Tag: 蒸桑拿去哪

Buckethead Gets Unbelievably Funky For Bass Solo In Atlanta [Watch]

first_imgLast night, Buckethead brought his spring tour out to the famed Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, GA, delivering music that spans the prolific artist’s lengthy career. Most well known for his guitar playing (or is he most well known for the KFC bucket?), a video captured from the performance shows Buckethead let loose, by himself, on the bass.It’s no surprise that Buckethead is such a talented bassist, as his playing technique is impeccable on the guitar. Couple that with his unbelievable body of work recording with various instruments in the studio, and you have a undeniable recipe for a great solo. After he rocks the bass, Buckethead picks up the guitar and lets loose for a soaring instrumental.Watch the magic from last night’s show below, courtesy of Jim Croy.last_img read more

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Now, ice won’t stick

first_imgA team of researchers from Harvard University has invented a way to keep metal surface free of ice and frost. The treated surfaces quickly shed even tiny, incipient condensation droplets or frost, simply through gravity. The technology prevents ice sheets from developing on surfaces, and ice that is present slides off effortlessly.The discovery, published online as a manuscript in the journal ACS Nano on June 10, has direct implications for a wide range of metal surfaces, such as those used in aircraft, refrigeration systems, wind turbines, marine vessels, and construction.The group, led by Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, previously introduced the idea that it was possible to create a surface that prevented ice by using coatings inspired by the water-repellent lotus leaf. Yet this technique can fail under high humidity, as surface textures become coated with condensation and frost.“The lack of any practical way to eliminate the intrinsic defects … that contribute to liquid condensation, pinning, freezing, and strong adhesion has raised the question of whether any solid surface,” irrespective of its topography or treatment, “can ever be truly ice-preventive, especially at high-humidity, frost-forming conditions,” Aizenberg said.To combat this problem, the researchers created a radically different technology that is suited for both high humidity and extreme pressure, called Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surfaces, or SLIPS. SLIPS are designed to expose a defect-free, molecularly flat liquid interface, immobilized by a hidden nanostructured solid. On these ultra-smooth, slippery surfaces, fluids and solids alike — including water drops, condensation, frost, and even ice — slide off easily.The challenge was to apply this technology to metal surfaces, especially since such materials are commonplace in the developed world, from airplane wings to railings. Aizenberg and her team developed a way to coat metal with a rough material to which the lubricant adheres. A coating can be finely sculpted to lock in the lubricant and can be applied over a large area on metal surfaces. In addition, the coating is non-toxic and anti-corrosive.To demonstrate the robustness of the technology, the researchers successfully applied it to refrigerator cooling fins and tested it under a prolonged, deep-freeze condition. Compared with existing “frost-free” cooling systems, their innovation prevented frost far more efficiently and for a longer time.“Unlike lotus leaf-inspired, ice-phobic surfaces, which fail under high humidity conditions, SLIPS-based ice-phobic materials, as our results suggest, can completely prevent ice formation at temperatures slightly below 0 degrees Celsius, while dramatically reducing ice accumulation and adhesion under deep-freezing, frost-forming conditions,” said Aizenberg.The new technology also helps to lower energy costs. This approach to combatting slippery metallic surfaces holds great promise for broad application in the refrigeration and aviation industry and in other high-humidity environments, where ice-phobic surfaces are desirable. For example, once the coating is applied, ice on roofs, wires, outdoor signs, and wind turbines can be easily removed merely by tilting, slight agitation, or even wind and vibrations.“This new approach to ice-phobic materials is a truly disruptive idea that offers a way to make a transformative impact on energy and safety costs associated with ice, and we are actively working with the refrigeration and aviation industries to bring it to market,” said Aizenberg.Aizenberg is also professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and director of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard.Her co-authors included Philseok Kim, a Technology Development Fellow at the Wyss Institute and SEAS; Tak-Sing Wong of the Wyss and SEAS; Jack Alvarenga and Michael J. Kreder of the Wyss; and Wilmer E. Adorno-Martinez of the University of Puerto Rico.The authors received support from the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Harvard. Part of this work was performed at the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard, supported by the National Science Foundation. In addition, the team acknowledged the Croucher Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship and the REU BRIDGE, co-funded by the ASSURE program of the Department of Defense, in partnership with the National Science Foundation’s REU site program.last_img read more

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Kamala Harris, elected V.P., has risen higher in national politics than any woman before her.

first_img– Advertisement – Kamala Harris, a senator from California and former presidential candidate, made history when she was elected vice president of the United States.Her victory represents a handful of firsts: She will be the first woman, the first Black woman, the first Indian-American woman and the first daughter of immigrants to be sworn in as vice president.- Advertisement – It also marks a milestone for a nation in upheaval, grappling with a long history of racial injustice. Over the course of her campaign, Ms. Harris has faced both racist and sexist attacks from conservatives — including President Trump — who have refused to pronounce her name correctly.The daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Ms. Harris, 56, embodies the future of a country that is growing more racially diverse every year — even if the person whom voters picked for the top of the ticket is a 77-year-old white man. She brought to the race a more vigorous campaign style than that of the president-elect, Joseph R. Biden Jr., including a gift for capturing moments of raw political electricity on the debate stage and elsewhere. A former San Francisco district attorney, Ms. Harris was elected as the first Black woman to serve as California’s attorney general. When she was elected a U.S. senator in 2016, she became only the second Black woman in the chamber’s history. Almost immediately, she made a name for herself in Washington with her withering prosecutorial style in Senate hearings.- Advertisement –center_img Beginning her presidential candidacy with homages to Shirley Chisholm, Ms. Harris was seen as a potential front-runner for the Democratic nomination, but she left the race weeks before any votes were cast. Part of her challenge, especially with the party’s progressive wing, was the difficulty she had reconciling stances she had taken as California’s attorney general with the current mores of her party.As the vice-presidential nominee, Ms. Harris has endeavored to make plain that she supports Mr. Biden’s positions — even if some differ from those she backed during the primary.And although she struggled to attract the very Black voters and women she had hoped would connect with her personal story during her primary bid, she made a concerted effort as Mr. Biden’s running mate to reach out to people of color, some of whom have said they felt represented in national politics for the first time. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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​Luxembourg reserve fund names managers for €500m global property push

first_imgOverall, the fund has a 8.5% strategic allocation to property, but currently falls far short of its 5% domestic target and at the end of 2014 only had €247m in Luxembourgish real estate.A project that will see it approach its 5% target, the ’Cité de la sécurité sociale’, is currently under development, and will see the construction of an office complex to house the domestic social security office. The fund decided last year to build up its global exposure through holdings in real estate funds to further diversify its portfolio and increase exposure to inflation-linked assets.To date, the portfolio, which returned 10.96% last year, has largely been split between fixed income – accounting for nearly 60% of assets – and equities (38.4%). Luxembourg’s €14.3bn pension reserve fund has hired two managers to oversee its €500m push into global real estate.The Fonds de Compensation commun au régime général de pension (FDC) announced its board of directors had settled on Aviva Investors and CBRE Global Investment Partners as its inaugural managers, after first tendering the vacancies in August.Each manager will be handed €250m for an unlisted global real estate mandate, part of FDC’s attempt to meet its 3.5% strategic allocation to property outside the Grand Duchy.In addition to appointing Aviva Investors and CBRE, UBS Asset Management has been appointed as standby manager, should either of the two managers seeded need to be replaced.last_img read more

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It’s the week to ‘Know Your Water’

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — The Indiana Department of Environmental Management has declared the week of March 11-17- National Groundwater Awareness Week. Officials want to remind Hoosiers about the importance of protecting and conserving Indiana’s groundwater resources.In 1999, National Groundwater Awareness Week was created to provide an opportunity for people to learn about the importance of the resource and how it impacts lives. According to the National Groundwater Association (NGWA), approximately 132 million Americans rely on groundwater for drinking water. It’s also used for irrigation, livestock, manufacturing, and several other purposes – which makes it one of the most widely used and valuable resources on the planet.In Indiana, almost 70 percent of Hoosiers rely on groundwater for their drinking water supplies. More than half of Hoosiers use individual water wells and another 2.4 million rely on public water supplies that draw all or part from groundwater.This year’s theme of “Test. Tend. Treat.” is especially important for Hoosiers who have private wells. It’s the homeowner’s responsibility to ensure their well water is safe to drink. The “Test. Tend. Treat.” method will provide some insight to understanding when to hire a water treatment professional.Test– It is recommended to sample water on a routine basis as water quality can change over time. Well water pollutants are often colorless and odorless, making detection at home difficult. For information on testing procedures and how to understand the results, please refer to the Indiana State Department of Health’s Well Water Quality and Testing page.Tend – Regular inspections of wells can protect and reduce the possibility of future issues. Annual inspections should be completed by a licensed or certified water well system professional. In between a professional inspection, well owners are encouraged to visually inspect the well to look for any warning signs including a cracked well cap, debris on or around the wellhead, or ponding or flooding around the well after storm events.Treat– Based on the type of contaminants reported in the test results there are several types of treatment options. NWGA has provided a list of options for various contaminants ranging from whole-house treatment to point-of-use treatments: org/water-treatment. More information can be found in IDEM’s Well Disinfection factsheet. For information public water distribution systems in Indiana click here. For more about National Groundwater Awareness Week click here.  For more information about the Groundwater Section in IDEM’s Office of Water Quality click here.last_img read more

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Hollie’s winning streak continues

first_img20 Apr 2015 Hollie’s winning streak continues The winning streak continues for Hollie Muse, who has just added The Leveret to her growing collection of trophies. The 15-year-old England international won the 36-hole scratch event at Formby Ladies’ only eight days after becoming the Scottish U16 girls’ open stroke play champion. Between the two successes she’s also contributed to wins for her club, West Lancashire, and her county, Lancashire. She won The Leveret by two shots from Katherine O’Connor (Tadmarton Heath) after returning scores of 74 and one-under 70, for a two-over par total. Muse, who was using a new set of clubs, had five birdies in each of her rounds, which were played in breezy conditions. She paid the price of venturing into the heather in her morning round, but overall she was satisfied with her game – and impressed the spectators by driving two of the par fours!   Only one other player beat par during the tournament. Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest), another England international, also shot 70 in the second round. Muse is a past winner of the English U13 championship and last year helped England to win both the girls’ and ladies’ Home Internationals.  She trains with the England Golf girls’ squad (image © Leaderboard Photography). Click here for full scores from The Leveret.last_img read more

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