Tag: 猪八戒网

Family Forces Dweezil Zappa To Change ‘Zappa Plays Zappa’ Band Name

first_imgFor those who caught on to Frank Zappa’s music after his untimely death, few experiences rivaled that of the Zappa Plays Zappa project. Led by Frank’s son Dweezil Zappa, the band name said it all, one Zappa playing the music of another.Only, there seems to be some contention over the use of the Zappa family name for the project. The Zappa Family Trust recently informed Dweezil that he did not have the rights to tour under the name Zappa Plays Zappa, as the last name is a trademark owned by the trust. Instead, the band will hit the road as Dweezil Zappa Plays Frank Zappa.In an interview with the New York Times, Dweezil says, “It doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue… but this is being done under duress.” He added, “My last name is Zappa; my father was Frank Zappa… but I am not allowed to use the name on its own. I’m not allowed to use a picture of him. I’m not allowed to use my own connection with him without some sort of deal to be struck.”When Frank Zappa’s window Gail Zappa passed away, control of the Family Trust went to two of Zappa’s four children, Ahmet Zappa and Diva Zappa. While the other two, Dweezil and Moon Unit, remained beneficiaries, the relationship between the siblings has been riddled with contention. Ahmet addressed the Zappa Plays Zappa situation as well, saying “I am not standing in the way of Dweezil playing the music… he would just have to be in accordance with the family trust.”Dweezil gets the final word in the article, saying “I just hope people will understand that the only thing I’m changing is the name.” The Dweezil Zappa Plays Frank Zappa tour kicks off in July.[H/t The New York Times]last_img read more

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Dr. John Closes Jam Cruise 14 Set With Energizing Performance Of ‘Iko Iko’ [Watch]

first_imgThe pro-shot videos keep coming from the masters at Jam Cruise. This week, we’ve been blessed with incredible footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing the New Orleans standard, “Iko Iko”.Dr. John and his tight band put on an incredible show for the Pool Deck crowd, running through some of his biggest hits and most favorite live covers. The show marked a true highlight for this year’s Jam Cruise, and we are so happy they decided to release this video for the rest of the world to experience.Check out this pro-shot footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing “Iko Iko” on below.Dr. John & The Nite Trippers – “Iko Iko” – Jam Cruise 14[Video: Jam Cruise]last_img read more

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Tony Winner Viola Davis Wins Oscar for Fences

first_img View Comments Viola Davis(Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) This Oscar win has filled up all them empty spaces in our hearts! Viola Davis, who took home the 2010 Tony Award for her performance in August Wilson’s Fences, received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for reprising the role on screen. This marks Davis’ first Oscar win.Davis also received a Tony Award for her performance in King Hedley II. She appeared on Broadway in Seven Guitars. Davis received Oscar nominations for The Help and Doubt. Her various on screen credits include How to Get Away with Murder, Suicide Squad, Prisoners and many more.”Here’s to August Wilson, who exhumed and exhalted the ordinary people,” Davis said in her acceptance speech.Denzel Washington, who also received a Tony Award for his Broadway performance, received an Oscar nomination for reprising his role in the film alongside Davis. Washington was also at the helm of the screen adaptation, which is nominated for Best Picture.Congrats to Viola Davis for taking the podium at both the Tony Awards and the Oscars for the same role.last_img read more

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Borlaug’s Centennial

first_imgToday, he would have turned 100. “You can’t build a peaceful world on empty stomachs and human misery,” Bourlaug once said. Today, we are reminded he was a living example of the power of science to improve the world. He was the picture of practicing what you preach. He certainly did his part to fill empty stomachs and end human misery. Borlaug developed dozens of cereal grain varieties that grew well in Asia, Mexico and Africa – areas of the world that had spent years facing mass famine and starvation. Scholars say he prevented as many as 1 billion deaths. “There can be no permanent progress in the battle against hunger until the agencies that fight for increased food production and those that fight for population control unite in a common effort,” he said during his 1970 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Today, we again face a growing population that will outpace food production if we don’t find a way to double our yields — this time with less land and less water. Borlaug was fast to point out that meeting the challenges that led to the Green Revolution took many scientists, farmers, agencies and organizations working together. The same will be true of the grand challenge before us now. And the solutions will be more complicated than before. It will take plant breeders and engineers, farmers and processors, transportation and cooperation to feed a hungry world. Technology will drive the future of agriculture and help to curb world hunger. Agriculture may be the sector of our economy where new technology can have the greatest impact in the shortest period of time. On the 30th anniversary of winning the Nobel Peace Prize, Borlaug said in a speech in Ohio, “The world has the technology – either available or well advanced in the research pipeline – to feed on a sustainable basis a population of 10 billion people.” Our college has a long history of excellence in developing the next generation of technology to provide food for the world. One area in which we have traditionally been leaders is plant breeding and genomics. Glen Burton, a world-renowned forage breeder in Tifton and a contemporary of Borlaug’s, helped turn our forage and turfgrass breeding program into a world powerhouse. Today, among our faculty, we have some of the finest plant breeders in the world improving the yield and productivity of everything from soybean and sorghum to peanuts and blueberries. Each understands the consequence of failing to meet the growing demand for food with dwindling resources. In a recent interview with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, he reflected on the Carter Center’s work with Borlaug to improve the food supply and farm income in developing nations around the world. They found, especially in Africa, most of their work was with female farmers since the women generally tend the crops. By providing plant varieties better suited to African climates, they were able to put more food on the dinner table and more income in the family budget. The work these scientists are doing today will ensure that effort continues. Someone like Norman Borlaug may only come along every 100 years, but our students, our scientists, our engineers, our teachers and our farmers share his drive, determination and curiosity. Those qualities will help usher in the next great revolution in agriculture. The vision for that quest is Borlaug’s lasting legacy to the world. Agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug was known as many things during his lifetime: Nobel Peace Prize winner, father of the Green Revolution, a persistent pioneer in the battle to end hunger. Few can dispute that during his 95 years, he was responsible for saving more human lives than anyone in history. last_img read more

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Long day-care ‘form of child abuse’

first_imgSunshine Coast Daily 16 September 2014A RESPECTED pediatrician and vice-president of the leading advocacy body for prevention of child abuse and neglect says leaving babies in long-day care can be a form of child abuse.Dr Sue Packer, Canberra’s 2013 Citizen of the Year, also believes lack of communication between parents and their children when young could be a contributing factor to Australia’s alarming rate of depression and suicide in youths.“There is a looming risk for children brought up in an untested environment (long-day care),” she said.“They are a social experiment now. We will see how much alternative care they than cope with without compromising development.”Dr Packer was a contributor to pamphlets on display at Nambour General Hospital last week titled Alternatives to Smacking Children.While Dr Packer does not support smacking a child, even a controlled smack, she said what was more damaging was the lack of attention children got.“More than anything that is changing in Australia is the connected time parents spend with their children,” she said. “It is plummeting.“Which is more damaging, the occasional smack or level of attention? I would say the level of attention.”Dr Packer questioned why parents were having children when they did not want them and enjoy them.Her sharpest criticism was levelled at parents who put their children in long-day care when they were less than a year old.“Babies in care from six weeks of age we are learning – and there is amazing research – how this affects the development of the right side of the brain,” she said.Dr Packer referred to the work of Professor Allan Shore, a leading neuroscientist at the University of California, who has done research into how parent-child interaction plays a key role in shaping the right side of infants’ brains.Dr Packer said a lack of parent-child interaction was more harmful than the occasional slap on the wrist with a hand.http://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/long-day-care-formofabuse/2388138/?ref=hsChildcare worker admits ‘daycare can be abuse’Sunshine Coast Daily 17 September 2014A CHILD care industry insider says she supports the notion that long day care can be a form of child abuse.And the Sunshine Coast worker, who asked to remain anonymous, believed many others in the industry, who witnessed the trauma some children go through when left for long days, felt the same.“Some kids are dropped off at 6.30am and don’t get picked up until after 5pm,” she said.“You see these kids and you go ‘you poor little things’, particularly when all the other parents are picking their kids up.“They are always at the door waiting, looking. It is really sad.http://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/day-care-can-be-abuse/2389726/?ref=hslast_img read more

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Pearson unfazed by fan spat

first_img Press Association The Foxes manager admitted he was unaware of any internal club probe into the heated exchange he had with a supporter during Tuesday’s 3-1 defeat to Liverpool. Fans had called on Pearson to apologise, something he refused to do on Friday, after a video emerged of him reacting to a fan in the crowd but he remained unrepentant. “I’ve been involved in tricky times in the past. I saw some clips of a banner at Arsenal and find it totally bemusing someone of Arsene Wenger’s stature and record is questioned. He can be a very emotional man himself. “I can move on from events this week.” Pearson also defended the club’s owners and said they were abused at the Liverpool game. He said: “I spoke to Susan Whelan our chief executive after the game, she unfortunately had to deal with box owners giving abuse to our owners. “I feel it incredible anybody could question the integrity of our owners. It’s nothing short of disgraceful.” Nigel Pearson insisted his angry row with a fan should galvanise his Leicester strugglers as he expects to escape a club rap. The club had said they were looking into the matter but Pearson is carrying on as normal ahead of the trip to Aston Villa on Sunday. “I’m not aware there is an investigation,” he said. “I’ve been asked a few questions but my job is to continue to manage my team, a team I played big part in developing and had considerable success with in adversity. “We’ve come through difficult times before – just not as public. Technology can be a bit of a nuisance at times.” The Foxes are bottom of the Barclays Premier League and without a win in their last nine games but Pearson hopes the controversy will unite them. “We try to come through adversity,” he said. “I’ve had run-ins with fans in the past and that’s how it is. I think the players have very strong feelings about what’s going on and feel the need to prove themselves to themselves and to other people. “It shows solidarity and a belief in what and how we’re doing. “Ultimately I’m not daft, it’s a results business and we have to change the trend sooner rather than later. You can’t expect things to go swimmingly all the time. last_img read more

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