Category: vycxdmmp

UNCC instructor who escaped school shooting says students were ‘running for their lives’

first_imgSean Rayford/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — A professor whose class was the site of the deadly school shooting at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte is giving his account of “what actually went down inside the room.”As students in Adam Johnson’s anthropology class were giving their final presentations last month, a former student who had previously been enrolled in the course opened fire.Johnson penned an essay about the experience, which was shared on the department’s website. Johnson wrote that he wanted to document the events and clear up any misinformation.He said the shooting took place in the early evening of April 30, when one group was showing a video about static versus dynamic universe.“We get about seven minutes into the video and without warning, earsplitting bangs ring throughout the room, off the glass walls, creating a terrible reverberation,” Johnson wrote.He then detailed the confusion that erupted and how he kicked his chair and ushered students in the direction of the classroom doors.“I make it to the door, out the door and hold it open for the rushing students. One student falls down in the door way and is stepped on, I pick them up and move them back with the flow of traffic,” he wrote.Johnson described the mayhem outside of the classroom.“The students are scattering and running for their lives, in all directions,” he said.Johnson said he and a few students ran to his office in the anthropology department, where the chair of the department called 911. They waited for “what seemed like forever” until campus police arrived, announcing the all clear, he said.He detailed the hours that immediately followed, when he spoke to police and was met by his partner to pick up his car from campus before going to a nearby friends’ house for dinner.“My emotions are currently high and I am absolutely heartbroken. My students are incredibly special to me and I try to make that known throughout the semester,” he wrote.Johnson did not identify anyone in the essay, including the student who “tackled the shooter and undoubtedly saved more lives.”As for the shooter, “we should not glorify him as it contributes to this kind of violence while continually traumatizing the victims and survivors,” he said.He did explain that the shooter had previously been enrolled in the class and while he was “engaged” early in the semester, the shooter stopped coming to class and Johnson was told that he withdrew.Johnson said that he ran into the shooter shortly after learning that he withdrew from the class, which he estimates was either in late January or early February and “conveyed that it was a shame that they had to leave the course but I understood.”Johnson said students told him that the shooter didn’t say anything until after he emptied his gun magazine.“One victim asked the shooter to stop shooting and [the shooter] said ‘I’m done,’” Johnson wrote.In addition to addressing what he feels are the larger underlying sociological and philosophical issues related to mass shootings, he thanked his friends and community who have supported him in the aftermath.“I am still trying to get an [sic] handle on my personal feelings surrounding this and I find it cathartic to engage with it anthropologically,” he wrote.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Remains of 12-year-old Colorado girl who vanished in 1984 found at ‘clandestine burial site’: Police

first_imgGreeley Police Dept.(GREELEY, Colo.) — The remains of a 12-year-old Colorado girl were discovered this week at “clandestine burial site,” decades after she mysteriously vanished, officials said.Crews were excavating an area in rural Weld County for a pipeline on Tuesday when they found Jonelle Matthews’ remains, Greeley Police said.Jonelle was 12 years old when she was last seen going into her home the night of Dec. 20, 1984, police said.“This case has weighed on the hearts of the Greeley Police Department, the family and the entire city of Greeley,” police said in a statement on Thursday.Jonelle lived in Greeley, which is located in the same county where her remains were found.Foul play is suspected, Greeley Police Sgt. J.P. Tymkowych told ABC News.Additional information, including manner and cause of death, have not been released.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call the Detective Robert Cash at 970-350-9601 or the tip line at 970-351-5100.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Hurricane Dorian’s death toll rises to 21 as it charges up Southeast coast; may make landfall in Carolinas

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Dorian has killed at least 20 in the Bahamas, as well as an elderly man in North Carolina, as the storm looms close to the Southeast coast.Dorian, now a Category 2, is churning parallel to northeast Florida and might make landfall as it inches closer to the Carolinas.‘Time to get out is running out’Dorian is now hovering just off the coast of Florida and southern Georgia, pummeling the Sunshine State to Savannah to South Carolina with rain.A hurricane warning is in effect for the entire South Carolina and North Carolina coastline, which is set to face the brunt of the storm and a dangerous storm surge of up to 8 feet.One storm-related death already struck North Carolina. An 85-year-old man fell off a ladder while preparing his Columbus County home for Dorian, Gov. Roy Cooper said Wednesday.Evacuations were ordered from Florida’s east coast to North Carolina’s Outer Banks.Kevin McAleenan, acting secretary of Homeland Security, told Univision that undocumented immigrants should not “worry about immigration enforcement during the storm — worry about staying safe.”“There will be no routine immigration enforcement during this storm or in the immediate aftermath of this storm,” McAleenan said.Melbourne Beach, Florida, resident Nancy Whiting lives in an evacuation area, but she opted to ride out the storm in her home — the same as she did for Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Irma in 2017 — to address leaks right as they hit.“A lot of the neighbors stayed back. They tend to hunker down, just ride out the storm. They’ve been through a lot of these before,” Whiting told ABC News. “This is what happens in Florida — you stay and protect your property and help out your neighbors.”But officials are urging those in evacuation zones to flee the coast immediately.“If you are still in an evacuation zone you still have time to get out — but time to get out is running out,” South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said Wednesday.“It’s the water that kills people,” McMaster warned, “and it’s clear that we’re going to have a lot of water.”Storm surge will push the water inland into the marshes and the rivers, he said, and at the same time the rain could reach 15 inches, creating “a collision of water” along the coast.Although for some, evacuating isn’t an option. Frances Eason’s husband, David, is spending the hurricane in a Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, hospital.“We went through [Hurricane] Hugo in 1989 and we went through Florence last October and several in between,” Frances Eason told ABC News. “We fared well through it all.”“I think we’re safe here,” she said.For coastal residents who choose not to evacuate, McMaster recommends staying indoors in an interior room and away from windows and glass doors, closing the curtains and blinds, and securing important personal documents.And even if there’s a lull, don’t go outside, McMaster warned — because that could be the eye of the hurricane.Dorian’s pathDorian is forecast to pass Savannah, Georgia, overnight Wednesday into Thursday, bringing powerful wind gusts and dangerous storm surge.The storm will then come close to Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday. Authorities in Charleston are urging the residents who chose not to evacuate to stay off the roads; authorities said during a storm last year, 40 people were rescues from flooded cars.From Charleston, the storm will approach Myrtle Beach then North Carolina’s coast. North Carolina’s Outer Banks will get hit late Thursday into Friday morning.Landfall in possible in coastal South Carolina or North Carolina anytime Thursday night through Friday morning.Regardless of landfall, Dorian will be close enough to the Carolina coasts to bring near-hurricane-force winds, storm surge and flooding. The biggest threat will likely be coastal flooding from Charleston to the Outer Banks. Up to 15 inches of rain is possible.Devastation in the BahamasBefore reaching the U.S., Dorian slammed into the Bahamas on Sunday afternoon as a Category 5 storm, the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record.At least 20 people were killed in the northern Bahamas, where the storm made landfall, according to Bahamas Health Minister Dr. Duane Sands.“We can expect more deaths to be recorded,” Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters Tuesday. “Our priority at this time is search, rescue and recovery.”The storm hovered over the archipelago’s northern islands for nearly two days, leveling dozens of buildings, flooding roads and submerging an airport.Theo Neilly, the Bahamas consul general to the United States, said the greatest need is for water, nonperishable food, generators, tents and tarp poles.“We’re receiving supplies and we’re looking for people who can assist with shipping,” Neilly told ABC News on Tuesday.The British Royal Navy was expected to deliver food to the hard-hit Abaco Islands Tuesday night, according to the Bahamian prime minister. The U.S. Department of State said it’s providing humanitarian assistance, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it’s rescued 61 people.Margaret Hospital in Nassau is now the only hospital capable of treating the most seriously injured in the Bahamas, said Dr. Caroline Burnett-Garraway, medical chief of staff at the hospital.The hospital has received 38 patients, including children, who were evacuated from hard-hit islands, she said. Three of the patients, all men, died after arriving at the hospital, Burnett-Garraway said.Evacuees’ injuries range from head injuries to broken bones to dehydration, she said, as many of them were subjected to floodwaters and intense winds for days. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,ABC News(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Dorian has killed at least 20 in the Bahamas, as well as an elderly man in North Carolina, as the storm looms close to the Southeast coast.Dorian, now a Category 2, is churning parallel to northeast Florida and might make landfall as it inches closer to the Carolinas.‘Time to get out is running out’Dorian is now hovering just off the coast of Florida and southern Georgia, pummeling the Sunshine State to Savannah to South Carolina with rain.A hurricane warning is in effect for the entire South Carolina and North Carolina coastline, which is set to face the brunt of the storm and a dangerous storm surge of up to 8 feet.One storm-related death already struck North Carolina. An 85-year-old man fell off a ladder while preparing his Columbus County home for Dorian, Gov. Roy Cooper said Wednesday.Evacuations were ordered from Florida’s east coast to North Carolina’s Outer Banks.Kevin McAleenan, acting secretary of Homeland Security, told Univision that undocumented immigrants should not “worry about immigration enforcement during the storm — worry about staying safe.”“There will be no routine immigration enforcement during this storm or in the immediate aftermath of this storm,” McAleenan said.Melbourne Beach, Florida, resident Nancy Whiting lives in an evacuation area, but she opted to ride out the storm in her home — the same as she did for Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Irma in 2017 — to address leaks right as they hit.“A lot of the neighbors stayed back. They tend to hunker down, just ride out the storm. They’ve been through a lot of these before,” Whiting told ABC News. “This is what happens in Florida — you stay and protect your property and help out your neighbors.”But officials are urging those in evacuation zones to flee the coast immediately.“If you are still in an evacuation zone you still have time to get out — but time to get out is running out,” South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said Wednesday.“It’s the water that kills people,” McMaster warned, “and it’s clear that we’re going to have a lot of water.”Storm surge will push the water inland into the marshes and the rivers, he said, and at the same time the rain could reach 15 inches, creating “a collision of water” along the coast.Although for some, evacuating isn’t an option. Frances Eason’s husband, David, is spending the hurricane in a Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, hospital.“We went through [Hurricane] Hugo in 1989 and we went through Florence last October and several in between,” Frances Eason told ABC News. “We fared well through it all.”“I think we’re safe here,” she said.For coastal residents who choose not to evacuate, McMaster recommends staying indoors in an interior room and away from windows and glass doors, closing the curtains and blinds, and securing important personal documents.And even if there’s a lull, don’t go outside, McMaster warned — because that could be the eye of the hurricane.Dorian’s pathDorian is forecast to pass Savannah, Georgia, overnight Wednesday into Thursday, bringing powerful wind gusts and dangerous storm surge.The storm will then come close to Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday. Authorities in Charleston are urging the residents who chose not to evacuate to stay off the roads; authorities said during a storm last year, 40 people were rescues from flooded cars.From Charleston, the storm will approach Myrtle Beach then North Carolina’s coast. North Carolina’s Outer Banks will get hit late Thursday into Friday morning.Landfall in possible in coastal South Carolina or North Carolina anytime Thursday night through Friday morning.Regardless of landfall, Dorian will be close enough to the Carolina coasts to bring near-hurricane-force winds, storm surge and flooding. The biggest threat will likely be coastal flooding from Charleston to the Outer Banks. Up to 15 inches of rain is possible.Devastation in the BahamasBefore reaching the U.S., Dorian slammed into the Bahamas on Sunday afternoon as a Category 5 storm, the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record.At least 20 people were killed in the northern Bahamas, where the storm made landfall, according to Bahamas Health Minister Dr. Duane Sands.“We can expect more deaths to be recorded,” Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters Tuesday. “Our priority at this time is search, rescue and recovery.”The storm hovered over the archipelago’s northern islands for nearly two days, leveling dozens of buildings, flooding roads and submerging an airport.Theo Neilly, the Bahamas consul general to the United States, said the greatest need is for water, nonperishable food, generators, tents and tarp poles.“We’re receiving supplies and we’re looking for people who can assist with shipping,” Neilly told ABC News on Tuesday.The British Royal Navy was expected to deliver food to the hard-hit Abaco Islands Tuesday night, according to the Bahamian prime minister. The U.S. Department of State said it’s providing humanitarian assistance, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it’s rescued 61 people.Margaret Hospital in Nassau is now the only hospital capable of treating the most seriously injured in the Bahamas, said Dr. Caroline Burnett-Garraway, medical chief of staff at the hospital.The hospital has received 38 patients, including children, who were evacuated from hard-hit islands, she said. Three of the patients, all men, died after arriving at the hospital, Burnett-Garraway said.Evacuees’ injuries range from head injuries to broken bones to dehydration, she said, as many of them were subjected to floodwaters and intense winds for days. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Three dead in Texas shooting, suspect at large, considered armed and dangerous: Police

first_imgtillsonburg/iStock(AUSTIN, Texas) — Three people were killed in what authorities are calling a domestic incident in Austin, Texas, on Sunday.The incident took place around 11:40 a.m. local time in the 9600 block of Great Hills Trail, police said.When officials arrived on scene, two women and a man were found shot to death outside an apartment building.At a news conference later in the afternoon, Joseph Chacon, the interim police chief of the Austin Police, told reporters that the alleged suspect, Stephen Nicholas Broderick, 41, was still on the loose and was considered “armed and dangerous.”“We don’t know if he is in a vehicle or on foot,” Chacon said. “We are asking for residents to continue to shelter in place.”On Sunday afternoon Chacon said the investigation was still ongoing and officers were searching for clues, but confirmed the shooting was of a domestic nature and the suspect allegedly targeted the three victims.At a later news conference, Chacon confirmed reports that Broderick was a former deputy at the Travis County Sheriff’s Department.There was a child involved with the situation, and officers were able to locate and take the child into custody, Chacon said. It is not known what connection the child has to the alleged suspect or victims.At around 4:45 p.m. local time, officers lifted the shelter in place order for nearby residents but asked them to remain vigilant and alert the authorities if they see the alleged suspect.“We will transition in a search in this area to a fugitive search,” Chacon said.The FBI is assisting with the investigation.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Engineering pay settlements fall to lowest level

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Engineering pay settlements have fallen to their lowest level since 1984. Engineering Employers’ Federation (EEF) figures show that the level of paysettlements reported by engineering and manufacturing companies has fallen to 2per cent. For the three months to the end of May 2002, the average settlement levelwas 2 per cent, compared to 2.2 per cent for the previous three-month period tothe end of April. Pay freezes accounted for just over one in four of allreported settlements and 7 per cent of companies reported they had deferredtheir pay settlement. David Yeandle, EEF deputy director of employment policy, commented:”The fact engineering pay settlements have fallen demonstrates there arecurrently no wage inflationary pressures coming from this sector of theeconomy. It confirms that it is far too early for the Monetary Policy Committeeto be considering increasing interest rates.” www.eef.org.uk   Engineering pay settlements fall to lowest levelOn 28 May 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Government’s flagship 300,000 new homes target stands ‘little chance’ of being achieved, say MPs

first_imgThe government’s flagship new homes building policy to create 300,000 units a year by the mid-2020s is has little chance of being achieved, it has been claimed by MPs.The cross-party House of Commons Public Accounts Committee has released a report that severely criticises ministers’ efforts to increase house building in recent years.“Progress against the government’s annual new house building target is way off track and currently shows scant chance of being achieved,” says Committee chair Meg Hillier (pictured, below).“The government has set itself the highly ambitious target of building 300,000 homes a year by the mid-2020s – levels not seen since World War Two – even though there is no clear rationale for this figure and the ministry themselves say only 265,000 new homes a year are needed.“Government needs to get a grip and set out a clear plan if it is not to jeopardise these ambitions.”Her committee’s report also examines why too few houses are being built, blaming problems at the heart of the planning system. This includes the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government being reluctant to tackle councils who don’t update their local plans, and also difficulties securing sufficient infrastructure contributions from private developers.May’s new homes legacyThe report risks derailing one of Theresa May’s key legacy claims. In a speech made last week during the Chartered Institute of Housing conference, she claimed that in many regions of the UK house building has been ramping up, including by 43% in Nottingham and 80% in Birmingham.“The housing shortage in this country began not because of a blip lasting one year or one parliament, but because not enough homes were built over many decades,” she said.“The very worst thing we could do would be to make the same mistake again.”  meg hillier Public accounts committee Theresa May June 26, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Land & New Homes » Government’s flagship 300,000 new homes target stands ‘little chance’ of being achieved, say MPs previous nextLand & New HomesGovernment’s flagship 300,000 new homes target stands ‘little chance’ of being achieved, say MPsReport by Public Accounts Committee has heavily criticised ministers for failing to get to grips with housing shortage.Nigel Lewis26th June 20190859 Viewslast_img read more

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Jesus student remains in intensive care

first_imgAn Oxford student remains in a critical condition following a 25ft fall from the balcony of his apartment while on holiday in Lloret de Mar, a town on the Costa Brava coastline in Spain. Luke Parry, a second year engineering student at Jesus, sustained serious head injuries after misjudging the jump between the two adjacent balconies of his holiday apartment, at around 4AM on Monday 2nd April. He and his family remain in Spain and he has been forced to rusticate. His identical twin brother, Ellis, a student at St John’s who is also studying Engineering, has also rusticated. Though he has made ‘miraculous progress’, the outlook is still uncertain.His mother posted a message on Sunday saying, ‘They have taken Luke out of a coma and now he is just very heavily sedated. He is still stable and we are hoping that they will start reducing the sedation over the next few days.’Parry was on his third day of holiday on a sports tour with fellow students in Spain when the accident took place. According to friends, he had been trying to get back into his own room after being locked out of his apartment.A spokesman for the Mossos d’Escuadra, the regional Catalan police force, said, ‘We were called at 4am to reports that a British student had fallen from a second storey balcony at the Bolero Park apartments.“Witnesses said he had been trying to jump from one balcony to another, misjudged the jump and fell to the floor.’The spokesman continued, “He was then taken to hospital by ambulance. We believe he had been drinking before the incident.’Fellow students at the scene said that Parry had been back for some time, and was sober when he fell, also adding that stepping between the balconies was something ‘everyone was doing’.Parry’s brother has been keeping friends and family updated on his condition on a public Facebook group called ‘Get better soon Luke’.After being placed in an induced coma, Parry had to undergo emergency brain surgery on Sunday 8th April. He reported that the surgeon said, “We have won the battle but not the war.”The Facebook page has been flooded by messages from well wishers. One friend, Hen Mills, posted, “Got everything crossed for you Luke, keep going. Thinking of you and your family”. Another said that Parry and his family were “in our thoughts everyday”.   Some messages have criticised the press coverage of the accident. One family member pointed out that it was “full of factual errors and grossly inaccurate”.A Daily Mail article attributed the suggestion that Parry was jumping as part of a game to the Catalan police, who are said to have described the accident as a case of ‘balconing’, a craze in which holidaymakers jump from one hotel balcony to another, or into a hotel pool from a balcony.One Jesus student said, “The Daily Mail article is horrible. Luke did not ‘jump’.” He explained that the balconies were a “step” apart and that Luke had just slipped. The student added,“99% of the time it would not have been an issue.”Ashley Gower, the managing director of Sport Travel International, the company which organized the festival Parry and his friends were attending said many were “incensed” at the Daily Mail article. Sports Travel International specialises in organising sports tours for clubs, schools and universities as well as ‘SportsParty’ festivals on the Spanish Costa Brava since the early 1990’s. Gower said, “As a company we were very concerned to hear of the tragic accident.” After learning the news, he flew out to Spain and met with Parry’s family. Gower explained, “We have been told that Luke spent the evening with his colleagues in the apartments and then went out with friends.’“From what we understand,” he continued, “Luke was attempting to climb from the next door balcony back to his own when he fell.”Gower confirmed that there were two witnesses to the incident on the balcony.“Our thoughts and prayers are with Luke and his family at this very distressing time and we are doing everything we practically can to assist them,” Gower said. A spokesperson for the university said: ‘The thoughts of Luke’s many friends and acquaintances at Oxford are with him at this time.’last_img read more

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Turkuaz Sets Its Eyes On The Capitol Theatre Headlining Debut With Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles

first_imgEarlier in August, Turkuaz had huge news for fans, announcing a brand-new album due out on September 28th, Life In The City, and an extensive list of new tour dates in support. Slated to be their fifth album, Life In The City follows up the Brooklyn nine-piece’s 2015 release, Digitonium, and is likely to further solidify Turkuaz as one of the hottest rising artists in the live music scene.As part of their upcoming Life In The City tour, the band has a very special performance scheduled for Friday, October 19th, with the group heading to Port Chester, New York for a headlining performance at the city famed venue, The Capitol Theatre. Marking the group’s final performance of their East Coast leg before heading south, Turkuaz has tapped Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles to join them as support for the show, ensuring a funk-fueled celebration from start to finish.Marking Turkuaz’s headlining debut at The Capitol Theatre, it’s likely that the band will be showing off their new album to fans, highlighting the upcoming album’s highly anticipated nine tracks, in addition to drawing on their expansive catalog of fan-favorites. However, as with every Turkuaz show and given the gravity of this particular performance, the group is likely to pull out all of the stops, going above and beyond at The Capitol Theatre—a difficult feat already given the high energy and attention to detail each Turkuaz show brings to the table.At The Capitol Theatre, Turkuaz will be supported by Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles, another band that has quickly been making waves and earning critical success around the world. Headed by Cory Henry, a former Grammy-winning member of Snarky Puppy, the group showcases Henry’s next-level musical abilities, both as a Hammond B-3 organ player and as a vocalist in his own right. With a stellar band to back him, Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles are not to be missed, so make sure you get to The Capitol Theatre early on October 19th!Tickets for Turkuaz’s headlining debut at The Capitol Theatre are on-sale now and available here. For more information about the band, head to Turkuaz’s website here.last_img read more

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The virtual William James

first_imgArtist, scientist, physician, Harvard professor, psychologist, psychic investigator, philosopher — William James explored multiple vocations in his life-long quest for intellectual clarity and spiritual fulfillment. A new online exhibition launched by Harvard College Library, “ ‘Life is in the transitions’: William James 1842-1910,” offers viewers the chance to trace James’ search through more than 90 manuscripts, letters, photographs, and drawings.The exhibition marks the 100th anniversary of James’ death, and looks back at the transitional moments of his life and illuminates the “plural facts” of James’ experiences, his public and private battles, and elements of what he called the “mosaic philosophy” of radical empiricism, pragmatism, and pluralism that he strived to clarify for his contemporaries.The majority of the exhibition is drawn from the vast James family papers at Houghton Library. Additional items were loaned from Countway Library, Harvard Medical School; Harvard University Archives; and the Ernst Mayr Library, Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. Highlights of the exhibition include James’ sketches of animals and people while a member of Louis Agassiz’s expedition to the Amazon; his lecture notes as a Harvard medical student, with his doodles; his earliest diary; the letter proclaiming his love for his future wife; an exchange of letters with his brother, novelist Henry James, in which they critique each others’ work; drafts for “The Varieties of Religious Experience,” “The Moral Equivalent of War,” “Pragmatism, and Some Problems of Philosophy”; accounts of séances and examples of automatic writing; and a rich selection of photographs of family and friends.The online exhibition is arranged similarly to a physical exhibition — with a series of “cases” that lead viewers through James’ life from a young man until his death. At the same time, viewers are able to jump from case to case and examine items that interest them. Links to the catalog record for every item, as well as links to a finding aid for the James family papers are also included. A physical exhibition of the same name will be on display in the Edison and Newman room of Houghton Library through Dec. 23.last_img read more

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Keeping the faith, outdoors

first_imgThe first major winter storm hit the area in early December, but the bitter temperatures and slippery pavements didn’t deter a group from the Harvard and Cambridge communities from their regular meeting.Despite biting sleet that turned several of inches of snow into icy slush, the Rev. Jedediah Mannis and a handful of attendees and volunteers trekked to the Porter Square MBTA stop on a Sunday morning for their weekly prayer ritual there.Two volunteers wheeled a small metal table into a corner of the subway station and transformed it into an impromptu altar, covering it with a poster painted with a white cross and the words “The Outdoor Church.” On the table, they placed a plate of communion wafers. A small glass pitcher of apple juice filled in for the communion wine.The group formed a semicircle around the makeshift dais as commuters hurried by, oblivious to the solemn ceremony. “We really hate to be inside, but there’s really no helping it today,” said Mannis, a clerical collar peeking out from under his heavy, red winter coat.Since 2003, Mannis and community members from Harvard and Cambridge have met weekly for the Outdoor Church. The open-air services are free and open to anyone. The organizers say that they have missed only three services in the church’s 10 years because of bad weather. They celebrate outside in keeping with their founding philosophy.“We try to stay out as much as we can for a variety of reasons,” said Mannis, noting that many attendees are homeless and uncomfortable in enclosed spaces. “It’s helpful for people to be able to decide if they want to be right in the middle of it or stay 30 feet away and have a cigarette, or stay 60 feet away. People find their own ways of participating in what we are doing, and that’s harder in a place that’s just a room with pews in it.”Mannis, a practicing lawyer and an ordained United Church of Christ minister, started the church with the Rev. Patricia Zifcak, a graduate of Andover Newton Theological School, while he was at Harvard Divinity School (HDS). What began as a weekly Sunday service on the Cambridge Common has morphed into three services — two on Sunday, and a Thursday evening service at the Albany Street homeless shelter in Cambridge. There are also regular pastoral visits to nearby hospitals, prisons, and shelters. On Saturdays, as well as following their Sunday services, Mannis and volunteers canvass Cambridge, handing out sandwiches, juice, socks, and toiletries. In the colder months, they distribute gloves, scarves, and hats.“It just continued to grow,” said Mannis of the church and its outreach work, which helps roughly 120 people each week. “We had decided early on that we didn’t want to go beyond the boundaries of Cambridge, but that we would try to grow by enriching the pastoral services that we were providing for our people. We just try to stay in touch with people wherever we are likely to find them.”In addition to helping the homeless, the church serves as a training ground for students in HDS’s master’s of divinity program, many of whom are preparing for parish- and church-related ministries. As part of the master’s program, students are required to complete 350-400 hours of field experience, and many choose the Outdoor Church for fieldwork.Students assisting the Outdoor Church begin to understand how to connect with people in ways that go beyond what a church can generally offer, and also figure out how to “live with the limits” of what they can do, said Emily Click, assistant dean for ministry studies and field education at HDS.Through their internships, Click said, students learn that “you offer what you can,” and that you don’t always “get to make everything OK. That’s not what it’s about.”Mannis and his volunteers try to help the homeless in any way they can. Through the years, he said, Harvard’s support in that effort has been invaluable.“We typically have two or three interns from Harvard Divinity School and lots of people who make sandwiches for us or go around with us on Sunday afternoons who are members of the Harvard community. We are also supported by Memorial Church … Harvard has played a big role in all the work we do.”It was Tiffany Savage’s first time at the Sunday service, which typically attracts upwards of 20 people, but the Cambridge resident said it wouldn’t be her last. A recovering drug addict, Savage heard about the service through a friend and decided to investigate, despite the bitter weather.Each week the brief service begins with a reading from the Psalms and a series of prayers. In lieu of a sermon, attendees are encouraged to share their reflections on a reading from the Gospel. Savage offered her thoughts about a passage from Matthew.“I believe for me God works through people. When someone says, ‘Why can’t I see him? I don’t believe in him’ … [I say] look in the mirror … it took me a long time to believe that.“It’s only 15 minutes. It’s a great way to start a Sunday morning,” said Savage. “Weather never held me back from other things. I believe weather can’t hold me back from sharing the gifts that God has given me.”Leonard Bentubo, who lives at the Heading Home shelter on School Street, has been a regular at the service for five years. Bentubo said it has become an important part of his life and helped him to deal with the pain of losing custody of his daughter as well as his apartment.“It’s like a lifeline. If it ever left, I don’t know what I would do. … I got blessed by meeting people like Jed, and this gives my life meaning. This is the start of my week. I come here for my charge. It’s like plugging your phone in and getting charged for the week.”last_img read more

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