Category: sggrocur

Syed Mushtaq Ali T20 2021 Point Table, matches, wins, losses,…

first_img54100160.285838/99.0818/100.0 53200120.243601/85.4640/94.3 ATP Tour WTC Final Day 3 LIVE Score: Wagner dismisses Ajinkya Rahane; IND 182/6; follow Live Updates TAGSSyed Mushtaq Ali T20 2021Syed Mushtaq Ali T20 2021 Point TableSyed Mushtaq Ali T20 live scoreSyed Mushtaq Ali T20 LIVE StreamingSyed Mushtaq Ali T20 Point Table SHARE PUNJAB55000202.483784/89.1631/100.0 54001185.763644/67.1306/80.0 F1 French GP 2021 Live: Max Verstappen vs Lewis Hamilton today at 6:30 pm — Follow Live Updates Syed Mushtaq Ali T20 2021 Point Table, matches, wins, losses, LIVE Streaming, LIVE Score PUDUCHERRY 53200121.913920/97.0737/97.2 PSL 2021 Playoffs: Schedule, Timing, LIVE streaming, list of champions; all you need to know PLATE GROUP 54100160.493670/92.0679/100.0 ANDHRA ARUNACHAL PRADESH ASSAM523008-0.961772/100.0816/94.0 Sport News KERALA JHARKHAND TAMIL NADU MEGHALAYA GOA TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST Cricket DELHI TRIPURA 54100160.292736/99.1675/94.4 514004-0.145776/97.2782/96.2 514004-1.39653/85.0691/76.1 505000-1.427703/100.0740/87.3 Halle Open 2021 Final LIVE: Ugo Humbert vs Andrey Rublev, Follow Latest Updates TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST RAILWAYS HYDERABAD (INDIA)514004-0.199758/100.0761/97.5 CricketSportSport NewsSyed Mushtaq Ali T20 53200120.891672/83.4607/85.0 5320012-0.373806/99.4846/100.0 54001183.047634/73.0451/80.0 BENGAL 514004-1.169680/100.0773/97.0 514004-2.939420/83.4650/81.4 ELITE, GROUP D 55000201.161516/85.0491/100.0 GUJARAT Cricket HARYANA 505000-2.393493/100.0570/77.5 Cricket Queens Club Final: Matteo Berrettini vs Cameron Norrie, Head-to-Head, LIVE streaming; all you need to know TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST Previous articleOdisha to complete India’s biggest hockey stadium in Rourkela by 2022Next articleNBA 2020-21: 10 takeaways from a thrilling Martin Luther King Jr. Day spectacle of exciting fixtures Kunal DhyaniSports Tech enthusiast, he reports on Sports Tech industry and writes on sports products. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UTTAR PRADESH ODISHA514004-1.569674/99.0733/87.3 53200120.654743/90.4739/98.0 KARNATAKA 514004-0.593724/97.1732/91.0center_img TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST 505000-1.907663/100.0784/91.5 ELITE, GROUP E 55000201.88775/87.4696/100.0 CHANDIGARH JAMMU & KASHMIR ELITE, GROUP B HIMACHAL PRADESH 523008-1.192691/98.2800/97.2 Formula 1 ELITE, GROUP C MUMBAI MAHARASHTRA 53200120.23822/100.0799/100.0 Facebook Twitter MADHYA PRADESH WTC Final Live: Virat Kohli continues century drought as Kyle Jamieson wins IPL team rivalry 55000200.869782/90.5774/100.0 Viking Classic Birmingham 2021 Final: Daria Kasatkina vs Ons Jabeur, head to head, live stream, all you need to know NAGALAND News Schedule Point Table SAURASHTRA BARODA MANIPUR 523008-1.076515/92.1582/87.2 SIKKIM 53200121.671581/85.2453/88.1 MIZORAM 55000201.465705/91.3624/100.0 514004-0.981702/98.1778/95.4 TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST SERVICES VIDARBHA 54100160.94674/94.3613/99.0 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter BIHAR Cricket By Kunal Dhyani – January 19, 2021 53200120.454864/93.1857/97.1 RAJASTHAN ELITE, GROUP A 514004-0.291635/93.1655/92.1 Sport News Bett1Open 2021 Final: Belinda Bencic vs Liudmila Samsonova, head to head, live stream, all you need to know UTTARAKHAND 514004-1.374719/98.5800/92.3 523008-1.357678/97.1796/95.3 TEAMMWLTN/RPTNRRFORAGAINST ATP Tour CHHATTISGARH Past Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factory|SponsoredSponsoredUndoHollywood TaleHow Victoria Principal Looks At 71 Is HeartbreakingHollywood Tale|SponsoredSponsoredUndoDefinitionTime Was Not Kind To These 28 CelebritiesDefinition|SponsoredSponsoredUndoYourBump15 Actors That Hollywood Banned For LifeYourBump|SponsoredSponsoredUndoFreight & Shipping Quotes | Search AdsResearch & Compare Freight & Shipping QuotesEnjoy Affordable Freight & Shipping Services With These Service ProvidersFreight & Shipping Quotes | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndoMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStory|SponsoredSponsoredUndo 505000-4.521442/85.0742/76.2 Cricket Virat Kohli completes 10 years in Test Cricket: 10 things you should know about India skipper- check out 53200121.56944/99.1788/99.0 WTC Final Live: Kyle Jamieson continues fine Test form, rattles India’s middle-order with venomous swinglast_img read more

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The Clubhouse Podcast: The French foreign legion

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This opens up a conversation on the value of overseas rugby stars, not just in France but throughout the continent of Europe. Is the foreign influx good for European rugby? We put our views forward, discussing, among other things, the impact on shirt sales and attendances, the impact on younger talents, and the insidious nature of ‘academies’ in Fiji.Have a listen and let us know what you think. Is the European Champions Cup all the better for big names jetting in from the southern hemisphere? Will youngsters be hindered by a foreign old head blocking their path? There are plenty of views here… With the Top 14 final ending in the favour of Stade Francais – a 12-6 win over bad luck magnets Clermont Auvergne giving the Paris outfit the title – we thought we would talk through goings-on in France during the latest Clubhouse Podcast.Firstly we talk through that Top 14 final, all tense and close but also try-less and kick-heavy. That’s not to say it wasn’t a good final, and we talk through the good and the bad. Which leads us to comment on Stade’s squad, a squad that bucks the trend at top French sides by having ten starters who are French.last_img read more

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Episcopal-supported intentional community in Charlottesville embodies radical discipleship — and…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags August 18, 2017 at 4:34 pm Radical Marxist indoctrination in action. It is time for this artificial, socialist worldview to be rejected by the church. History shows clearly where this tragic ideological road leads. Wake up! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 21, 2017 at 12:38 pm Amen Dr. Flint! Rector Knoxville, TN Pjcabbiness says: August 18, 2017 at 8:16 pm I’m with PJcabbiness. No doubt many of these people sincerely believe in what they are doing. Truth of the matter, however, is that they are enormously naïve in their understanding of human nature and extremely arrogant in not realizing that. Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 22, 2017 at 2:20 pm Free and open discussion is always good.I do hope you continue to stay in the Episcopal Church and not allow differences to make you feel unappreciated. All religious organizations are struggling to come to terms with the rapid progress that society has made in technology, medicine, understanding of Scriptures based on new historical findings, etc. etc. This has been a cause of discomfort.I have found that you can be a part of the Episcopal Church and yet maintain your “individual identity”. That is the beauty of this church. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Pamela Payne says: August 18, 2017 at 5:39 pm PJ, your crabbyness is very concerning. I worry that you see communists under every bed and around every corner. I pray that you will call upon Jesus and examine your heart, so that His Love and Blessings will fill your life and relieve your fears. Blessings to you. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jawaharlal Prasad says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Pjcabbiness says: William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Episcopal-supported intentional community in Charlottesville embodies radical discipleship — and permaculture Not a commune exactly, but these young people do a lot of sharing and caring Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 18, 2017 at 6:35 pm I am an Episcopal priest in the Charlottesville area, and I know this community and these young people. I am thrilled to see this community thriving and expanding their vision for ministry. August 21, 2017 at 10:58 am I very well may follow you. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Environment & Climate Change August 22, 2017 at 2:04 pm “And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question! This would be true for other nationalities also. History is written by the victors and the history taught in classroom are incomplete or may not be factual.How many of us had heard of Katherine Johnson, African-American physicist and mathematician whose work was critical to the success of the US space program?Many German Christians supported Hitler and what he stood for. If I am not mistaken, the Catholic priest who gave money to Hitler to start his political group eventually became the Pope.Media needs to do its part. Curate Diocese of Nebraska William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: William A Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Donald Heacock says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 18, 2017 at 8:28 pm I applaud their Community . Their idealism & service. I am puzzled by their dislike of Capitalism? They seem to be getting educations & jobs they seem to seek. Sadly some always fall through the safety net. I suspect the laND & buildings were probably are a gift of of a well to do family. Many Episcopal Churchs also have been built from well to do business people. Maybe they should reread Orwell’s 1984. Rector Albany, NY August 20, 2017 at 10:34 am Yes, Orwell’s 1984 is here and so is Bradbury’s 451 Fahrenheit. My family and I are done with the Episcopal Church. We have been patient, but it’s time to move on. Submit an Event Listing August 20, 2017 at 7:00 pm How did Hitler change Germany from a democracy to a Nazi dictatorship and then reinforce this? For those who do not know history it would be impossible for them to answer this question. Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question.One only need look at the move afoot in The United States of America to remove Confederate statues from public venues to see the seed planted. The divisive media and progressive agenda to assign blame for all the ills of this country to a particular group of people comes right out of the Nazi Playbook. Hitler was a Socialist Liberal: “We are socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are determined to destroy this system under all conditions.” Adolf Hitler, May 1, 1927. A favorite tactic employed by the progressive agenda and media is to describe the Nazis as “right wing” with Adolf Hitler as their leader. Rewriting history is pretty common for progressives. One example is the American KKK was actually founded by Democrats. This is why patriotic Americans of all races, creeds, origins, sexual status and any other label progressives have designed to divide us, need to stand up and oppose this effort to CHANGE OUR COMMON HISTORY.The Nazis started by confusing the issues, usurping truth for lies, misinformation in the news media, assigning blame for all the ills of society to one specific group (which later would be expanded to multiple groups), and ultimately a change in the German Constitution. If this sounds familiar it is because Americans are experiencing this in their own country now.This is why it is important to learn and know history, not change it or try to erase it, but learn it. When those of us in religious life took an oath to NEVER AGAIN let this happen, we were serious. One may think it is vogue to be identified as a Progressive in America today. Remember, it was just a vogue to be identified as a Nazi Party member in Germany of yesterday.Know History! Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Neff Powell says: Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Jon Spangler says: Dan Tootle says: Submit a Press Release August 18, 2017 at 4:48 pm Yes, we know where this leads. . . to the Kingdom of God! Humankind did not get this right the first time, so we now have another opportunity to live into what Jesus and his Followers exampled for us. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 18, 2017 at 4:43 pm Perhaps Pjcabbines should re-read Acts 2:42-47, which preceded Marx and Engels by at least 1600 years and is referred to directly in the article? Here it is:“And they continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers. 43 Then fear came upon every soul, and many wonders and signs were done through the apostles. 44 Now all who believed were together, and had all things in common, 45 and sold their possessions and goods, and divided them among all, as anyone had need.46 So continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, they ate their food with gladness and simplicity of heart, 47 praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to the church[h] daily those who were being saved.” This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, August 21, 2017 at 10:59 am How did Hitler change Germany from a democracy to a Nazi dictatorship and then reinforce this? For those who do not know history it would be impossible for them to answer this question. Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question.One only need look at the move afoot in The United States of America to remove Confederate statues from public venues to see the seed planted. The divisive media and progressive agenda to assign blame for all the ills of this country to a particular group of people comes right out of the Nazi Playbook. Hitler was a Socialist Liberal: “We are socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are determined to destroy this system under all conditions.” Adolf Hitler, May 1, 1927. A favorite tactic employed by the progressive agenda and media is to describe the Nazis as “right wing” with Adolf Hitler as their leader. Rewriting history is pretty common for progressives. One example is the American KKK was actually founded by Democrats. This is why patriotic Americans of all races, creeds, origins, sexual status and any other label progressives have designed to divide us, need to stand up and oppose this effort to CHANGE OUR COMMON HISTORY.The Nazis started by confusing the issues, usurping truth for lies, misinformation in the news media, assigning blame for all the ills of society to one specific group (which later would be expanded to multiple groups), and ultimately a change in the German Constitution. If this sounds familiar it is because Americans are experiencing this in their own country now.This is why it is important to learn and know history, not change it or try to erase it, but learn it. When those of us in religious life took an oath to NEVER AGAIN let this happen, we were serious. One may think it is vogue to be identified as a Progressive in America today. Remember, it was just a vogue to be identified as a Nazi Party member in Germany of yesterday.Know History! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Grace Cangialosi says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Jawaharlal Prasad says: August 21, 2017 at 7:33 pm I am impressed and inspired by this wonderful story. By Amy SowderPosted Aug 18, 2017 Submit a Job Listing Comments (15) Press Release Service Charlottesville, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Sarah Rachel says: Claire Hitchins tends the food garden that supplements the diet of those living at the Charis Intentional Community, a mission of Grace Church, Red Hill, southwest of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] In the 95-degree heat, a young, bearded white man wearing a hat with a “Black Lives Matter” pin sprawls on a lawn chair past the graveled driveway of the house nestled in a valley off Monacan Trail Road southwest of Charlottesville, Virginia. A rainbow of origami cranes strung together like garland hovers between two posts behind him. When a visitor approaches, he stretches as he gets up and leads her through the front door, where young people huddle in a colorful living room packed with books and art.Within the hour, the house and lawn will fill with more than 30 people, bringing chatter, singing, children’s laughter, a strumming banjo and serious conversations — along with the salads, enchiladas, quiches and cookies of a casual summer potluck party.This is home base for the Charis Community. Pronounced kaar-is, Charis means “grace” in ancient Greek.Cofounded in 2015 by Episcopal youth leader Grace Aheron and the Rev. Neal Halvorson-Taylor of Grace Church, Red Hill, the Charis Community is a gathering of people living together under the shared values of simplicity, prayer and hospitality. This intentional Christian community is housed at an unused Episcopal Church property. The eight acres owned by the Diocese of Virginia include a small cobblestone church, a ranch-style house, a food garden and a forest of tulip poplars and dogwoods. The Charis Community is a partnership with Grace Church, a nearby mission parish. This Charis mission is supported by the church’s vestry, and members keep in contact with Halvorson-Taylor weekly on an informal basis.The Charis Community idea formed through a connection followed by discussions and prayer. Halvorson-Taylor is married to Aheron’s Hebrew professor at the University of Virginia, and they got in touch a year after Aheron graduated and was living in San Francisco. Halvorson-Taylor knew of this property no one was using.“I felt like God was calling me to go and do this in Charlottesville. It took me a long time to figure that out. We were in conversations for months,” Aheron said.Trusting in the transformation of the spirit, the young adults living at Charis are discerning their vocational call, sitting in the tensions of injustice and inviting others into the journey.Charis cofounder Grace Aheron and partner Rowan Hollins chat at the potluck party in front of the garland of origami cranes created in support for people of color, hanging outside the intentional community’s home south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News Service“We understand that all of what we do is interconnected, from the radical activism to the ecological,” said Claire Hitchins, 26, a musician and one of the five long-term residents.These young adults share an explicit passion “to respond to our context of empire, capitalism, and alienation, along with the environmental and social destruction that those forces perpetuate,” according to the community’s official mission statement. They want to model Jesus’ vision of community, resist society’s violence and accompany each other on their individual journeys of discipleship and growth.An intentional community can take many forms, but it always involves a group of people living together with a clear mission. While a commune usually means all individual resources are pooled and shared, other intentional communities share only some of their resources.Charis housemates share chores posted on the refrigerator, including gardening, tending chickens and bees and general household upkeep. They contribute monthly to a fund for the house’s food and supplies, and they maintain an account at a credit union for house bills. Once or twice a week, they join for a morning prayer, also considered an open-faith meditation. There’s no discrimination based on religion, color, culture, race, ancestry, sexual orientation, disability, gender or gender expression. And they dine together at a weekly community meal, where they have a meeting to address projects — some ecological, others outreach-based.A monastery is yet another type of intentional community. Monasteries are cloistered from the outside world to varying degrees and require members to take religious vows. But many kinds of intentional communities don’t fall along these lines. The Episcopal Service Corps helps develop and support a network of 26 intentional communities from Hawaii to New Hampshire, united by shared values of service, justice and prayer. Charis isn’t listed under this network but resembles this style.Located on land where the Monacan Indian Nation lived centuries earlier, according to the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, the Charis Community comprises people in their 20s and early 30s who are devoted to radical discipleship. They share a belief in the importance of hospitality, outreach and permaculture.Hospitality within and beyondThe friendly, generous reception of visitors to the Charis home is a Christian act, and it’s something members take seriously. This place is a refuge for people in need of moral support, safety from tenuous living situations and hope for a better future.Friends, parishioners and fellow activists gather at the Charis Community home south of Charlottesville, Virginia, for a monthly potluck party. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServicePeople flock to their monthly potlucks, where it’s tradition to start the meal with a song. David Slezak, 70, arrived at the July potluck bearing his organic beef cabbage rolls, a family recipe. Slezak is a parishioner and singer at St. Paul’s Memorial Church at the University of Virginia and manager of Haven Kitchen, a homeless shelter kitchen. He also attended the Charis sunrise Easter service and brunch, along with about 75 other people.He’s inspired by Aheron’s leadership and energy. “She’s an Episcopal powerhouse,” he said. “I’ve been just so moved by Grace and her work.”Short-term residential guests at Charis may be experiencing housing insecurity because they can’t afford market-rate rentals, they recently arrived in the Charlottesville community, were released from the hospital or from prison, and or their family is in transition from divorce, domestic violence or ending foster care.Charis housemates Rowan Hollins and Mark Heisey relax at the monthly potluck party outside the house where the Christian intentional community resides south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServiceThey could be anyone from single parents with low-wage jobs who experience a crisis to former refugees whose formal support has ended, said Mark Heisey, 29, the bearded guy from the front lawn, as he, Aheron and Hitchins gave a tour of the house.Hospitality plays a role in a larger sense too — especially considering the violence and upheaval in the larger Charlottesville community after the summer’s white supremacy rallies protesting the removal of Confederate statues.“We want to help Charlottesville become more hospitable to people for whom conditions have become inhospitable,” said Ann Marie Smith, a Buddhist-Christian and member of Grace Church who attended the potluck. She leads weekly meditation sessions in the Charis living room.Outreach in times of peace and troubleThe property can feel like a secluded haven where tomato leaves rustle and crickets sing. But the swoosh of Route 29 traffic and the clunky hum of the parallel-running Amtrak train just beyond are tangible reminders that the outside is always near.Most of the Charis residents have outside jobs to go to during the day. Maria Niechwiadowicz, 25, is a Charis resident who works as a program coordinator for Bread & Roses, a nutritional outreach ministry of Trinity Episcopal Church in Charlottesville. “I think we all went into this thinking permaculture would be our thing, but with the changing political landscape, we found racial justice and hospitality, which means inviting people here so conversations can happen in a deeper sense, and for people to feel safe,” Niechwiadowicz said.A University of Virginia graduate in religious studies, youth minister and program manager at Restoration Village Arts in Charlottesville, Aheron, 26, has worked for social, environmental, racial and women’s causes on her own and through the Episcopal Church. For instance, she was on the Episcopal Church’s delegation to the 2015 meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. She participated in an eco-justice panel discussion at a Diocese of California event in San Francisco in her role as a member of Cultivate: The Episcopal Food Movement. She was also an adult member of the 2017 Episcopal Youth Event Mission Planning Team.Aheron and the other Charis members joined counter-protesters at the July 8 Ku Klux Klan rally and at the Aug. 11 and 12 white supremacy rallies in downtown Charlottesville.Tension was already thick after the July rally, before the more extreme violence of the second rally. Hours before the potluck, Charis members were still reeling from the first protest, the police reaction to it and all the implications.A rainbow garland, created in support for people of color during the summer’s white supremacy rallies, is made of origami cranes, each of which contains a message, such as this one: “Don’t hurt my friends.” For a potluck party, the garland hung outside the Charis house, an intentional community south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News Service“Police tear-gassed people, and we were downwind of it, wiping our eyes. It’s a very emotional time right now,” Aheron said as she and other Charis housemates gathered in the living room anchored by a velvety silver couch and matching chair. A megaphone sat atop a piano. Three counter-protest signs leaned against the fireplace. Each of the small paper cranes on the garland outside had written intentions to eradicate white supremacy in Charlottesville. One message peeked out from pink paper crane: “Don’t hurt my friends!”Then, at the Aug. 12 rally, one young woman was killed and 19 people injured when a man associated with white supremacy groups plowed his car into counter-protestors. No one from Charis was injured, but Aheron and Charis guest Rowan Hollins were standing on the corner of the street where the attack happened.White supremacists have since protested by the vigils and memorial services, and Heisey has helped with security, Aheron said.“Everyone’s physically fine, but not emotionally. We’re pretty traumatized,” said Aheron, who had a dream that a white supremacist drove into her mother’s house. “No one in Charlottesville has been able to get rest. It’s not over, by any means.”Smith, 48, doesn’t live at Charis, but she’s there often as part of the larger community participating in outreach. “These guys are putting themselves on the front line of this, all in Christian discipleship, so I accompany them and help provide a meditative grounded space,” Smith said.A permaculture of many layersCharis had quieter beginnings and practices, namely, permaculture as a guiding principle. For many, permaculture means closed systems of production, efficiency and high-intensity homesteading. Charis wants to apply these principles plus more.Permaculture in general focuses on letting the land speak for itself. Rather than simply extracting products from a space of land, Charis members pay attention to the soil composition, needs of the plants and natural curvature of the land, which is assessed for best use. In their permaculture, the land has so much more to say, and that land carries memory. They call it “listening permaculture.”“You usually hear this whitewashed, like a homestead Disneyland,” Aheron said. “But a lot of what we learned in growing processes came from indigenous people.”Martha Morris, 30, has lived in the Charis community off-and-on since it began. After earning her graduate degree in urban and environmental planning, she became a stewardship assistant at the Virginia Outdoors Association. “I do like the land-based part of it, and that’s part of what drew me here,” Morris said about the community. “It fits into the larger philosophy of Charis, including outreach activities.”Charis cofounder Grace Aheron tends bees for honey farming, a sustainable practice that’s part of the permaculture values of this intentional community on Episcopal land. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServiceFor this community, that respect for the land means a plan to replace the lawn with a forest garden that will help them be as food self-sufficient as possible. Also called a food forest, a forest garden is a key part of permaculture. It’s a sustainable garden designed to produce the beneficial relationships that a natural plant-and-animal community has in that climate.Morris is excited about what they can do: nurture indigenous, perennial plants including medicinal plants, herbs and fruit trees. They already have a garden yielding all sorts of produce: strawberries, Anaheim peppers, basil, large red tomatoes, little yellow pear tomatoes, Roma tomatoes, summer squash, parsley, prickly cucumbers, and summer squash. They have two beehives, and they’d also like to create a flower garden to serve the church’s cemetery.In the basement, about a dozen 10-day-old fluffy heritage chicks hopped and pecked about in their wooden pen, warmed by a red light. These chicks aren’t fancy heritage breeds. “It’s about preserving the tradition of well-bred, healthy, old lines of animals, chickens not bred to get huge, lay tons of eggs and die young,” she said.Behind the house, Heisey pointed to the ChickShaw, or mobile chicken coop, he built from wood and wire after the last flock was plucked off by predators. “Having chickens in one spot for only a limited time has an ecological benefit,” Heisey said. “By moving them regularly, they’ll have grubs to eat and fortify the soil.”Other valuesIntegrated with permaculture are the values of simplicity, resilience, sustainable cultivation, responsible revenue generation, closed-loop systems and homesteading.Composting is an easy example of a closed-looped system, using food waste to fertilize their food garden — instead of disposing of it. Worms found in compost are integral to the process.“Worm poop is super good for nutrients, which is good for the soil,” Hitchins said as she riffled through the compost with gloved hands to expose the wrigglers. It’s a natural, and some say superior, alternative to store-bought fertilizer for gardening.To some, living in this kind of community can seem idealistic. But it’s living with a deep awareness of the history of the earth and its people, in the spirit of Jesus’ teachings, Aheron said. That awareness transforms into action. And that action can have benefits expanding beyond these eight acres.As the potluck party-goers tossed a Frisbee on the front lawn where lightning bugs pulsed in the darkening sky, Hitchins sat at the piano inside the house with a friend, creating a song:“We are more than conquerors/If we only believe another world is possible/Victory is in our eyes/I’m gonna stay on the battlefield until the day I die.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a Brooklyn, New York-based freelance writer. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

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Episcopal ministries respond to domestic abuse, mental health and gun…

first_imgEpiscopal ministries respond to domestic abuse, mental health and gun violence concerns associated with COVID-19 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Paula SchaapPosted May 12, 2020 Rector Knoxville, TN Gun Violence, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishops United Against Gun Violence, Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Women’s Ministry Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Health & Healthcare, Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC COVID-19, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Police caution tape surrounds a playground in Lake Oswego, Oregon, on March 24, 2020, the day after Gov. Kate Brown issued a statewide stay-at-home order that closed all playgrounds and sports facilities. Government and public health officials fear a potential spike in domestic violence, as victims shelter at home with their abusers. Photo: Gillian Flaccus/AP[Episcopal News Service] As states and cities continue to ask citizens to shelter in place to slow the spread of the new coronavirus, Episcopal-affiliated ministries that serve victims of domestic violence are finding new approaches to caring for the vulnerable in their communities.As COVID-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. continue to rise, with over 1.3 million cases and 80,000 deaths as of May 12, incidents of reported domestic abuse have increased. Ministering to those most at risk can be hard, as victims and survivors could be sheltering in place with their abusers.The Rev. Becca Stevens, founder and president of Thistle Farms – a nonprofit based in Nashville, Tennessee, that aids female survivors of prostitution, trafficking and addiction – told Episcopal News Service that COVID-19 has made it harder to respond to the special needs of the community.“So we’re asking, ‘How can we respond in a way that’s life-giving and respectful?’” she said.Thistle Farms runs a two-year residential program for women that focuses on recovering from addiction and becoming self-sufficient. Part of the program provides education and group therapy to women in prison who are expected to go into the residential program once they are released. Even after women graduate from Thistle Farms, they’re still considered part of the community.For women who are a part of the community but no longer in residence at Thistle Farms, the COVID-19 quarantine can pose added stress. Even before the pandemic, there was always a chance that residents would go back into abusive relationships once they left the support of the shelter residence, Stevens said.“Women will graduate and go back into dangerous relationships even after doing heroic work and recovering and getting off the streets,” she said. “This has been a concern of ours for a long time.”Plus, people in recovery have a fear of relapse even under the best of circumstances, let alone during a terribly disruptive public health crisis, she added.Since the pandemic began, Thistle Farms staff and volunteers have included a card in their “porch-to-porch” delivery service that brings food and other necessities to people in the Thistle Farms community who are no longer in residence. The card says: “This is for you. Love, your community. Please let us know if you need anything.”In Texas, an Episcopal church-based behavioral health ministry serving low-income Hispanic communities has moved its counseling services online because of COVID-19 but acknowledges that asking women to shelter at home with abusers potentially increases the danger.“We are telling people, ‘Stay home to stay safe,’ but not all homes are safe,” said Marisol Salgado, a bilingual counselor who runs the behavioral health ministry at St. Paul’s/San Pablo Episcopal Church in Houston.“I have clients who I cannot call because it’s a safety issue,” she said. “It’s not safe to talk to me in their homes.”The Rev. Ed Gómez, vicar at St. Paul’s, set up the program with help from Episcopal Relief and Development in response to the visible increase in anxiety, depression, isolation, sexual violence and assault associated with Hurricane Harvey and its devastating aftereffects on Spanish-speaking communities served by Episcopal churches across Houston.Harvey-related unemployment and financial problems increased the risk of family violence, according to a study by the Texas Council on Family Violence.Plus, a perceived stigma associated with seeking mental health counseling in Latino communities creates an additional barrier to providing services, said Gómez.“People will go for everything to their clergy, but I’m not a therapist,” he said. “How you relate to Jesus is one thing. How [a situation] affects your drinking, your domestic relations, is another thing.”Job losses in low-income communities where undocumented workers cannot access unemployment benefits put additional stress on families, which worries Gómez.“After San Pablo had 700 people come for a food distribution event, someone left a voicemail message with the church to say thank you, and they started to cry,” Gómez said.“This person was really in need, really in pain, really in fear,” he said. “That kind of thank you – it’s depressing.”Texas began a phased-in, limited opening of certain businesses on May 1. Though Gómez said it would be a relief for some people to get back to work, his church community members often are viewed as cheap labor.“It is highly doubtful that [employers] will provide a safe work environment by providing masks and gloves,” he said in an email.Salgado’s concern about how to contact people still in abusive home situations was echoed by the Rev. Paul Feuerstein, a social worker and priest. Feuerstein is the founder and CEO of Barrier Free Living, which operates an emergency domestic violence shelter for people with disabilities in New York City.Feuerstein estimated that about 50% of the people who are in touch with Barrier Free Living counselors – now only via phone or video – are living with their abusers.“That’s a real challenge because being in touch with folks can be dangerous,” he said. “So we have to let the women take the lead – because oftentimes they are waiting for the abuser to leave the house.”Calls and text messages to Barrier Free Living’s office phone and hotline dropped significantly during the first couple of weeks after New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a stay-at-home order on March 22, Feuerstein said.“I think it was the phenomenon of being at home with abusers and not knowing how to reach out for help,” he said. But the calls have picked up since then.New York City has been hit especially hard by COVID-19, with more than 190,000 cases and over 19,500 deaths.Barrier Free Living’s shelter was slightly under capacity before COVID-19 arrived. Now it is at capacity. The shelter does have separate apartments for residents – a boon in a time when group living situations can hasten viral spread.Nevertheless, group activities have come to a halt, which can be especially hard on children who live with a parent in the shelter. Housing parents and children escaping abusive homes requires extra precautions, even for something as straightforward as getting children online for school.Feuerstein himself had to take iPads to the children at the shelter instead of having them delivered because the shelter location is confidential.Episcopal Church members also have stepped up advocacy against gun violence as weapon sales rise during the pandemic. A gun in the home is an added risk for domestic violence and suicide.“Sadly, for some people, staying home does not mean staying safe, particularly where there is a history or risk of domestic violence,” Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, co-convener of Bishops United Against Gun Violence, told ENS, “or where there is a history or risk of matters of depression or other forms of mental illness.”At a time when all eyes are trained on COVID-19 and its effects on communities and businesses, Douglas says he doesn’t want the issue of guns to be “lost in the mix,” as he believes the pressures of isolation and lost employment could exacerbate gun violence.He pointed out that many bishops have access to their elected officials, so Bishops United Against Gun Violence is encouraging them to contact their representatives and advocate for sensible gun legislation.“Then we ask bishops to speak with their clergy to keep a watchful eye out in situations where there might be an increased risk for suicide or domestic violence,” Douglas said, “or if they know parishioners who suffer from depression, or domestic violence – and not be afraid to ask the question: Is there a gun in the home?”– Paula Schaap is an Episcopalian and a writer and editor who covers religion, science and finance. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

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GG House / Architekt.Lemanski

first_imgArchDaily Architects: Architekt.Lemanski Area Area of this architecture project Save this picture!© Tomasz Zakrzewski+ 23 Share CopyAbout this officeArchitekt.LemanskiOfficeFollowProductsSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesKrakowHousesPolandPublished on August 22, 2014Cite: “GG House / Architekt.Lemanski” 22 Aug 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeArmchairsAndreu WorldGrand Raglan – Lounge ChairSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesPlantingSikaGreen RoofsStonesCosentinoSilestone Surfaces – Ethereal CollectionMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 8″Panels / Prefabricated AssembliesFranken-SchotterFacade Panels – Dietfurt LimestoneWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusWoodGustafsWood Cladding in St. Erik Eye HospitalLightsKKDCLighting – Groove FLEXMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Houses 2014 “COPY” Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/537528/gg-house-architekt-lemanski Clipboard Poland ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/537528/gg-house-architekt-lemanski Clipboard GG House / Architekt.Lemanski Photographs Area:  369 m² Area:  369 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2014 GG House / Architekt.LemanskiSave this projectSaveGG House / Architekt.Lemanski photographs:  Tomasz ZakrzewskiPhotographs:  Tomasz Zakrzewski Save this picture!© Tomasz ZakrzewskiRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles- CoverlamWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena Apeldoorn”GG House” was located on a south, steep slope in the green district of Cracow – Przegorzały. The simple form of the building is divided among window placements on the façade to let maximum amount of sunlight inside. The south façade of the building, is covered with balconies and porches which provides nice shade in summer and allows the sun to fill the interior in winter.Save this picture!Section AAElevation difference between road and ledge on which house is standing is 12 meters. In this space architect placed parking area and garage, so the cars can be easily hidden on the road level, while the rest of the house can take advantage of natural dolomite ledge strengthen with four ten meters-high columns.Save this picture!© Tomasz ZakrzewskiOn the ground floor, on the east side, there is a kitchen connected with terrace. Living room and dining room have been situated on the south side, along with sunny terrace which gives panoramic view of the Vistula River. The same floor also contains a small apartment for guests.Save this picture!First Floor PlanOn the first floor there are three bedrooms, wardrobe and bathrooms. The highest floor has been designed as „chill-out room”Save this picture!© Tomasz ZakrzewskiArchitect Tadeusz Lemanski had to take into consideration not only the formation and geological structure of the plot, but also the constraints imposed on the project by local regulations and above all, the Directorate of Jurassic Landscape Parks. Due to strict zoning requirements the house had to be built only from natural materials and and covered with pitched roof with a steep slope.Save this picture!© Tomasz ZakrzewskiProject gallerySee allShow lessOrandajima House Community Centre / Martin van der Linden + Ayumu Ota + Yuko KawakitaSelected ProjectsBOX 298 Building / Andrade Morettin Arquitetos AssociadosSelected Projects Share CopyHouses•Krakow, Poland Year:  “COPY”last_img read more

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Microdonations – more than just pocket money?

first_imgMicrodonations – more than just pocket money? Howard Lake | 17 September 2010 | News Tagged with: Digital Individual giving microdonations “Microdonations? Is that what this is?” says Anthony Law, founder of Pennies From Heaven. “It’s definitely giving pennies not pounds, but pennies become pounds.”Pennies From Heaven is probably one of the longest standing methods of ‘microdonating’. It is a system whereby people choose to give pennies from their pay at the end of each month, so if, say, your salary comes to £999.50, you round it up to £1,000 and the extra 50p goes to charity.Since its inception in 1998, PFH has raised over £1.5m for over 140 charities and currently distributes around £30k a month before Gift Aid.The term ‘microdonation’ is a more recent addition to the fundraising lexicon. With the rapid development of new technology and social media, plus donors’ increasing familiarity with it, has come a number of ways of giving small amounts of money, although all seem to have come about through individual innovations rather than microdonating being seen as a method in itself.Probably the best – or the biggest – examples of microdonations in action are at eBay. Its ‘Give at Checkout’ scheme gives buyers the option to add a small charitable donation when making purchases. Since it was launched in November 2008, it has raised £2.54m for 533 charities, with 57 receiving over £10,000 each. Currently between £110k and £120 a month goes to charity with £130k to £140k being donated from eBay’s sellers, who can elect to give a percentage of their selling price to charity.Penny On, a scheme to give a penny on top of your shopping bill, has been successfully piloted in the north west. MD of Penny On Stephen Bailey says that during a three month pilot, between three and eight per cent of till transactions attracted the Penny On. Shoppers can choose to add as much as they want to their bills – a penny, rounding the bill up to the nearest pound, adding a couple of quid. Each penny has a bar code like any other item and is very simple for retailers to use. Penny On chooses the charities to benefit, but picks local and international organisations that support the .Marc Simpson, founder of ploink!, wanted to create a way of giving online that emulated putting coins in a collecting tin or in a piggy bank. “They are like micro-pledges,” he explains. “You put a penny into the virtual pig online. When it gets up to 99p you can either donate that 99p via your credit card, or you can wait until it gets up to the maximum of £10.” It’s early days for ploink! but it has already donated around £1,500 and has just under 600 people signed up with about 200 charities on the site.It hasn’t undertaken any advertising or marketing so far other than using Twitter and Facebook because Simpson wants to get the model absolutely right before he is inundated with donations.ploink! has its Gift Aid audit trail approved and Penny On is ‘having an ongoing dialogue’ with HMRC so that it will also be able to apply Gift Aid to donations. Pennies For Heaven collects Gift Aid on all its donations.Other initiatives such as Cofacio also donate money to charities. Cofacio works as a ‘help engine’ and works by members getting awarded ‘points’ every time they answer or ask a question of the community. Members themselves decide where to cash in their points, supporting one of the charities (there are currently four). Corporate partners provide the financial backing to convert points into money.This follows on from search engines such as Everyclick (which has so far donated almost £1.4m to charities), Clicknow and search2give that donate a set amount to charities every time someone uses them to search for something on the internet.There will be more in the pipeline. Giving has remained static for most of the last 10 years, and with the economic outlook still a bit rocky, perhaps ways of collecting small amounts of money that aren’t so noticeable on individual balance sheets, but add up to significant sums on organisation’s accounts, are worth looking at.  30 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Veteran Realtor to Open RE/MAX Office in Rosemead, San Gabriel Valley

first_img Subscribe HerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Darrel Done BusinessVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Business News Top of the News More Cool Stuff Rudy L. Kusuma, a local real estate veteran, is now the new Broker/Owner of RE/MAX TITANIUM, which is expected to open Monday, December 15, 2014 in Rosemead, San Gabriel Valley.RE/MAX TITANIUM will be located at 8932 Mission Drive, Suite 102 in Rosemead, and currently features 10 residential real estate professionals with more than 52 years of combined experience.“Today first-time homebuyers have more opportunities than ever before in our industry, especially here in San Gabriel Valley,” Kusuma says. “It’s a great time to be in the business and an excellent way to serve members of our community.”RE/MAX TITANIUM will serve families within San Gabriel Valley and all Los Angeles County and specializes in first time home buyers, investment properties, and luxury homes.For more information about RE/MAX TITANIUM, please visit www.TeamNuVision.net or call (626) 780-2221. Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 17 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Veteran Realtor to Open RE/MAX Office in Rosemead, San Gabriel Valley Experience, Full-Service Amenities To Be Showcase of RE/MAX TITANIUM From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 | 11:05 am Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Reps. Chu and Katko Introduce HEART Act to Help Animals Rescued by Federal Government

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Subscribe Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Government Reps. Chu and Katko Introduce HEART Act to Help Animals Rescued by Federal Government Published on Thursday, February 25, 2016 | 12:45 pm Herbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Community News Today, Reps. Judy Chu (CA-27) and John Katko (NY-24) introduced the Helping Extract Animals from Red Tape (HEART) Act, which would expedite the rehabilitation process of abused animals that are seized under federal law by the government. The HEART Act would also place the burden of paying for the cost of caring for these animals to the person claiming an interest in the animal, rather than local animal shelters. Reps. Chu and Katko released the following statements:Animal cruelty is a heinous crime against defenseless creatures,” said Rep. Chu. “Our government is rightfully vigilant and active in shutting down crime rings, but when the animals are seized, the cost and care falls on local shelters. Given that court proceedings can take over a year, those shelters, taxpayers, and other nonprofit entities pay millions of dollars to care for these animals. The bipartisan bill that I introduce with Rep. Katko would rightfully place the burden of cost on the individuals who cause the actual harm. Most importantly, the bill would allow shelters to begin rehabilitation services before the court case concludes, which would reduce the time animals are held in shelters by more than half. I look forward to working with my colleagues to keep animals safe and place responsibility where it belongs.”“As a former federal prosecutor, I’ve long-recognized that our system unfairly places the cost of care for abused animals on the American taxpayer, local municipal shelters, and nonprofit organizations,” said Rep. Katko. “I am greatly appreciative for the many animal advocates, like the ASPCA, who are committed to ending animal fighting and providing quality care and shelter for abused animals. I’m proud to have worked in a bipartisan manner with Representative Chu to streamline the process so that our local shelters can more quickly provide rehabilitation services and find loving homes for victimized animals.”The HEART Act would accomplish the following:• Accelerate the disposition process by reducing the period the Government has to notify interested parties following the seizure of animals under the federal animal fighting or gambling statutes from 60 days to 30 days, thus prioritizing the animals’ care;• Provide judges the discretion to require a claimant to post a bond to cover the cost of care for animals seized under the federal animal fighting and gambling statute during the period of seizure;• Require the immediate forfeiture of the animals to the seizing agency if a court ordered bond is not posted; and• Require the full bond be returned to the claimant should they prevail in the forfeiture proceedings.The bill language can be found here. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

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Nintendo Download: Strike While the Persona is Hot

first_img Twitter Nintendo Download: Strike While the Persona is Hot Facebook TAGS  WhatsApp Pinterest Pinterest Twittercenter_img Join the Phantom Thieves and strike back against the corruption overtaking cities across Japan in Persona 5 Strikers. Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 18, 2021 WhatsApp Local NewsBusiness Previous articleMay Mobility Selects Ouster’s Lidar Sensors for Autonomous Shuttle PlatformNext articleUnited Network for Organ Sharing Selects Nutanix to Power Transplant Matching Network Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Dorian strengthens to Category 1 hurricane as storms bears down on Puerto Rico

first_imgABC New(NEW YORK) — Dorian strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane Wednesday as it lashed the U.S. and British Virgin Islands with heavy rain and took aim at Puerto Rico.After the storm passes through Puerto Rico, it will move north, potentially becoming a major Category 3 hurricane when it reaches Florida over the holiday weekend.Dorian won’t make landfall in Puerto Rico but will pass to the east of the island Wednesday afternoon and evening, bringing up to 75 mph winds, 10 inches of rain and possibly flash flooding. The Puerto Rican government said it is fully prepared for the storm’s impact. Gov. Wanda Vazquez said Monday night that the government is 90% ready to deal with any possible damage Dorian might cause.Meanwhile, many in Puerto Rico are still reeling from the devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Maria, including tens of thousands of residents living under blue tarp roofs.More than 7,400 generators and three mega generators are already on the island, according to the governor, and at least 360 shelters will open, accommodating up to 48,500 people.President Donald Trump has approved an emergency declaration, which will provide federal assistance in Puerto Rico.“The communication with all [of the president’s] aides has been extraordinary,” Vazquez said Monday.A new Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) representative is on the island assisting in response coordination.The response “will be on top of a complex recovery effort,” a FEMA spokesperson said. “Even a smaller and less severe storm could have significant impact.”Once Dorian passes through the Caribbean, it’s forecast to steer toward Florida over the Labor Day weekend.Dorian could make landfall on the East Coast of Florida on Monday morning as a major Category 3 hurricane with winds up to 115 mph. The Southeast coastline from Miami to Charleston could see impacts.Jacksonville, Florida, will activate its emergency operations center full-time as Dorian nears, Mayor Lenny Curry said at a news conference Wednesday.Curry said it’s too early to make any decisions about possible evacuations, but residents should make sure they know their evacuation zone.The storm is also impacting Labor Day travelers. Some airlines have issued travel waivers, and Royal Caribbean is closing its private island in the Bahamas for a week and altering some of its cruise ship itineraries to avoid Dorian.As the Atlantic hurricane season nears Sept. 10 — its peak — Dorian isn’t the only storm on the move. Newly-formed Tropical Storm Erin is expected to bring rough surf to the East Coast beaches from the Carolinas to New England this Labor Day weekend.Otherwise, it is not expected to directly impact the East Coast.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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