Tag: 香草419

Ruimveldt Children’s Home feted by Guyana Marriott Hotel

first_imgIn the spirit of the season, children who reside at the Ruimveldt Children’s Home were treated to an evening of carol singing, gifts, treats and the official lighting of the Guyana Marriott Hotel’s Christmas tree.Scenes at the Guyana Marriott Hotel Christmas tree light-upIn 2014, the hotel’s management made the decision to adopt the home which accommodates approximately 20 children between the ages of two to 17 years. It also provides 24-hour care to vulnerable children selected by the Social Protection Ministry.According to General Manager of the Guyana Marriott Hotel, Eduardo Reple, hosting the event deepens the special bond between the hotel and the home and it is one that will continue.Reple noted that though the hotel has provided assistance throughout the year as it relates to renovation and other upgrades, he hopes to further extend open arms to the children of the home.A report from the Department of Public Information said the General Manager thanked the hotel’s staff for assisting in making the event a truly memorable one for the children.Students of the Bishops’ High School choir also made quite an impact with their medley of Christmas songs which garnered much attention from other curious onlookers, beside their special invitees.last_img read more

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DONALDSON MURDER: NOVEL ABOUT DEATH WINS TOP PRIZE

first_imgA NOVEL based on the life and death of IRA informer Denis Donaldson has won a top literary award.‘Return to Killybegs’ was penned by French journalist Sorj Chalandon who became a friend of Donaldson’s while working for the newspaper Libération in Belfast.It won the Académie Française prize – France’s highest literary honour. The journalist said he became sympathetic to the republican cause whilst covering the Troubles.But Donaldson’s outing as a British agent had shocked him.“It’s terrible to hear that one of your friends – a man you knew for years and years, the man who explained so much to you about Ireland and his struggle – was a traitor in his community,” said Mr Chalandon.“I never said to myself, I want to write a novel about Denis, but I was so shocked, so disappointed, it was so painful. I said to myself, I will take this and write a novel about what it means to be betrayed by someone close to you.” He said he was ‘deeply touched’ by winning the award but vowed never to write about Ireland again because of the sense of betrayal over the Donaldson affair.The agent was shot dead by dissident republicans five years ago at a family cottage near Doochary.Gardai are still hunting his killers with an inquest verdict set to go ahead next April after eight adjournments.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldaily Sell anything on www.donegaldailyclassifieds.comDONEGALDAILY.COM – FIRST FOR NEWS IN CO DONEGALDONALDSON MURDER: NOVEL ABOUT DEATH WINS TOP PRIZE was last modified: November 5th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DONALDSON MURDER: NOVEL ABOUT DEATH WINS TOP PRIZElast_img read more

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Resilience as a Driver of Change

first_imgReaders of this column have heard me argue in the past that resilience can be a motivation for taking actions that will not only make us and our families safer, but also help to mitigate climate change. Let me lay out that basic argument again.I wrote last week that climate change deniers seek to seed doubt about the realities of anthropogenic causes of climate change — and whether global warming is even happening. As the title of the 2008 book on this tactic, Doubt is Their Product, points out, if these industry-funded “experts” can convince enough people that the causes of a particular problem (whether climate change or hazards of tobacco or toxicity of flame retardants) are in doubt, policy makers can be convinced to hold off on imposing regulations that will cost industry money to implement.They have succeeded admirably in that tactic with climate change: a large percentage of the public and the majority of legislators from a certain political party believe that the jury is still out.With decision-making based on science seemingly impossible and new extraction technologies enabling us to extract ever-harder-to-reach oil and gas, what should we do to slow our greenhouse gas emissions? How can we convince people to take action? The case for resilienceAs defined by the Resilient Design Institute, “Resilience is the capacity to adapt to changing conditions and to maintain or regain functionality and vitality in the face of stress or disturbance.  It is the capacity to bounce back after a disturbance or interruption of some sort.”Designing houses and apartment buildings to achieve resilience will keep people safer in the event of a disaster of some sort — whether a hurricane that might be more intense because of a warmer ocean, an earthquake that has nothing to do with climate change, or a power outage caused by terrorists hacking into our power grid controls.You don’t have to believe in climate change to want to create safer homes for your family. It’s not a Blue State argument or one that is owned by Democrats. Indeed, I’ve observed that Tea Party libertarians are sometimes the most receptive to the resilience argument. They want to be free from the tyranny of big government, but some of them also want to be less dependent on those systems that are controlled by government — like electricity distribution and national transportation networks. Low-energy buildings are more resilientNearly nine years ago, following Hurricane Katrina, I began advancing the idea of passive survivability: ensuring that buildings will provide livable conditions in the event of extended loss of power or interruptions in heating fuel. That remains a key tenet of resilience and what I have been advancing through the Resilient Design Institute.To create a building that will maintain livable (or habitable) temperatures if it loses power or suddenly finds itself without heating fuel requires an extremely well-insulated building envelope. The house that my wife and I recently renovated — with R-45 walls, an R-60 roof, and really good windows, along with some passive solar gain through south-facing windows — will probably not drop much below 50°F even if there’s an extended power outage in the middle of winter, and keeping a fire going in our small wood stove during a power outage will be enough to keep us fully comfortable.In hot climates — whether or not one believes that all climates will be getting warmer — the same argument applies. Energy efficiency measures help to keep homes and apartments from getting too hot if they lose power and air conditioning can’t be used. Overheating in passively operated buildings is admittedly a bigger challenge than keeping them reasonably warm in the winter, but passive survivability in hot climates relies on such strategies as keeping direct sunlight out (especially on the east and west), reflecting sunlight off the roof, and slowing conductive heat gain through the walls and roof. Safer buildings that mitigate climate changeThe same strategies that keep us safe during power outages or interruptions in heating fuel result in dramatically lower energy consumption during normal operation. Our house in Dummerston is heated with a single 18,000 BTU/hour air-source heat pump — a small enough power draw that we can provide that electricity, on an annual basis, with a modest solar electric system.We can build or retrofit to these passive survivability or resilience standards for safety reasons and, in doing so, we’re doing a great deal to mitigate climate change — but you can disregard that last benefit if you don’t believe that climate change is happening.Resilience makes sense whether or not climate change mitigation is a goal. I’ve often said that it will be a huge success of the Resilient Design Institute if our arguments are touted by Rush Limbaugh in his radio program — probably unlikely, but not out of the question. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

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PM Modi to be honoured by Bill Melinda Gates Foundation for Swachch

first_imgNew York: Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be honoured later this month with the prestigious ‘Global Goalkeeper Award’ by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for his leadership and commitment to the Swachch Bharat Abhiyaan. The prime minister will also address global leaders and corporate executives at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum during his visit here for the high-level UN General Assembly (UNGA) session. Sources told PTI that Modi will be presented with the 2019 ‘Global Goalkeeper Award’, which according to the Foundation is a “special recognition” that celebrates a political leader who has “demonstrated their commitment to the Global Goals through impactful work in their country and/or globally”. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Modi will be honoured for his leadership of the Swachch Bharat Mission, which he had launched on October 2, 2014. The ambitious mission aims at accelerating the efforts to achieve universal sanitation coverage in the country by this year as a tribute to Mahatma Gandhi on his 150th birth anniversary. So far, 90 million toilets have been built to eliminate open defecation by October 2, 2019 and currently 98 per cent of India’s villages have rural sanitation coverage instead of 38 per cent four years ago. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K The Foundation will host the fourth annual Goalkeepers ‘Global Goals Awards’ on September 24. The annual awards, in five categories, are presented to leaders and individuals for their efforts in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The categories are Progress, Changemaker, Campaign, Goalkeepers Voice and the Global Goalkeeper. “These Awards tell the extraordinary stories of remarkable individuals taking action to bring the Global Goals to life and help achieve them by 2030,” the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said adding that this year, Goalkeepers will focus on the challenge of fighting global inequality to ensure that no one is left behind. In previous years, speakers at the Goalkeepers event have included former US president Barack Obama, French President Emmanuel Macron, Deputy UN Secretary-General Amina Mohammed and Nobel Peace Prize winners like Malala Yousafzai and Nadia Murad. This year, speakers at the event include the Foundation Co-Chairs, Bill and Melinda Gates, Mohammed and UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore. Modi will be attending the high-level UNGA session that begins later this month at the world body’s headquarters. He will address the world leaders at the 193-member UNGA’s General Debate on September 27. The prime minister will also be the keynote speaker at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum on September 25. Sources said after Modi’s keynote address, there will be a Q&A session with him moderated by Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies Founder Michael Bloomberg. The Forum gathers global business and government leaders to discuss innovative and collaborative ways to solve the new challenges to global economic growth, the organisation said. Past speakers at the forum include New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, former US president Bill Clinton, International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde and former UK premier Theresa May. During his visit to New York, Modi will also inaugurate the ‘Gandhi Peace Garden’, an innovative initiative to commemorate Gandhi’s 150 birth anniversary. Under this initiative, the Consulate General of India in New York, Long Island-based NGO Shanti Fund and the State University of New York-Old Westbury have entered into an agreement to plant 150 trees. The garden is dedicated in the memory of Gandhi and is a crowdsourced project, with people adopting trees in the memory of their loved ones. The garden is in an open site within the 600 acres campus of the university. “The novelty of this initiative is that it is being financed by the people. They are planting a tree, adopting a tree in memory of their parents, guru or loved ones,” sources said. As prime minister, Modi had given his maiden address to the world leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2014. Modi’s visit this month and the address at the UNGA will be his first after winning a second term as prime minister in a resounding electoral victory in May. The UN General Debate will commence on September 24 and run through September 30. US President Donald Trump, who had delivered his first address to global leaders from the General Assembly hall’s iconic green podium in 2017, will address the high-level session on the morning of September 24. The US is traditionally the second speaker on the opening day of the General Debate, after Brazil. Before arriving in New York for the UNGA session, Modi will visit Houston where he will address the Indian-American community on September 22. “Howdy, Modi!”, the Indian-American community mega-event, will be hosted by the Texas India Forum, Houston-based non-profit. The event is expected to be attended by tens of thousands of people as well as influential American lawmakers and political leaders. Several high-level summits will be held on the margins of the 74th session of UNGA. With a view to boosting ambition and accelerating actions to implement the Paris Agreement on climate change, UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres will host the 2019 Climate Action Summit on September 23 to meet the climate challenge. Modi is expected to address this summit.last_img read more

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BC protesters rally against Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline plan

first_imgSupporters of the pipeline project are scheduled to host their own rally in downtown Vancouver this afternoon.A B.C. Supreme Court judge granted Kinder Morgan an interim injunction Friday aimed at preventing anti-pipeline activists from protesting construction at two terminals in Burnaby.The injunction restricts protesters from coming within 50 metres of the facilities until Wednesday, when a hearing on the matter will continue.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) BURNABY, B.C. – Indigenous leaders and environmentalists beat drums and sang as they protested Kinder Morgan’s $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline in southern B.C. Saturday morning.Members of the Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam First Nations, who led the rally and march in Burnaby, say they want to send a message to government, the company and investors that they do not have consent to twin the existing pipeline.The Trans Mountain pipeline is set to increase the capacity of oil products flowing from Alberta to the B.C. coast to 890,000 barrels from 300,000 barrels.last_img read more

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Flood watch issued for the Pine River

first_imgUPDATE as of July 22 at 11:30 a.m. – The flood watch for the Pine River has ended.  The Pine River and tributaries have peaked at the 5 to 20 year return period flows. The Peace River and tributaries have peaked yesterday or are peaking today at about the 2 year return period flows. The rainfall is easing and the river levels are receding now or expected to recede later today. No major flood risks are expected in this region recently though small rises of river levels are still possible.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Heavy rainfall in the B.C. Peace has caused river levels to increase.The River Forecast Centre has upgraded the forecast for the Pine River and it’s tributaries to a flood watch.  Based on the current modelling, the Pine River and tributaries are expected to peak at the 10 to 20 year return period flows Saturday night or Sunday morning, similar to peak levels reached in June 2016.  The Peace River is also expected to see moderate increases in water levels. The public is cautioned to stay clear from rivers and the unstable riverbanks during this high water period.Real-Time Hydrometric Data that shows the increase in the river flow of the Pine River at East Pine.The River Forecast Centre is also maintaining a high streamflow advisory for the Peace Region, including the Kiskatinaw, Pouce Coupe and Dawson Creek rivers and their tributaries.The River Forecast Centre will continue to monitor conditions and update this advisory as conditions warrant.For more on flooding in Chetwynd, click here.  Caribou Road Services is also working to contain flooding in the South Peace.  Click here for details about that.last_img read more

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Can The Cubs Really Win This

christina: We should also remember that base stealers were 23 for 26 against Jake Arrieta, as well, so this isn’t just a Lester problem. I can see arguments that Willson Contreras might help control the damage in games that don’t feature the Lester-David Ross battery, but we’ll see.neil: Sounds like we shouldn’t be surprised if Cleveland’s baserunning makes life difficult all series for what is otherwise a scary good Chicago rotation.christina: They’ll need to try, because they only thing that’s going to take that Cubs’ defense down a notch is the friction multiple baserunners and men in motion can create. Play a static, big-inning offense where you wait around for hits, and the Cubs will find ways to kill your scoring opps. Russell-to-Baez-to-Rizzo is going to merit its own poetry.rob: The defensive skill of the Cubs infield is a major factor that stops potential base runners. It’s all too easy to get caught in a TOOTBLAN* with Javy Baez’s creativity on one side of second base and Addison Russell’s sure hands on the other. In that way, it will be strength against strength.(* Ed. note: That’s “Thrown Out On The Basepaths Like A Nincompoop,” for the uninitiated.)christina: I’m also wondering which Arrieta or Kyle Hendricks we get. That could shape the series. Take Hendricks: The Indians are the best team in baseball at killing pitches 90 mph or slower. They’re third in baseball in OPS against off-speed pitches. If anyone is going to get to Hendricks in his magical year, it might be the Indians.rob: I agree that Hendricks and Arrieta are less sure bets. Generally, a major strength of all of the Cubs pitchers is that they suppress batted ball velocity. I believe that’s a genuine skill that the Chicago rotation possesses, but it also seems like a skill that’s more variable than say, throwing 98 mph fastballs that your opponents can’t catch up to. So I wouldn’t be terribly surprised if the Cubs have a couple of disastrous starting pitching outings and get BABIP’d to death.neil: All right, let’s close this out with some official predictions. Who ya got, and in how many games?rob: I’ll take the Cubs in 6. They are the better team, and one thing we only briefly alluded to is how tired and tattered Cleveland’s rotation is. I think the Cubs will dampen Cleveland’s bullpen advantage by overworking them, and that will be enough to close the Indians out. But not easily.christina: It’s really tough, because while Cubs in 5 is probably the safest choice, there are so many things that could go wrong with that (or even just extend the series) that I’m sticking with my prediction over on ESPN.com: that the Indians find a way to win in 7. Because, how safe are the safe bets? But I’ll admit, there’s also an element of my wanting this to be an epic series, to give us something to remember beyond one of these two teams’ “curses” ending.neil: Indians in 7? Christina, I knew you were a Chicagoan, but now I see you either are not a Cubs fan, or the most quintessential Cubs fan possible.christina: Hah. Funnily enough, people mistake me for a White Sox fan, but I’m agnostic. (I’ve stuck with the team of my childhood, the A’s — hence my bitterness about Mr. Lester in 2014.) When I polled Chicagoans last week on Twitter, the second-largest group beyond the 39 percent of Chicagoans who call themselves Cubs fans who think they’ll win it all was the 31 percent who said they’re Sox fans who hope they blow it.Besides, if the Cubs win, I can claim I didn’t jinx it, right?neil: Very true, you are zigging where those not-so-covert Cubs fans we saw everywhere on Saturday night are zagging.christina: I did the double-reverse, anti-curse, non-jinx prediction. Shazam!neil: Well, I’ll split the difference and say Cubs in 7. That feels like the way this season is, and always has been, destined to end — though as we know, sometimes real baseball gets in the way of destiny, narratives and whatnot.Either way, though, it looks like one of the more entertaining on-paper World Series in recent memory. I can’t wait! VIDEO: Cleveland fooled us twice In preparation for the World Series, which starts Tuesday night, we invited ESPN MLB writer/editor Christina Kahrl and our own baseball columnist, Rob Arthur, into Slack to chat about the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians. As usual, the transcript below has been lightly edited. neil (Neil Paine, baseball editor and sportswriter): Well, we’re finally down to two teams, the Cubs and the Indians, both of whom have long championship droughts on the line. So my first question for the room is just a big-picture one: How did these teams stack up in the overall sabermetric numbers during the regular season?rob (Rob Arthur, baseball columnist): Both teams were good, but the Cubs were also great, fantastic, amazing and 10 other superlatives on top of that. In the first half of the season, they had as good a run differential as any team ever — right up there with the 1927 Yankees. They were merely dominant in the second half, but in either half Chicago was better than Cleveland: the Cubs had a +91 run differential in the second half alone, which is only 10 less than the Indians racked up all season. And, remarkably, some measures (such as cluster luck) suggest this Cubs team got unlucky.Which is not to say that the Indians were a bad regular-season team — they had the fourth-best run differential in baseball. But they also probably got a little fortunate from a cluster luck perspective, and their pitching, while solid, was also weakened due to injuries by October. So this matchup is probably a bit lopsided in favor of the Cubs, at least if we go by regular-season numbers.christina (Christina Kahrl, ESPN.com baseball writer and editor): I would think whatever metric you used, you’re going to get happy answers about the Cubs and Indians that don’t involve a stack of head-scratchy one-run outcomes or players having extraordinary seasons outside their expected range of performance. (Well, except maybe Tyler Naquin’s strikeout rate.) But across 162, these were two very good teams. Outside of the Cubs’ sporadic offensive disappearances, we’ve seen two of the best regular-season teams also play well in October. If not for injuries to the Indians’ rotation, you could have seen that these two teams belonged here months ago.There are interesting distinctions, of course. The Cubs and Indians both walk plenty, but the Indians aren’t in quite the same class when it comes to power production. But they’re both very balanced offenses, with good amounts of contact (call it BABIP or just execution on balls in play), power, patience and speed. The fun gets into the differences between how Cleveland manager Terry Francona used his bullpen to compensate when the rotation melted down, and how the Cubs churned through relief combinations before trading for Aroldis Chapman at the deadline. To some extent, both teams are where they are because of how well their answers worked out.neil: So we’re not seeing fluky teams! These two teams might legitimately be some of the very best in baseball! Seems like a departure from recent World Series history.christina: And yet — maybe it’s because I’m in Chicago — because of those injuries in the Indians’ rotation, folks are already anticipating a walkover. The last 15 years or so should perhaps suggest a little less overconfidence on this score. I can’t help but think of the 2006 or 2011 Cardinals as notable examples of underdog winners.rob: Right, and given that it’s only seven games, anything can happen.neil: Yeah, I was gonna ask because Rob mentioned that it was “a bit lopsided” — in baseball, that still doesn’t really mean either team is very likely to win over the other. At most maybe it’s 60-40, or 65-35, for the favorite?christina: Well, the Cubs should be favored, for all sorts of reasons about how awesome they are (not just because the Indians’ rotation is a shambles). And I think you’re right in terms of how far that lean should be. But I also remember “October unbeatable” Jon Lester losing a must-win game in 2014, so I tend not to believe in absolutes.rob: Yeah, and interestingly, everything from betting markets to our Elo ratings to FanGraphs’ simulations puts the probability between 60 to 70 percent for the Cubs. So that speaks again to the randomness of baseball — I think it would be hard to argue that the Cubs aren’t better than the Indians, but despite that edge they only have about a 2-in-3 chance.christina: To put it another way, this series doesn’t feel like the 1998 World Series, where there was almost no reason to watch unless you were a Yankees fan.neil: Hey! Those Padres had a pretty good seas… — ah, I can’t finish that thought. It was a rout. But this one, less so, it sounds like.Now, have we seen anything during the playoffs to make us think either team is better or worse than the yearlong numbers would indicate?rob: Yes, I think it’s fair to say that the Cleveland bullpen — and Francona’s clever use of it — gives the Indians a strong advantage that isn’t reflected in their regular-season numbers. The Cubs don’t really have anything comparable to that; although their bullpen is strong, Chapman doesn’t seem comfortable outside of the eighth or ninth innings. (Even then, he’s looked shaky at times.) I don’t think we can say with much confidence how much exactly fireman Andrew Miller is worth, in terms of series win probability. But I think he probably keeps things to closer to 60-40 than 70-30, as some outlier predictions would put it.christina: I do wonder how well the Cubs will do if the Indians get to their ’pen in the fifth, sixth or seventh innings. The Indians’ lineup has many strengths — it’s front-loaded with Carlos Santana leading off, it’s deep, and Francona isn’t afraid to use his bench. So in those middle-inning matchups, especially during games with the DH, I wouldn’t bet on Joe Maddon securing advantages as easily as he does against some NL opponents. A lot depends on whether the Indians get to the Cubs’ starters early — running up pitch counts, making them work from the stretch — and then forcing the game into the hands of relievers like Justin Grimm or Carl Edwards.neil: Speaking of the managers, this seems like it’s going to be a battle of two extremely smart, saber-savvy tacticians — perhaps the likes of which we’ve never seen before.christina: Well, let’s be fair, Howser vs. Herzog in 1985 was pretty awesome.neil: If you wanted Whiteyball, you got it with last year’s Royals. This year — well, it’s not exactly Moneyball that these two teams play, but maybe something in the same tradition at least.christina: But to your point, yes, it’s going to be a very interesting series in that regard, watching a couple of brilliant skippers with histories of putting players in a position to succeed. For those folks who say “managers don’t matter,” here are two great tacticians who are also extremely smart about how to manage people across six months, and who get the difference between managing the regular season and managing in October.rob: Yes, although Maddon’s strength seems to lie in the parts of baseball that still aren’t visible to us: chemistry, the clubhouse and getting the best performances out of players. Francona is probably good at that, too, but bullpen management is a visible manifestation of his skill, whereas the best we can do to quantify Maddon’s ability is look at how his teams consistently have positive run differentials.christina: Yeah, I wouldn’t put either over the other as far as people management. “Tito” and Maddon both deserve their reputations.neil: So, aside from the battle of managerial wits and the two bullpens, what else will you be keeping an eye on as key matchups in the series?rob: Christina mentioned above that Lester’s been incredible in the playoffs. That’s true — he’s Bumgarner-esque — but he has a critical weakness: the yips that prevent him from throwing over to first. In theory, that should make it easy to steal bases on him, but opponents have been curiously reluctant to exploit Lester’s flaw. The Dodgers tried — and failed — to do so, largely by dancing around between first and second, and Lester turned in another awesome start. But I do wonder if Francona’s tactical savvy can translate into more stolen bases and potentially weaken the Cubs’ best starter.neil: Do the Indians have base runners who might especially be able to take advantage of something like that?rob: The Indians had the third-best baserunning team in the majors, according to FanGraphs’ metrics. The Dodgers were 11th, although they had some good base stealers who just failed to convert. Jeff Sullivan posited that it’s a mental block for potential base stealers, as they are so unused to getting leads of 25 feet (or more!) that they don’t know what to do with them. That’s why I think it will mostly be a matter of Francona getting the base runners to actually take off, and not the skill of the base runners themselves. Almost any major leaguer should be able to get to second base before the throw when they have a 35-foot lead, as some of the Dodgers’ baserunners did: read more

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Austin asks for the fans support

first_imgThe Southampton footballer believes his club can only overcome their crisis if they are backed up by the team’s supportersSouthampton F.C. is currently in the 16th position in the English Premier League standings.The team has only won once in ten matches, drawing four times and losing five.But in their last five games, the club has not been able to score a single goal.And for the Saints’ forward Charlie Austin, the team can only overcome this crisis if they have the support of the fans.“I know the fans are getting frustrated and I totally understand that, but we are trying 100 percent to get the second win of the season and push on,” he told The Daily Echo.“You only have to look around and you can see that everyone is on the edge because they don’t know whether we are going to concede or score. It’s hard not to feel it.”“But that’s football though,” he said.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“They come to get behind us and they love the buzz of getting behind their football team and we are in it to provide entertainment for them.”“I know it’s a frustrating time at the moment, but just keep getting behind us and it will come,” he added.“If we weren’t creating the chances, then it would be time to worry.”📸The best images from Staplewood Campus, as #SaintsFC get ready for a #PL trip to #mancity this weekend: https://t.co/GPuSpnZZZM pic.twitter.com/zCPumvmq3b— Southampton FC (@SouthamptonFC) October 30, 2018last_img read more

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