, all amendments proposed to HB 1001 by Senate Democrats were removed in the final version.First-year Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Ryan Mishler, R-Bremen, attempted to offer a reminder to his Democratic counterparts as they listed off programs lost in the final version.“We all made sacrifices to push money to K-12,” he said.Republican leadership came to his defense, with Sen. Randall Head, R-Logansport, speaking about his own difficult experiences alongside Mishler and the Senate Appropriations Committee.“It seemed to me all along that we were faced with a series of bad choices, especially when revenue came in lower than expected,” Head said, referring to a forecast by the State Budget Agency published last week that revealed a $100 million shortfall in the original budget plan caused by less-than-expected revenue collection and $60 million in new Medicaid costs. “There’s no way a budget can make everybody happy, but you did the best you could for the most people possible.”Still, colleagues like Sen. Jean Breaux, D-Indianapolis, condemned the budget plan and what they say is a lack of consideration for programs that could help Indiana’s underserved.“I was asking for 0.00006 percent of the budget to radically reduce Indiana’s outrageously high infant mortality rates, something the governor outlined as part of his 2019 agenda,” Breaux said in a written statement about her proposal to use Medicaid to help pay for doula services for low-income pregnant mothers. Doulas help prepare pregnant women for labor and motherhood through education and coaching.“However,” Breaux’s statement continued, “the supermajority seems to think that saving the lives of Hoosier women and children is insignificant.”Sen. Karen Tallian, D-Portage, pointed to Breaux’s doula program as one of several examples removed from the final biennium budget in her last formal speech on the topic.“Those little bits of money are really important to some small programs that have been nonchalantly dismissed,” Tallian said. “Do I just get to the blame the House, or the administration? I don’t know. I don’t know who made all these cuts.”Her final plea to her majority-party colleagues was even blunter: “What the heck? We pay taxes. We expect things.”FOOTNOTE: Erica Irish is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students. Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Budget Finalized In Last Hours Of Session, Democrats Say Indiana Deserves MoreBy Erica IrishTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS—Edging into the late evening Wednesday and ending in party-line votes, lawmakers approved Indiana’s next two-year budget, totaling $34.6 billion for dozens of state-funded programs.House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, said Wednesday afternoon lawmakers were ready to put the issue to rest and anticipated few changes after a conference committee published a report Tuesday. The debate about what programs should have been addressed in the biennium budget outlined in House Bill 1001 dominated the final hours of the session.last_img read more

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Don’t miss the biggest night in the bakery calendar

first_imgThe biggest night in the bakery calendar – the Baking Industry Awards – is just a few weeks away.Don’t delay if you haven’t booked your place at this glittering occasion, as we are down to the last few tickets.Taking place on 4 September at the Royal Lancaster, London, the awards ceremony will be attended by some of the biggest names in the industry and is a fantastic chance to network with your peers.The awards recognise stand-out businesses, individuals and products across categories including Bakery Manufacturer of the Year, Craft Bakery Business of the Year and Supermarket Bakery Business of the Year. Other categories also recognise stand-out individuals and products.This year’s event is hosted by former Pussycat Doll Ashley Roberts – a finalist on last year’s Strictly Come Dancing – and features a dazzling ‘Intergalactic’ theme.The night will begin with a drinks reception, followed by a three-course dinner, then the awards ceremony itself. Guests can enjoy entertainment into the wee hours with hundreds of other bakery delegates.To book tickets to the ceremonyGo to bakeryawards.co.uk and click on the ‘Book Your Tickets’ buttonWhen: Wednesday 4 September 2019Where: Royal Lancaster, Lancaster Terrace, LondonTickets: £295 a ticket, table of 10: £2,690Tickets sell out fast, so apply early to [email protected] or call 01293 846593.(Finalists and partners attend free)last_img read more

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Aqueous Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Extended “Complex Pt. II” From Recent Boston Show [Watch]

first_imgToday, Aqueous has released pro-shot footage of “Complex Pt. II” from their recent show at Cambridge, MA’s Sinclair on October 26th.The band opened up their first set with fan-favorite “Kitty Chaser (Explosions)” and took the jam deep, with lead guitarist Mike Gantzer firing off on all cylinders. The band then offered up a live debut of Color Wheel track”Split The Difference” before working through a smoothly segued “Dave’s Song” into “How High You Fly”. The quartet mustered up a sandwich of “Second Sight” > Oysterhead‘s “Pseudo Suicide” > “Second Sight” to bring their first set at The Sinclair to a close.Following a brief set break, Aqueous returned to open their second set with “Mosquito Valley Pt. I”, followed by the “Don’t Do It”, with Ganzter shining on lead vocals. Aqueous then offered up their second Color Wheel live debut of the night with “Good Enough” before taking off into an exploratory, psychedelic journey with “Complex Pt. II”.You can watch pro-shot video of Aqueous’ 18-minute rendition of “Complex Pt. II” from Boston below courtesy of MKDevo:Aqueous – “Complex Pt. II” [Pro-Shot][Video: Aqueous]Following the complex jam, the band moved into “Say It Again”, which featured teases of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean”, before closing their second set with “Triangle”. “They’re Calling For Ya” served as the evening’s encore.Aqueous continues their extensive fall tour in the Midwest this week with stops at Ann Arbor, MI’s Blind Pig (11/28); Chicago, IL’s Chop Shop (11/29); Milwaukee, WI’s The Miramar (11/30); and Minneapolis, MN’s 7th Street Entry (12/1). For a full list of Aqueous’ upcoming tour dates, head over to the band’s website here.Setlist: Aqueous | The Sinclair | Cambridge, MA | 10/26/2018Set One: Kitty Chaser (Explosions) > Split the Difference[1], Dave’s Song > How High You Fly, Second Sight > Pseudo Suicide> Second SightSet Two: Mosquito Valley Pt. I > Don’t Do It, Good Enough[1] > Complex Pt. II, Say it Again[2], TriangleEncore: They’re Calling for YaNotes:[1] Live Debut[2] Billie Jean (Michael Jackson) teaselast_img read more

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New lactation room at Widener Library

first_img Read Full Story For nursing mothers returning to work or pursing their education, having a  private space to allow them to continue breast-feeding their child can help ease the transition.As part of Harvard’s commitment to supporting a mother’s choice to breast-feed, a new lactation room has opened on the ground floor of Widener Library. The new room joins several other lactation spaces located across the University, but represents the first lactation room in the yard.Christina Linklater, a cataloguer in Houghton Library, encouraged the creation of the new room. “I saw advocating for a new lactation room as a small but real thing I could do to soften the potentially difficult experience of leaving an infant to come back to work, for myself and for other new moms,” said Linklater.Harvard College Library and Harvard University Office of Work/Life have partnered to provide the space the ground floor of Widener. It is located around the corner from the staff elevator in the Widener Cafe.  Any Harvard-affiliated nursing mother (faculty, staff, student, breast-feeding spouse/partner) can register to use the Widener lactation room. The room has a hospital-grade Medela pump, for which you will need to provide your own Medela/Lactina attachments.Contact Jeanette Sanchez  at 617-495-3721, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, for more information and to register to use the room.More information about Harvard’s new parents program can be found on HARvie.last_img read more

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Go beyond marketing and serve Hispanic consumers

first_imgEvery year, National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) feels like a good moment for credit unions to consider how they might reach this growing market. It’s easy to see why: The Hispanic population topped 60 million in 2019, up 20% since 2010, according to 2019 population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. About one in five American consumers identifies as Hispanic. This is a vital and growing market.But this year, we’re proposing we take things a step further. We believe credit unions can look beyond marketing and think about how they actually serve Hispanic members. Hispanic American consumers need more than effective outreach and clever advertising. They need partners in their financial success.A Word About Our PerspectiveThanks to our work with CO-OP’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion council, we’re enthusiastic advocates for reaching out and meeting the needs of diverse communities. We believe there’s strength in diversity and the complex understanding that comes from multiple life experiences and perspectives in the workplace. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Avian flu deaths reported in Indonesia, China

first_imgJan 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A 22-year-old chicken seller in Indonesia died yesterday after testing positive for avian influenza, and a young Chinese woman whose case was reported previously also succumbed to the disease this week.The Indonesian man died after a week of hospitalization, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report quoting Ilham Patu of the Sulianti Saroso Hospital in Jakarta.Local testing showed he had the H5N1 avian flu virus, the story said. If his case is confirmed by tests at a Hong Kong lab accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO), he will be counted as the 15th Indonesian to die of avian flu.The Chinese victim was a 29-year-old woman from Chengdu City in the south-central province of Sichuan, the WHO reported on Jan 25. She became ill Jan 12 and died Jan 23. Some previous reports had listed her age as 36.She worked in a dry-goods shop and had no reported exposure to sick birds, the WHO said. Her case was the second one in China so far this year. The first case was also in Sichuan province but was about 150 kilometers from the latest one. No poultry outbreaks had been reported in the areas where the two patients lived, though one occurred elsewhere in the province in December.China has had 10 human cases of H5N1 avian flu, with 7 deaths, the WHO said. The cases began last November.In other news, Turkish health officials today said a British lab had confirmed 12 of the 21 human H5N1 cases reported in Turkey, according to an AFP report.On the basis of in-country tests, Turkey has had 21 human cases, including 4 deaths, all occurring this month. The WHO has mentioned those numbers in reports but has not yet added them to its case count, pending confirmation by outside labs. The agency currently lists a global total of 152 cases with 83 deaths.The Turkish health ministry said 14 H5N1 patients had recovered and been released from hospitals, while three were still being treated, according to AFP. “It is encouraging that there have been no new cases [since January 17], but precautions should continue,” the ministry was quoted as saying.The apparent mortality rate in Turkey so far is much lower than in East Asia, where it has been more than 50%. A United Nations official said today that scientists are studying whether this means the virus is becoming less deadly in humans, according to a Reuters report.”The question being asked is, ‘Are these people having a milder form of the disease and what does that mean?'” said David Nabarro, the UN’s coordinator for avian and pandemic flu. He made the comments at a meeting sponsored by the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.Nabarro said the lower death rate in Turkey does not mean a reduced risk of a pandemic. “It simply is telling us that the virus may be changing the way it interacts with humans. It does not tell us that the risk of a mutation that causes the pandemic is increasing or decreasing,” he told Reuters.At the same meeting in Davos, business mogul Richard Branson predicted that a flu pandemic could halt up to 70% of commercial air traffic, according to another Reuters report.”If it happens, an airline is going to have 50 percent of its planes grounded, maybe more—60, 70 percent,” he said. Branson is the founder of Virgin Atlantic Airways and other carriers, the story said.In other developments, a wild bird called a magpie robin was positive for an H5 virus in preliminary testing in Hong Kong, according to AFP. Another magpie robin in Hong Kong tested positive for an H5N1 virus last week.See also:Jan 25 WHO report on fatal human case in Chinahttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_01_25a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Nine-year-old is China’s 10th avian flu victim

first_imgMar 8, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – China reported today that a 9-year-old girl died 2 days ago of H5N1 avian influenza, becoming the country’s 10th person to succumb to the virus.The girl, whose case was announced Feb 27, lived in the eastern province of Zhejiang, the World Health Organization (WHO) said. She fell ill on Feb 10 and was in critical condition by the time her case was made public.China has had 15 confirmed human cases of avian flu. With the girl’s case, the global death toll has increased to 96 out of 175 cases, by the WHO’s count.The girl’s case, along with that of a 32-year-old man who died Mar 2, has prompted questions about how people are getting infected, according to a Reuters report published today.No bird outbreaks of H5N1 have been reported in Zhejiang in recent months, but the girl fell ill after visiting relatives in Anhui province who owned some chickens, some of which were sick, according to earlier reports.The 32-year-old victim was from Guangdong province and lived in an urban area with no reported bird outbreaks, Reuters reported. The story said he was believed to have been exposed to the virus at a poultry market.Zhong Nanshan, director of the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, suggested that both victims might have caught the virus from chickens that were carrying it asymptomatically, according to Reuters.Meanwhile, a top Chinese health official was quoted today as saying that China’s human victims of avian flu had “defective” immune systems. A Bloomberg News story said the comments by Wang Longde, vice minister of health, were reported by the Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post.Wang said the government had studied several cases, but he gave no details, according to the report. The Bloomberg story stated that Wang “said the victims had ‘defective’ immune systems and the general public shouldn’t panic.”However, published scientific reports have not pointed to weak immunity as a common risk factor in human cases. (See link to CIDRAP overview of avian influenza, below.)A WHO official, Aphaluck Bhatiasevi, told the Hong Kong newspaper there is no scientific evidence that infection is linked to immunity. She said cases have been associated with contact with birds, not strength or weakness.Also today, the WHO reported that a 3-day conference in Geneva produced progress on plans for responding quickly to early signs of a flu pandemic. In a news release, the agency said the operational plan “moved closer to final form” as the meeting of 70 public health experts ended today.The results of the meeting will be circulated for review and published as soon as they are ready, the WHO promised.See also:CIDRAP overview of avian influenza and its implications for human diseaselast_img read more

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