Category: sggrocur

Scottish bakers hit back at latest research on salt

first_imgScottish bakers feel unfairly targeted by the Food Standards Agency in Scotland (FSAS) which reports that consumers have not reduced their salt consumption in the last five years.Scots are eating nearly 9g per day on average 50% higher than the recommended 6g per day, according to new research similar to a previous Scottish survey in 2006. The FSAS highlighted bread as a major source of salt in the diet, but said firms such as Macphie of Glenbervie had worked hard to reduce salt.Alan Clarke, chief executive of Scottish Bakers, said craft and plant bakers in Scotland were concerned the report did not reflect the good work done to comply with the Food Standards Agency’s 2012 voluntary salt target for bread 1g of salt per 100g of final product. “Once the consumer has added butter, or a spread and a filling, the amount of salt that is consumed can be much higher than that contained within the bread itself,” he said.Macphie of Glenbervie technical director Fraser Hogg said: “Plant bakers have done a lot already to reduce salt levels and to comply with the voluntary guidelines and many bakers who use concentrates, premixes and preparations are producing products that already meet the latest FSA recommendations.”Scottish Bakers’ president Lewis MacLean, of MacLean’s Highland Bakery, added: “This report does not highlight other food categories, including takeaways, soups and sausages… as having a major impact on salt consumption levels. Since the FSA brought it to our attention, the whole industry has taken measures to reduce our salt levels.”An FSA spokeswoman said: “Bread is not necessarily high in salt, but because we eat a lot of bread, it contributes a lot of salt to our diets.”last_img read more

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News story: Ocean Way report and flyer published

first_img Press enquiries during office hours 01932 440015 The MAIB report on the loss of the stern trawler Ocean Way off the Shetlands Isles on 3 March 2017, is now published.The report contains details of what happened, subsequent actions taken and recommendations: read more.A safety flyer to the fishing vessel industry summarising the accident and detailing the safety lessons learned, has also been produced. Press enquiries out of hours 020 7944 4292center_img Press enquirieslast_img read more

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Chesterville Center Union Meeting House

first_imgThe new bell tower is lifted into position.CHESTERVILLE – Following a six-month restoration, the Chesterville Center Union Meeting House bell tower was returned to its home on top of the Meeting House on Friday, May 22.Work on the project began in November 2019 with removal of the 1,000-pound bell and the upper section of the bell tower with a crane. Long-time area contractor Ron Castonguay had the bell tower trucked to his shop in Leeds where the restoration proceeded during the winter months. Both the lower “bell deck” roof and the upper tier roof were replaced with standing seam metal roofing, new red oak timbers were milled, joined, and fastened to provide a new cradle structure for the bell, and the felloes which make up the wooden rim of the bell wheel were replaced with native white ash. Other work included some limited repairs to the bell tower framing, boarding, and trim, and a thorough paint job. While the tower was down, a critical reinforcement was also made to stabilize the queen post truss which spans the building attic and supports the north side of the bell tower.Resources for the $39,650 project included grants from the Maine Community Foundation and the Maine Steeples Fund, the Davis Family Foundation, and the Narragansett Number One Foundation. At the local level, a very generous response to a town-wide fundraising appeal in the spring of 2019, as well as benefit performances by the Franklin County Fiddlers and Down-East humorist Tim Sample all helped raise critical matching funds for the project. Early work on the project included a careful preliminary assessment by Maine Preservation in June of 2017, and an engineering assessment and design plan by Lincoln/Haney Engineering Associates, Inc. of Brunswick in the fall of 2017.The Meeting House bell.The “steel alloy” Meeting House bell was cast in Hillsboro Ohio by the C.S. Bell & Co. between 1882 and 1894. It is unknown whether the bell was purchased by the Chesterville parish at the time of its manufacture or acquired at a somewhat later date. With the tower back in place and with safe use of the bell once again made possible, a small but distanced gathering of Chesterville residents and supporters of the Meeting House celebrated Memorial Day with a 21-chime salute to honor the occasion and all those being remembered for their service and sacrifice to the country.Constructed in 1851 and the local house of worship for a century and a half, the Chesterville Center Union Meeting House today is a non-profit community resource providing a venue for community gatherings and events including arts, music, education, and enrichment. Meeting House organizers are deeply grateful for the community support shown for the bell tower project. For additional information about the Meeting House and to see more photos of the restoration and other recent projects, visit www.chestervillemeetinghouse.org.last_img read more

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Turkuaz Records Debut Live Concert Film During High-Energy Performance In Stroudsburg [Photo]

first_imgLast night, Turkuaz hit Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, performing at the Sherman Theater for a crowd of eager, rainbow-clad fans. The highly anticipated performance doubled as the filming for Brooklyn funk outfit’s debut concert film, directed by Andy Laviolette, who is also known for directing fan-favorite concert films for Snarky Puppy. The intimate evening featured two sets, drawing on classic favorites from across the band’s catalog, with the film meant to take a snapshot of where the band is at this current point in time and capture the group’s tremendous, energetic live shows in a lasting way.As Shira Elias told us in a recent interview (that will be released later this week) ahead of the filming,I think we’re all super excited, and we don’t know 100% what to expect. There’s a little bit of anticipation; we’re creating this thing that’s going to be lasting, hopefully, for a long time, and sort of represent this past era of Turkuaz, you know what I mean? It’s been building, and we’ve been working super hard at this era, and obviously, we’re trying to move forward and shoot up to the future and the next level—whatever the future of Turkuaz is going to be. So I think it’s almost nostalgic, and we’re sort of trying to represent and capture what Turkuaz has been in the past and where it came from at this time. We think we just want it to be genuine and just be like, “This is us, this is who we are,” and ultimately create that live party vibe and the energy of it all.You can check out some pictures from last night’s show and concert-film taping below, courtesy of Capacity Images.Setlist: Turkuaz | Sherman Theater | Stroudsburg, PA | 9/7/2018Set One: Chatte Lunatique, Coast To Coast, Future 86, Percy Thrills The Moondog, One & Lonely, Famous, Holy Ghost, Murder Face, Tiptoe Through The Crypto, Snap Your Fingers, Superstatic, The Generator, Picking Up, Back To NormalSet Two: Typa-Lika, The Mountain, Rule The World, Fall Asleep, Lady Lovely, Nightswimming, 20 Dollar Chill, EFN, Life In The City, Winner, Lookin’ Tough, Gogo, M’Lady, Monkey FingersEncore: Bubba SlideTurkuaz | Sherman Theater | Stroudsburg, PA | 9/7/2018 | Photo: Capacity Images Photo: Capacity Images Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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moe. Offers Two Debuts, Welcomes Emma Derhak At Night 2 In Portland [Full-Show Audio]

first_imgOn Saturday, moe. returned to Portland, ME’s State Theatre for their second performance of the weekend in The Pine Tree State. Following up a show where the Buffalo rockers spelled out “Trump Is A Lying Ass” in their setlist, moe. returned to the State Theatre with a pair of debuts, despite bassist Rob Derhak being unable to sing all weekend after losing his voice.The quintet opened up their first set with a 30-minute segue of “Moth” > “Hi & Lo” > “Puebla”, taking no time to settle into deep improvisational jam territory out of the gates. With Derhak unable to sing, Emma Derhak, Rob’s daughter and frequent moe. vocal guest, joined to lead the band through a take on her dad’s tune “Okayalright”. With a false start and pause, Emma came out and proclaimed, “I think I may know the words to this. I love this song.” Emma nailed it, with the faithful moe. crowd cheering her on and applauding.moe. continued pleasing their fans by unleashing their first debut of the night with “Dangerous Game”. The five-piece band took the hard-hitting rocker out for a 15-minute ride, highlighted by some impressive guitar interplay between Chuck Garvey and Al Schnier. With Jim Loughlin setting the groove behind his expansive percussion set up, the band moved forward with “Shoot First”, which was followed up with “Don’t Wanna Be”. moe. rumbled their back into “Moth”, to properly close out the song and bring the first set to a halt.Following a brief setbreak, moe. returned to open their second set with a monstrous near-50-minute segment, as the band navigated through “The Road” > “Head” > “Montego” > “Head” > “The Road”. The five-piece kept on chugging with the Garvey-led “Where Does The Time Go?”, off of their 2007 The Conch release. The band picked up the pace with their second debut of the evening, “Jazz Cig”, a jazzy instrumental highlighted by Laughlin on the xylophone. An 18-minute rendition of “Four” came next, with Chuck and Al firing off explosive guitar solos. moe. closed out their improv-heavy second set with “McBain”. Following Al’s standard “al.nonuncements” segment, moe. offered up a lone encore with “Wind It Up”.Listen to Saturday night’s show below courtesy of taper Ted Gakidis:moe. – 2/16/2019 (Full-Show Audio)[Audio: Ted Gakidis]This Wednesday, February 20th, moe. will cotinue their winter tour with a show at Rutland, VT’s Paramount Theatre, followed by performances at Concord, NH’s Capitol Center For The Arts on Thursday, February 21st; Brooklyn, NY’s Brooklyn Bowl on Friday, February 22nd, and New York City’s Beacon Theatre on Saturday, February 23rd.For ticketing and a full list of moe.’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: moe. | State Theatre | Portland, ME | 2/16/2019Set One: Moth > Hi & Lo > Puebla, Okayalright*, Dangerous Game#, Shoot First > Don’t Wanna Be > MothSet Two: The Road > Head > Montego > Head > The Road, Where Does The Time Go?, Jazz Cig#, Four > McBainEncore: Wind It Up* False Start, w/ Rob’s daughter replacing Rob on vocals# New SongRob had some voice problems and didn’t have any lead vocals tonightlast_img read more

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Organization screens film on first gay bishop

first_imgA bishop clothed in traditional, religious vestments strides to the front of the altar, raises his arms in a gesture of welcome to the assembled congregants. A traditional sight Sundays in churches around the world, but St. Mary’s, Putney in London welcomed a very nontraditional bishop. Bishop Gene Robinson began to preach, telling the congregants, “There is a lot of fear around, have you noticed? … It is an astounding thing, fear, and it does terrible things to us. Perhaps it is the Church that is acting most fearful right now.” As he drew breath to continue, a man in the second row stands up to scream anti-gay obscenities at the bishop until the rest of the congregants rose to their feet and drowned out his tirade with a powerfully-sung hymn, accompanied by the church’s organist until the man was thrown out of the church. This interaction is featured prominently in the film, “Love Free or Die,” which members of GALA-ND/SMC gathered to watch and discuss with Bishop Gene Robinson himself Saturday afternoon. The movie tells the story of Robinson’s work to promote lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) inclusion within his church, the Episcopalian Church, the Anglican Communion and the United States at large, while living his life with his partner Mark Andrew and their two daughters. Robinson said he has tried to live his life as a witness to the integrity of homosexual relationships and homosexuals everywhere, so that his example might change people’s minds and open their hearts. “When we discuss this issue as an issue, you can be all over the map,” Robinson said. “But when you know a real person, or when you know a real relationship there is nothing that speaks more powerfully than that. [Gay-rights activist] Harvey Milk said that coming out was the most political thing that you could do. Not standing on a soapbox, but just simply coming out and living your life openly so that people know you and know what values you hold. He predicted it would change the world and that is exactly what he’s doing.” His private life has been brought further into the world stage during his time as a bishop of the Episcopalian Church, but this spotlight has only extended the power of the love he and his partner live out in their lives, Robinson said. “I had 16 or 17 years of living it more privately before I was thrust onto the world stage, so I wasn’t just a newbie – I didn’t come out the day I was elected bishop,” Robinson said. “What I discovered during that time was that the example of me and my partner and the love that we shared and the way we raised our children changed people’s lives locally, people that we knew, and so when you get on the larger stage it just broadens the number of people [that you touch]. “They might not know you that well, but they can see what you’re doing, see what you believe in, by how you conduct your life and all of a sudden they’re unwilling to believe in all those terrible things that have been said about gay and lesbian people.” The film evidenced how Robinson directed much of his efforts toward broadening the acceptance within the Episcopal Church for homosexuals, specifically by advocating for the creation of a liturgy to bless same-sex unions and the official willingness to ordain homosexual clergy. On July, 12, 2012, the Episcopal Church approved an “official liturgy for blessing same-sex unions, enabling priests who have the approval of their bishops to bestow the church’s blessing on gay couples whether they live in a state where same-sex marriage is legal or not,” according to a July 10, 2012 article by the New York Times. Since Robinson’s ordination, one other openly partnered homosexual bishop has been elected. Mary Glasspool was elected a bishop for the Diocese of Los Angeles on December 4, 2009 as the 17th female bishop and first lesbian bishop chosen within the Episcopal Church. Throughout his work, Robinson has faced opposition taking the form of everything from the open hatred displayed by the man in St. Mary’s, Putney, to relatively civil disagreement like that displayed by Bishop Robert Duncan, his colleague in the seminary. Duncan led the departure of his diocese from the Episcopal Church in 2008, which was renamed the Anglican Diocese of Pittsburgh. Robinson said this Duncan has voiced opinions to the House of Bishops that he not only disagrees with, but knows to be untrue. “I think the division in our church, these people who left, that had a lot more to do with control and power than anything religious,” Robinson said. “They would claim otherwise, so we would have to disagree about that. Now they’re fighting over the ordination of women … once you allow schism to be the remedy, there’s no end to it. … I think leaving the table at this day and time is maybe the worst sin, because if we all stay at the table and are willing to talk about these things we will find a way through them.” Though he has faced extreme opposition even in the form of death threats and an assassination attempt, Robinson he has felt God’s presence and love throughout his advocacy work and time as a bishop. “I know it sounds like a cliché, but God has seemed palpably close during all of this. Sometimes, so close that prayer seems almost redundant,” Robinson said. “I’ve tried to be in touch with God through my prayer life and to let God be in touch with me. “Someone gave me a piece of calligraphy that said sometimes God calms the storm, but sometimes God lets the storm rage and calms his child. I feel that’s what God has done, quieted my heart and kept me calm in the middle of this raging storm.” Robinson said the success of the movement for LGBTQ inclusion and the work of individuals like himself depends on the strength of their straight allies. “I think this is one of the most important things of all,” Robinson said. We will never be more than a very tiny minority and we need desperately our straight allies to advocate for us because it’s the right thing, because they know us and know what our values are. You’ll be in places where we’re not even welcome. It’s sort of like in the ’60s, with racism, people started to – when someone would tell a racist joke – to say, ‘You’re not going to talk that way around me and if you’re going to talk that way I’m not going to be around you.’” Refusing to remain silent when anti-gay sentiment manifests itself is how straight allies can speak up for their LGBTQ neighbors and tangibly change how they are incorporated into society and its institutions, Robinsons aid. “I think straight allies have to come out too, that is to say to come out as an ally,” Robinson said. “And sometimes, they will experience too some of the negative reaction that has been a part of our lives for a very long time.” Robinson said the biggest changes will happen when LGBTQ individuals show the world that the love and acceptance they hope to receive will be mirrored in their acceptance and love of their own identities. “I think the main thing is to be who you are, as boldly and as resolutely as you can. To not walk around with your head down as if you’re ashamed of who you are, but to be proud and to live your life as fully as you can,” Robinson said. “That will change more people’s minds than you will ever know. People are watching all the time, they’re learning all the time – the question is what they are learning about you as a gay or a lesbian or a bisexual or a transgender person. “I think in large part the degree to which we are accepted is in direct proportion to how much we accept ourselves.”last_img read more

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Panel favors online posting of court records

first_imgPanel favors online posting of court records Panel favors online posting of court records Comments sought on Internet records recommendations Jan Pudlow Senior Editor As Florida enters the new world of the digital age, the general public should have access to court records over the Internet — just as anyone does walking up to the counter at the court clerk’s office — but only after measures to safeguard confidential information are in place. And lawyers will play a new role in making sure legally private information does not find its way into court files.That’s the overall balancing-act recommendation of the Supreme Court Committee on Privacy and Court Records outlined in its May 3 draft report. The next step is to hear from you, as the panel moves toward its last meeting June 22 at the Orange County Courthouse to finalize recommendations for the court.“While not always agreeing, the members have worked together to seek the best solutions. This is a hard job. The importance of public confidence and transparency in the judicial process is fundamental, but so is the importance of the privacy of persons affected by the process, including innocent third parties and victims,” said Chair Jon Mills, director of the Center for Government Responsibility and dean emeritus and professor of law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law.“We have sought to establish a balanced approach with safeguards and oversight as critical prior to publicizing information. We are seeking to keep junk information out of the records entirely and seeking a reliable process to protect information that is legally private and confidential. We want all comments and suggestions anyone may have.”Lawyers should be aware of their new responsibilities under proposed Rule 2.051, Public Access to Judicial Branch Records. Lawyers would be expected to keep confidential information out of court files, certify that it has been done, and pay the price if it hasn’t been.That bothers Fifth District Court of Appeal Judge Jacqueline Griffin, who voted with three others against Internet access, saying that Florida’s courts are not obliged to do so, and she warns lawyers that “the bull’s-eye is being painted on their backs.”“In my view, the best interests of customers — the users of the courts — have been discounted in favor of the demands of vocal and well-funded interest groups, mainly the media, which wants their access to be more convenient, and resellers of information, who want to inhale the volume and detail of information obtained in court records,” Judge Griffin told the News May 3, the day the committee met.“The really odd thing I have seen grow root and blossom in this process is the notion that the presence of personal or confidential information in court files is the fault of lawyers, and the burden of solving the problem ought to be put on lawyers’ backs. In tacit recognition that the users of the courts will suffer a loss of privacy, embarrassment, or perhaps even harm from the worldwide dissemination of court records, the committee has settled on what it calls ‘minimization’ to alleviate the damage. ‘Minimization’ means that lawyers should be forbidden to put ‘too much’ information in the court file and be forbidden to put it in ‘too soon.’ To discourage the offense of putting ‘unnecessary’ information in the court file and putting it in before it is ‘necessary’ for the resolution of some already filed motion, sanctions are recommended. Bar discipline and damage claims from aggrieved litigants and third parties predictably will follow.”Harm to users of Florida’s courts will not come from “extraneous information” in files, Judge Griffin predicts, but from what should be in court files for judges to make timely and accurate decisions.She also said it makes more sense that the custodian of the records — the clerks — should be the experts on what is legally confidential information, not lawyers.“Do we really want to have disputes decided and criminal responsibility determined in an environment where litigants and victims of crime know that everything they reveal will be electronically available worldwide and where lawyers know they can be personally liable if they give the court ‘too much’ information?” Judge Griffin asks. “Apparently, we are going to find out.”But the majority of the 15-member committee — a diverse group of lawyers, judges, court clerks, court administrators, and representatives of the First Amendment Foundation — voted for the courts to “affirmatively seek to provide general electronic access to court records,” at its March 28 meeting.Michael Froomkin, a technologically savvy professor of law at the University of Miami, voted for Internet access, but also for what he called the “very important carve-out of family law material” — such as financial information — and said the two issues “really need to be understood jointly.”“I think the committee faces a set of very difficult problems and is tackling them with great seriousness and industry,” Froomkin said April 26.“Of the many problems, the very hardest is probably how to deal with unrepresented parties. In their fear that leaving out something may have vast consequences they don’t fully understand, unrepresented parties sometimes take a ‘kitchen sink’ approach to providing information, especially in family cases where the stakes are so personal and so high. They don’t realize that everything they send the court becomes a public record and that some day it might be digitized and put online, inviting identify theft and other privacy violations,” Froomkin said.“The committee is very aware of this issue, but solving it in a way which neither compromises an unrepresented party’s rights nor subjects them to sanctions for violating rules they may not know about or understand is not an easy problem to solve.”Larry Turner, a former Gainesville judge now in private practice, was one who voted for Internet access with quality-control mechanisms.“There are three big issues that both conflict and complement,” Turner said April 26. “They are: How do we get the courts’ work done and ensure that we have the information necessary for that? How do we maintain transparency so that the citizens know what our courts do and why? And how do we protect important private information that is necessary for the courts to adjudicate issues? Remember that the right to privacy and the right to access to court information — transparency — are both enshrined in our state constitution. The big issues are hard enough. But, as the saying goes, the devil is in the details. This is a huge challenge.”Part of that challenge is the issue of abuses of public information by commercial data brokers. As revealed by the recent national headline news, ChoicePoint, the nation’s largest database company, had sold dossiers on more than 145,000 consumers, including more than 10,000 Floridians, to a ring of overseas identity thieves.The committee’s draft report acknowledges that “current laws are not adequate,” the Supreme Court cannot regulate the data industry, and urges the Florida Legislature to seize its power to do so.“The Florida Legislature. . . has significant power to protect Floridians by enactment of state laws. Of perhaps greater impact, Florida is, in this area, in a position to lead the nation by way of innovative example. The constitutional right of privacy in Florida — ‘the right to be let alone and free from government intrusion’ — is explicit and stronger than the federal right and any such right found in any other state constitution,” the committee said in its draft report.But cutting off Internet access “is not an effective means to combat ID theft, publication of embarrassing private facts, or degrading the value that some people place on ‘anonymity,’” said Jon Kaney, a Daytona Beach lawyer who represents the First Amendment Foundation.“I hope that the work product of the committee will recognize the transparency of judicial proceedings is not only essential to Florida’s tradition of openness but required by the First Amendment.. . . I think public records should be public,” Kaney told the News. “If exposure of the record to the public via ‘practically obscure’means [the traditional method of going to the courthouse and requesting the file] invades an interest of overriding importance, then the record should be exempt at the clerk’s counter, as well as on the ’Net. Otherwise, it should be out there.. . . “The Internet is a means of communication. Efforts to choke off the use of new communications means by the people are doomed to failure. The printing press had a profound impact on society, bringing about the Reformation, among other things. There was no such thing as a ‘prior restraint’ until the printing press was invented. It did not work. Neither will laws that attempt to stand in the way of the ability of people to communicate through this new means.” The draft report is available on the court’s Web site at www.flcourts.org and look for the Privacy and Court Records item. Direct your written comments to Jon Mills, Committee on Privacy and Court Records, Supreme Court of Florida, 500 S. Duval St., Tallahassee, 32399-1900; or by e-mail at [email protected] May 15, 2005 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Suffolk Cops Hosting Property Auction Wednesday

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are planning this week to auction off boats, tools, electronics and other items seized during criminal investigations.Property Section officers will also put on the auction block personal watercrafts, automotive items, household items, gun scopes and cases, snow blowers, mowers, clothing, jewelry and coins.The auction is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Property Section building next to police headquarters at 30 Yaphank Ave. in Yaphank.The event will be held rain or shine. All sales are subject to New York State sales tax. Police will only accept cash payments.Motor vehicles and motorcycles will not be sold at this auction, police noted. For more information, call 631-852-6471.last_img read more

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Many happy returns?

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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78-year-old is Australia’s first coronavirus fatality

first_imgA 78-year-old man evacuated from the coronavirus-stricken Diamond Princess cruise liner in Japan died in a Perth hospital Sunday, becoming Australia’s first fatality from the disease, officials said.The man died in the early hours of Sunday morning, a spokeswoman for the Western Australian state health department told AFP.His 79-year-old wife was also infected with the disease during the cruise and remains in a Perth hospital.Topics :last_img

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