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Buckethead Gets Unbelievably Funky For Bass Solo In Atlanta [Watch]

first_imgLast night, Buckethead brought his spring tour out to the famed Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, GA, delivering music that spans the prolific artist’s lengthy career. Most well known for his guitar playing (or is he most well known for the KFC bucket?), a video captured from the performance shows Buckethead let loose, by himself, on the bass.It’s no surprise that Buckethead is such a talented bassist, as his playing technique is impeccable on the guitar. Couple that with his unbelievable body of work recording with various instruments in the studio, and you have a undeniable recipe for a great solo. After he rocks the bass, Buckethead picks up the guitar and lets loose for a soaring instrumental.Watch the magic from last night’s show below, courtesy of Jim Croy.last_img read more

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Now, ice won’t stick

first_imgA team of researchers from Harvard University has invented a way to keep metal surface free of ice and frost. The treated surfaces quickly shed even tiny, incipient condensation droplets or frost, simply through gravity. The technology prevents ice sheets from developing on surfaces, and ice that is present slides off effortlessly.The discovery, published online as a manuscript in the journal ACS Nano on June 10, has direct implications for a wide range of metal surfaces, such as those used in aircraft, refrigeration systems, wind turbines, marine vessels, and construction.The group, led by Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, previously introduced the idea that it was possible to create a surface that prevented ice by using coatings inspired by the water-repellent lotus leaf. Yet this technique can fail under high humidity, as surface textures become coated with condensation and frost.“The lack of any practical way to eliminate the intrinsic defects … that contribute to liquid condensation, pinning, freezing, and strong adhesion has raised the question of whether any solid surface,” irrespective of its topography or treatment, “can ever be truly ice-preventive, especially at high-humidity, frost-forming conditions,” Aizenberg said.To combat this problem, the researchers created a radically different technology that is suited for both high humidity and extreme pressure, called Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surfaces, or SLIPS. SLIPS are designed to expose a defect-free, molecularly flat liquid interface, immobilized by a hidden nanostructured solid. On these ultra-smooth, slippery surfaces, fluids and solids alike — including water drops, condensation, frost, and even ice — slide off easily.The challenge was to apply this technology to metal surfaces, especially since such materials are commonplace in the developed world, from airplane wings to railings. Aizenberg and her team developed a way to coat metal with a rough material to which the lubricant adheres. A coating can be finely sculpted to lock in the lubricant and can be applied over a large area on metal surfaces. In addition, the coating is non-toxic and anti-corrosive.To demonstrate the robustness of the technology, the researchers successfully applied it to refrigerator cooling fins and tested it under a prolonged, deep-freeze condition. Compared with existing “frost-free” cooling systems, their innovation prevented frost far more efficiently and for a longer time.“Unlike lotus leaf-inspired, ice-phobic surfaces, which fail under high humidity conditions, SLIPS-based ice-phobic materials, as our results suggest, can completely prevent ice formation at temperatures slightly below 0 degrees Celsius, while dramatically reducing ice accumulation and adhesion under deep-freezing, frost-forming conditions,” said Aizenberg.The new technology also helps to lower energy costs. This approach to combatting slippery metallic surfaces holds great promise for broad application in the refrigeration and aviation industry and in other high-humidity environments, where ice-phobic surfaces are desirable. For example, once the coating is applied, ice on roofs, wires, outdoor signs, and wind turbines can be easily removed merely by tilting, slight agitation, or even wind and vibrations.“This new approach to ice-phobic materials is a truly disruptive idea that offers a way to make a transformative impact on energy and safety costs associated with ice, and we are actively working with the refrigeration and aviation industries to bring it to market,” said Aizenberg.Aizenberg is also professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and director of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard.Her co-authors included Philseok Kim, a Technology Development Fellow at the Wyss Institute and SEAS; Tak-Sing Wong of the Wyss and SEAS; Jack Alvarenga and Michael J. Kreder of the Wyss; and Wilmer E. Adorno-Martinez of the University of Puerto Rico.The authors received support from the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Harvard. Part of this work was performed at the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard, supported by the National Science Foundation. In addition, the team acknowledged the Croucher Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship and the REU BRIDGE, co-funded by the ASSURE program of the Department of Defense, in partnership with the National Science Foundation’s REU site program.last_img read more

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Will young voters decide the election?

first_img Young voters found more pragmatic than progressive In addition to registering young people to vote, such groups provide access to information about policies and candidates, as well as “the mechanics of actually voting,” said Dawn Boudwin, deputy executive director of network strategy for the Alliance for Youth Action. “We have crews on the ground: calling folks, texting folk, doing relational organizing.”Such outreach matters, she says, “because what we hear is ‘Young people don’t turn out,’ and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.” Some of this originates in the campaigns, she said. “We don’t invest in turning them out like we do with the Boomers.”The problem may be more fundamental, said Dakota Hall, executive director of LIT. Young people “are not being taught they need to be civically engaged in schools,” he said. His group is attempting to counter this with a high school program that “builds activists and lifetime voters.”“Young people are registering in high numbers. They’re turning out for events in high numbers,” said Hall, pointing to protests and successes with regional actions such as removing police officers from schools. “This is the moment that will determine their lives, especially young people of color.“It’s game time,” he added, looking ahead not only to Nov. 3 but to an energized young electorate that will keep pushing for its issues. “Folks are feeling anxious but also excited to do some amazing work.” Related Getting out the vote Fall poll finds them divided on the scope and style of change needed for the nation American voters don’t hate ambitious women, after all Tova Wang on how young people can affect democracy, in advance of National Voter Registration Day center_img Pulled to the polls Study finds some differences in attitude, though, depending on party All indications are that young voters, those 18 to 29, will line up for next month’s presidential election in record numbers, further advancing the generational shift of political power taking place in America.An online seminar Tuesday hosted by the Institute of Politics and the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation handicapped what the balloting may tell us about the future of elections and public policy priorities. At “Young Voters Could Decide the Election: Will They?,” pollsters, academics, and on-the-ground organizers shared the signs of a potential youth wave while also discussing the issues that engage young voters and the obstacles in their way.The growth in youth turnout isn’t news. Opening the Zoom panel, moderator Abby Kiesa, director of impact at the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University, discussed the “massive turnout” in 2018, which saw double-digit increases in voters aged 19‒29 in 31 states. But despite rises in participation and voter registration, she said, the complications of COVID-19 put the growing youth influence at risk.Young voters are certainly eager to be involved, said Justin Tseng ’22, co-chair of the Harvard Public Opinion Project. According to the project’s September polling, “This is going to be a youth-driven election,” he said. Indeed, the findings of the national poll of 18- to 29-year-olds point to three conclusions. “Enthusiasm is way up,” said Tseng, noting that 63 percent of respondents said they’d definitely be voting, compared with 47 percent four years ago. Intriguingly, his group also found that the issues that engage young voters have shifted. Although health care, education, and mental health remain concerns, the economy has moved to the forefront, as has the pandemic. In terms of jobs and unemployment, he noted, “Young people are bearing the brunt of COVID-19.” “This is the moment that will determine their lives, especially young people of color. It’s game time.” — Dakota Hall, executive director of Leaders Igniting Transformation Harvard students, staff step up to work elections Finally, said Tseng, young voters are leaning toward Biden by an even larger margin than they supported Obama in 2008, which saw the highest youth turnout sine 1984 (the earliest election for which the project has numbers). While enthusiasm for the Democratic candidate lags behind what it was for Obama, he reported, Biden leads by 33 percent among respondents, while Obama only had a 29 percent lead. (For more findings and results from October polling as it becomes available, see https://iop.harvard.edu/youth-poll.)These numbers are only predictions, of course, and Tseng acknowledged that self-reported “likely” voters don’t always make it to the polls. However, he noted, the gap between likely and actual voters tends to remain constant. “When we see the number of respondents saying that they’re likely voters increase, the number of voters goes up as well,” he said.Michael Hanmer, a professor in the department of government and politics at the University of Maryland, agreed. “Youth turnout is going to be through the roof,” he said. Still, Hanmer, whose studies focus on elections, public opinion, voting behavior, and political methodology, foresees potential problems. “My biggest concern is that with anything that’s relatively new, there’s the potential for mistakes,” he said. “With so many people voting for the first time or voting by mail for the first time, we have to be careful.”The work of helping young voters navigate the system is increasingly falling to advocacy groups like Wisconsin’s Leaders Igniting Transformation (LIT), a nonprofit group aimed at increasing Black and brown youth involvement, and the Alliance for Youth Action, a nationwide network of progressive youth advocacy groups.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Middle School CC Results

first_imgThe Batesville Middle School Boys won their cross country meet against Indian Creek, Shelbyville, and St. Mary’s on Thursday.  Eli Loichinger won the boy’s race, followed by Jake Chapman, 2nd, Otto Hund 3rd, Emi Lopez, 4th, Cannon Clark, 5th, Talan Rowlett, 7th, Isaac Trossman 12th, Lincoln Garrett, 16th, Santiago Schutte, 17th, Landon Raver, 19th, and Landin Hughes 20th.The Batesville Middle School Girls finished 3rd against Indian Creek, Shelbyville, St. Mary’s, and Southwestern.  Kaylynn Bedel finished 3rd in the girl’s race, followed by Megan Allgeier, 5th, and Charlotte Trossman, 15th.     Boys-Batesville 15, Indian Creek 63, Shelbyville 76, St. Mary’s 81     Girls-Indian Creek 21, St. Mary’s 61, Batesville 72, Shelbyville 96, Southwestern 112       Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Derek Suits.last_img read more

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Josh Shaw shores up corner spot

first_imgIn Saturday’s 24-14 victory at Washington, No. 10 USC’s defense shined bright.Though the offense struggled, the defense held strong and forced four Husky turnovers. Things could have gotten ugly, however, when junior cornerback Torin Harris went down with a reported concussion and did not return to the game.More to come · In limited duty this season, Josh Shaw already has two interceptions — one against Hawai’i and the other at Washington. – Carlo Acenas | Daily TrojanThe cornerback spot opposite junior Nickell Robey has been a question mark the entire season, and Harris’ injury didn’t help depth at the position. Moreover, freshman Kevon Seymour, who had been rotating the most with Harris, made the trip to Seattle, but did not suit up for unspecified reasons.But the defense’s biggest — and perhaps only — question mark might have been resolved Saturday, as sophomore Josh Shaw stepped in and played admirably. Shaw, a transfer from Florida, had practiced at cornerback intermittently the week before but had not seen significant playing time on defense before the Washington game.Shaw, who has mostly practiced at safety, drew the praise of coach Lane Kiffin for his performance against Washington.“I thought Josh did good, really,” Kiffin said. “To go in that fast at corner … that wasn’t the plan. He got forced into there by people coming out.”Shaw has had a bumpy road to USC. He began his career at Florida after a standout career at Palmdale High School in Palmdale, Calif. A high school All-American, rated a four-star prospect by Rivals.com, Shaw went to play for the Florida Gators but was injured early in his freshman season. He came back strong his next season on campus and had 22 tackles and played in 10 games.Shaw decided to transfer to USC, however, to be closer to an ailing family member. And luckily for him, he was granted a hardship waiver by the NCAA, allowing him to play without sitting out a season, per normal transfer rules.Despite his experience in the SEC, he was listed as a third-string safety on the depth chart in advance of USC’s game against Washington, mostly because of USC’s abundance of players at the position.A permanent move to cornerback might allow him to see the field more often.“I knew coming into this week I was going to end up having my opportunity to play,” Shaw said after the Washington game. “So I was just ready in all cases … whether I was going to go in at safety or corner. I came out here and I just wanted to help our team win.”Compared to Harris, who was beaten for a touchdown earlier in the game, Shaw didn’t give up any points and went largely untested.He even recorded an interception toward the end of the contest, catching a tipped pass when Washington quarterback Keith Price had the chance to narrow the Trojans’ 10-point gap.“The guy dropped the ball and I just dove for it and made a play on it,” Shaw said.Despite not playing significant minutes in any game up to this point, and mostly appearing on special teams, Shaw indicated that fatigue and rust did not affect him.“It wasn’t really difficult,” Shaw explained. “I have great players on the side of the ball with me. I have T.J. [McDonald] back there, Jawanza [Starling], so they make it a lot easier for me.”The defense was tested against Washington, as senior quarterback Matt Barkley and the offense failed to score any points in the second half. The Trojans were repeatedly tested in the passing game, but held strong due in large part to strong play from the secondary.Harris’ status is unknown at this point, as USC’s injury policy prevents Kiffin from commenting on injuries.Regardless, it is likely that Shaw will play a part in the Trojans’ defensive game plan the rest of the season because of his strong play Saturday, even though Kiffin, in Sunday’s conference call, would not fully commit to him as the starter in the spot going forward.Perhaps more importantly, Shaw was pleased with his effort overall and praised the defense’s perseverance.“What really happened was we bent but we didn’t break,” Shaw said. “Whenever that happens, I think that’s a win for us.”last_img read more

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NHL trade news: Flyers acquire G Cam Talbot from Oilers for Anthony Stolarz

first_imgHe will likely serve as the backup to rookie stud Carter Hart, who has amassed an 11-6-1 record with a .924 save percentage and 2.48 goals allowed average since coming up to the Flyers in December. He has led a charge which has seen Philadelphia get back into playoff contention after many thought they were out of it in December.Stolarz has had some success with Philadelphia this season too as he is 4-3-3 with a shutout and a .902 save percentage. Islanders will play at Nassau Coliseum in first round if they make playoffs While he has had his struggles this season, Talbot is two years removed from finishing fourth in the Vezina Trophy voting, which is for the best goaltender in the NHL. TRADE ALERT: The #Flyers have acquired goaltender Cam Talbot from the Edmonton Oilers in exchange for goaltender Anthony Stolarz. https://t.co/mzPANUwVSG— Philadelphia Flyers (@NHLFlyers) February 16, 2019The Oilers signed Talbot to a three-year, $12.5 million deal in 2016. He is in the final season of his deal now which carries a $4.166 million cap hit.Talbot came into the season as the Oilers starter, but due to struggles early he was replaced by Mikko Koskinen — who was given a contract extension during the year as well. Talbot is 10-15-3 with an .893 save percentage on the year. Related News The Oilers have officially moved on from Cam Talbot.Edmonton traded the goalie to the Flyers in exchange for another net-minder in Anthony Stolarz. Philadelphia announced the deal Saturday.last_img read more

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