Tag: 小海棠上海验证

Bako North Western set to take on Tough Mudder course

first_imgThe Bako North Western Group is set to take on one of Britain’s toughest obstacle courses, Tough Mudder, this weekend (9-10 September).A team of 12 from Bako will battle over 20 obstacle courses at Cholmondeley Castle, Cheshire, over the two days to raise funds for its charity partner Macmillan Cancer Support.In 2015, Bako set a target to raise £50,000 for the charity. Donations from the event this weekend will bring that accomplishment one step closer.The group has raised £37,000 so far through events such as The London Marathon, climbing Mount Kilimanjaro and cycling from John O’Groats to Land’s End.Hayley Salisbury, customer care co-ordinator for Bako North Western and a participant in this weekend’s event, said that despite being nervous about Tough Mudder she had been inspired by the support Macmillan provides people with cancer.“I can’t pretend that I am not nervous at the prospect of undertaking Tough Mudder; this is something I have never done and I am terrified of water,” Salisbury said. “However, I am inspired by the bravery of the people and their families facing the battle of cancer and the help and support this wonderful charity provides. It is this that will get me through on Saturday and I am very proud to represent both Bako and Macmillan”.last_img read more

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Buckethead Gets Unbelievably Funky For Bass Solo In Atlanta [Watch]

first_imgLast night, Buckethead brought his spring tour out to the famed Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, GA, delivering music that spans the prolific artist’s lengthy career. Most well known for his guitar playing (or is he most well known for the KFC bucket?), a video captured from the performance shows Buckethead let loose, by himself, on the bass.It’s no surprise that Buckethead is such a talented bassist, as his playing technique is impeccable on the guitar. Couple that with his unbelievable body of work recording with various instruments in the studio, and you have a undeniable recipe for a great solo. After he rocks the bass, Buckethead picks up the guitar and lets loose for a soaring instrumental.Watch the magic from last night’s show below, courtesy of Jim Croy.last_img read more

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Panel favors online posting of court records

first_imgPanel favors online posting of court records Panel favors online posting of court records Comments sought on Internet records recommendations Jan Pudlow Senior Editor As Florida enters the new world of the digital age, the general public should have access to court records over the Internet — just as anyone does walking up to the counter at the court clerk’s office — but only after measures to safeguard confidential information are in place. And lawyers will play a new role in making sure legally private information does not find its way into court files.That’s the overall balancing-act recommendation of the Supreme Court Committee on Privacy and Court Records outlined in its May 3 draft report. The next step is to hear from you, as the panel moves toward its last meeting June 22 at the Orange County Courthouse to finalize recommendations for the court.“While not always agreeing, the members have worked together to seek the best solutions. This is a hard job. The importance of public confidence and transparency in the judicial process is fundamental, but so is the importance of the privacy of persons affected by the process, including innocent third parties and victims,” said Chair Jon Mills, director of the Center for Government Responsibility and dean emeritus and professor of law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law.“We have sought to establish a balanced approach with safeguards and oversight as critical prior to publicizing information. We are seeking to keep junk information out of the records entirely and seeking a reliable process to protect information that is legally private and confidential. We want all comments and suggestions anyone may have.”Lawyers should be aware of their new responsibilities under proposed Rule 2.051, Public Access to Judicial Branch Records. Lawyers would be expected to keep confidential information out of court files, certify that it has been done, and pay the price if it hasn’t been.That bothers Fifth District Court of Appeal Judge Jacqueline Griffin, who voted with three others against Internet access, saying that Florida’s courts are not obliged to do so, and she warns lawyers that “the bull’s-eye is being painted on their backs.”“In my view, the best interests of customers — the users of the courts — have been discounted in favor of the demands of vocal and well-funded interest groups, mainly the media, which wants their access to be more convenient, and resellers of information, who want to inhale the volume and detail of information obtained in court records,” Judge Griffin told the News May 3, the day the committee met.“The really odd thing I have seen grow root and blossom in this process is the notion that the presence of personal or confidential information in court files is the fault of lawyers, and the burden of solving the problem ought to be put on lawyers’ backs. In tacit recognition that the users of the courts will suffer a loss of privacy, embarrassment, or perhaps even harm from the worldwide dissemination of court records, the committee has settled on what it calls ‘minimization’ to alleviate the damage. ‘Minimization’ means that lawyers should be forbidden to put ‘too much’ information in the court file and be forbidden to put it in ‘too soon.’ To discourage the offense of putting ‘unnecessary’ information in the court file and putting it in before it is ‘necessary’ for the resolution of some already filed motion, sanctions are recommended. Bar discipline and damage claims from aggrieved litigants and third parties predictably will follow.”Harm to users of Florida’s courts will not come from “extraneous information” in files, Judge Griffin predicts, but from what should be in court files for judges to make timely and accurate decisions.She also said it makes more sense that the custodian of the records — the clerks — should be the experts on what is legally confidential information, not lawyers.“Do we really want to have disputes decided and criminal responsibility determined in an environment where litigants and victims of crime know that everything they reveal will be electronically available worldwide and where lawyers know they can be personally liable if they give the court ‘too much’ information?” Judge Griffin asks. “Apparently, we are going to find out.”But the majority of the 15-member committee — a diverse group of lawyers, judges, court clerks, court administrators, and representatives of the First Amendment Foundation — voted for the courts to “affirmatively seek to provide general electronic access to court records,” at its March 28 meeting.Michael Froomkin, a technologically savvy professor of law at the University of Miami, voted for Internet access, but also for what he called the “very important carve-out of family law material” — such as financial information — and said the two issues “really need to be understood jointly.”“I think the committee faces a set of very difficult problems and is tackling them with great seriousness and industry,” Froomkin said April 26.“Of the many problems, the very hardest is probably how to deal with unrepresented parties. In their fear that leaving out something may have vast consequences they don’t fully understand, unrepresented parties sometimes take a ‘kitchen sink’ approach to providing information, especially in family cases where the stakes are so personal and so high. They don’t realize that everything they send the court becomes a public record and that some day it might be digitized and put online, inviting identify theft and other privacy violations,” Froomkin said.“The committee is very aware of this issue, but solving it in a way which neither compromises an unrepresented party’s rights nor subjects them to sanctions for violating rules they may not know about or understand is not an easy problem to solve.”Larry Turner, a former Gainesville judge now in private practice, was one who voted for Internet access with quality-control mechanisms.“There are three big issues that both conflict and complement,” Turner said April 26. “They are: How do we get the courts’ work done and ensure that we have the information necessary for that? How do we maintain transparency so that the citizens know what our courts do and why? And how do we protect important private information that is necessary for the courts to adjudicate issues? Remember that the right to privacy and the right to access to court information — transparency — are both enshrined in our state constitution. The big issues are hard enough. But, as the saying goes, the devil is in the details. This is a huge challenge.”Part of that challenge is the issue of abuses of public information by commercial data brokers. As revealed by the recent national headline news, ChoicePoint, the nation’s largest database company, had sold dossiers on more than 145,000 consumers, including more than 10,000 Floridians, to a ring of overseas identity thieves.The committee’s draft report acknowledges that “current laws are not adequate,” the Supreme Court cannot regulate the data industry, and urges the Florida Legislature to seize its power to do so.“The Florida Legislature. . . has significant power to protect Floridians by enactment of state laws. Of perhaps greater impact, Florida is, in this area, in a position to lead the nation by way of innovative example. The constitutional right of privacy in Florida — ‘the right to be let alone and free from government intrusion’ — is explicit and stronger than the federal right and any such right found in any other state constitution,” the committee said in its draft report.But cutting off Internet access “is not an effective means to combat ID theft, publication of embarrassing private facts, or degrading the value that some people place on ‘anonymity,’” said Jon Kaney, a Daytona Beach lawyer who represents the First Amendment Foundation.“I hope that the work product of the committee will recognize the transparency of judicial proceedings is not only essential to Florida’s tradition of openness but required by the First Amendment.. . . I think public records should be public,” Kaney told the News. “If exposure of the record to the public via ‘practically obscure’means [the traditional method of going to the courthouse and requesting the file] invades an interest of overriding importance, then the record should be exempt at the clerk’s counter, as well as on the ’Net. Otherwise, it should be out there.. . . “The Internet is a means of communication. Efforts to choke off the use of new communications means by the people are doomed to failure. The printing press had a profound impact on society, bringing about the Reformation, among other things. There was no such thing as a ‘prior restraint’ until the printing press was invented. It did not work. Neither will laws that attempt to stand in the way of the ability of people to communicate through this new means.” The draft report is available on the court’s Web site at www.flcourts.org and look for the Privacy and Court Records item. Direct your written comments to Jon Mills, Committee on Privacy and Court Records, Supreme Court of Florida, 500 S. Duval St., Tallahassee, 32399-1900; or by e-mail at [email protected] May 15, 2005 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Finland’s Veritas says QE could stimulate, but worries about opposition

first_imgFinnish pension insurer Veritas believes a large-scale quantitative easing (QE) programme by the European Central Bank (ECB) – expected after the bank’s governing body has met – could revitalise economic growth in the region but is worried about German opposition to the plan.Niina Bergring, CIO at Veritas, told IPE: “I am disappointed at the German stance on QE.”She said it was hard to take a view on details of ECB policy in the short term, and that Veritas did not take positions in the short term on things it could not analyse.“Slightly longer term, I have to believe the ECB can stimulate, as we are still carrying risk in our portfolio and do have European equities in a slight overweight, although again, the Germans do worry me a lot,” she said. If the ECB failed in its intentions, she warned, Europe was in some trouble. The announcement about QE is likely to come with a lot of strings attached, she predicted, adding that this will spark further analysis.“I cannot rule out that, if it is complicated and avoids joint responsibility, this may lead to vocal opinions and questions on the euro as a solid long-term currency – again,” Bergring said.With German opposition so strong – and some recent Finnish opposition materialising too – she said, a bad outcome for the euro as currency area is possible in the slightly longer term.Because of this concern, Veritas has kept a low weighting in peripheral euro government bonds.“We would rather take credit risk in companies we can analyse,” Bergring said.Meanwhile, Finnish pensions insurance company Varma has positioned itself in the run-up to the ECB’s announcement by taking on US government bonds and trimming European equities holdings.Timo Sallinen, head of listed securities at Varma, told IPE: “We have already bought more US Treasuries and reduced our European stock market exposure a bit after a nice rally.”Sallinen does not believe any eventual decision by the European central bankers has been fully priced in to the market yet, despite the drop in bond yields and weakening of the euro that has already happened.“The ECB needs to surprise the market,” he said.The bond-buying itself is likely, in his opinion, to be carried out by the ECB itself, rather than by national central banks, with the main focus of the purchases being on the debt of core countries.last_img read more

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Officials urge residents to test for Radon

first_imgVisit the ISDH at www.in.gov/isdh for important health and safety information, or follow us on Twitter at @StateHealthIN and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/isdh1. Indianapolis, In. — Radon, a radioactive gas that occurs naturally in most soil, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer and the number one cause among non-smokers. It is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year, according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates.January is National Radon Action Month, and the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) is urging homeowners to test their homes for radon because this tasteless, colorless and odorless gas can build up in homes without residents’ knowledge.“You can’t see, smell or taste radon, but it could be present at a dangerous level in your home,” said State Health Commissioner Kris Box, MD, FACOG. “By testing, Hoosiers can determine whether a high radon level is present and take steps to fix the problem to protect themselves and their families.”ISDH and the American Lung Association are partnering to provide county health departments throughout Indiana with free radon test kits to distribute to individuals in their communities. A list of local health departments can be found on the ISDH website. Residents also can purchase an inexpensive kit from most home improvement and hardware stores and through some online retailers.Radon enters homes and other buildings through small cracks and holes in the foundation, where it becomes trapped and accumulates in the air. When people breathe in radon, it damages the lungs. Long-term exposure can eventually cause lung cancer.Because radon has no taste, smell or color, a home must be tested to find out how much radon is in the air. There is no safe level for radon, but the EPA and U.S. Surgeon General recommend fixing homes that have levels at or above 4pCi/L (picocurie per liter). Nearly one-third of Indiana counties have predicted average indoor radon levels of 4 pCi/L, according to the EPA. A map of those counties can be found here.If high levels of radon are detected, licensed contractors can install mitigation systems to eliminate the problem and protect occupants of the home.To learn more about radon, visit the ISDH’s radon page at http://www.in.gov/isdh/24346.htm and the EPA’s “Citizen’s Guide to Radon” at https://www.epa.gov/radon/publications-about-radon.last_img read more

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Bukom Banku part ways with promoters

first_imgReports gathered by sporstcrusaderonline.com say Braimah Isaac Kamoko also known as Bukom Banku has parted ways with his promoters Golden Concepts and Golden Mike Promotions.The reports say Banku opted to part ways with Golden Concepts and GoldenMike Promotions because they failed to guarantee him a World Title bout which was his biggest dream.Banku, 33, currently holds the World Professional Boxing Federation Light heavyweight Belt as well as the interim WBO Africa Light Heavyweight belt and was hoping to secure World title fights this year which according to our sources could not be guaranteed by his promoters hence his decision to part ways with them.Bukom Banku has an enviable record of 26 fights 26, Wins, 20 by KO, no draws and no losses and was aiming at winning a major World title this year.“Yes Banku has parted ways with his promoters because they could not guarantee him a shot at any of the World titles he is aiming at”.Banku and his managers and promoters recently renewed their contract for another three years.  –last_img read more

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