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Apple Reportedly Acquires Shazam Music Recognition App For $400M

first_imgShazam, the app that listens and recognizes what song is playing, has been a cutting-edge product since the company’s inception in 1999. The company’s widely useful and universally in-demand audio recognition technology has put them at the forefront of the space for years, and made Shazam one of the most popular apps in the world. To “Shazam” is now widely recognized and utilized as a verb in conversation.According to a report from TechCrunch, the British company is in the process of finalizing a deal to sell Shazam to U.S. tech giant Apple for sums estimated to be north of $400M. The move will allow Apple to further improve their music delivery capabilities and make for a more immersive listening experience for their customers.In recent years, the company has extended the technology beyond helping you remember “who sings that song that’s playing right now” It also integrates with other apps like Snapchat and Apple’s Siri, and it currently sends lots of traffic to other music apps like Spotify and Apple Music, which pay Shazam when those clicks convert to purchases. The Shazam app is now used as an interactive tool for advertisers, bars and restaurants, music venues and more. Shazam’s augmented reality brand marketing service lets you discover content based on pictures that you snap with the app. “You came for music, stay to experience McDonald’s Karaoke, MTN Dew VR Racing and much more,” is the company’s pitch on this feature.It’s not clear which of these operations will carry on post-acquisition, and which of these might be something that Apple would integrate into its own business (and how), but it’s notable that much of what Shazam does is very synergistic with what Apple apple already has in place and in the works. It’s likely that the technology will be used to attract more users to the Apple Music platform.This is not the first large-scale acquisition Apple has made in the music space in recent memory. In 2014, Apple acquired Beats for more than $3B, and absorbed Beats’ executive team–including Dr. Dre, Jimmy Iovine, and Trent Reznor–into the Apple family to continue pushing the limits of the product/service they created with the help of the tech monolith. Beats became the basis for Apple Music, which has roughly 30 million users as of this Fall (Spotify has 60 million paying customers, and 140 million overall).We are excited to see what the inventive minds at Apple will be able to think up to improve the music listening experience using Shazam’s unique technology.[via TechChrunch]last_img read more

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Lessons for the next Sandy

first_imgDon’t just replace what was lost. Rebuild better, because another storm is coming.That was the message from panelists at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) on Monday who were discussing the devastation that giant storms can bring to coastal communities like those slammed by Hurricane Sandy earlier this fall.The panelists agreed that the time after a storm, when federal disaster relief dollars flow, presents an opportunity to make changes to accommodate a world gradually being affected by climate change.Coastal communities face a “trifecta” of water woes that need to be considered as they adapt to expected changes: sea level rise, storm surge, and increased precipitation, said Jerold Kayden, Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.Kayden was a panelist on a webcast called “Big Weather and Coastal Cities: Resilience in the Face of Disaster.” The forum, sponsored by the HSPH, was presented in collaboration with the Huffington Post. It was moderated by Post senior writer Tom Zeller Jr. and also featured Richard Serino, deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Authority (FEMA); Paul Biddinger, chief of Massachusetts General Hospital’s Division of Emergency Preparedness; and Daniel Schrag, director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, and professor of engineering and applied sciences.Big Weather and Coastal Cities: Resilience in the Face of Disaster Video of the panel discussion from The Forum at HSPH.The time after a disaster offers an opportunity to make positive changes, panelists agreed. Not only is rebuilding required and federal disaster relief available, but officials have the public’s attention — and approval  — to propose changes in building codes and land use patterns.Even with that receptiveness, the panelists agreed that some changes will always be difficult to get through. Compassion for storm victims, compounded by general respect for private property rights, can short-circuit a more clear-eyed assessment of whether a home should be rebuilt. Political considerations also often trump scientific ones, leading to a continuation of policies that have homes crowding vulnerable coastlines even as a warming climate promises rising seas and stronger storms.“We rebuild, but we don’t necessarily rebuild better,” Schrag said.Drawing on the lesson of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Biddinger said, one New York hospital built 12-foot-high storm walls around basement generators. But they didn’t help when Sandy rolled ashore, because there was a 14-foot storm surge, which flooded the basement and knocked out power.Although computer models provide some guidance as to what may be coming in the future, Schrag cautioned against putting too much stock in them, pointing out that the climate changes that humankind is causing on the Earth haven’t been seen for millions of years.“I promise there will be surprises. There will always be mistakes, always surprises,” Schrag said. “No matter how well we prepare, there will be system failures.”In a storm’s immediate aftermath, a lot of attention focuses on the government, even though FEMA’s job is to play a coordinating role for other responders, Serino said. The most important preparations take place in the weeks and months before a storm, when emergency plans and procedures are drafted and equipment is stockpiled. In New York, for example, officials wisely decided to shut down the subway system before the storm struck, limiting damage and allowing a faster restoration of service.Serino also praised the response of religious groups, whose existing networks often can reach those vulnerable after a disaster faster and more efficiently than government responders can. It’s critical, Serino said, for government to recognize and use existing community networks to get relief to people quickly. The most crucial response of all, though, may be that of individuals, reaching out to each other.“We saw neighbors helping neighbors, saving lives all up and down the coast,” Serino said.Hurricane Sandy has fostered a conversation on climate change and adaptation unlike previous large storms, Schrag said. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg helped with that focus, in part through his endorsement of President Barack Obama for re-election because of Obama’s concern over climate change.Sandy was an atypical storm, Schrag said. It strengthened as it moved north over unusually warm water, and it moved west to make landfall whereas most storms move east, pushed by prevailing winds. Some scientists have hypothesized that the unusual pattern may be related to shrinking Arctic sea ice, Schrag said. If that hypothesis is right, it could mean more storms will be steered to the Northeast, which would be bad news for coastal communities in the region.Although responsiveness to coastal vulnerability has been slow to grow, panelists said that some states and communities are learning the lessons of Katrina and other storms. Serino said that zoning regulations across Florida, for example, have improved because of that state’s frequent hurricanes.For better or for worse, governments and the public probably will have time to build in proper safeguards, Schrag said. Climate change will likely take decades to transform the globe thoroughly.“We’re going to be having this conversation for a very long time,” Schrag said. “We’re going to have to adapt to climate change because it’s going to be with us.” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9aboYBZyic” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/o9aboYBZyic/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Tina Sue Mannon, 46, Burden: July 13, 1967 – April 11, 2014

first_imgTina MannonTina Sue Mannon, of Burden, died Friday, April 11, 2014 at Wesley Medical Center in Wichita at the age of 46.Tina was born the daughter of Lee Roy and Charlene (Millen) Mannon on Thursday, July 13, 1967 in Winfield.Tina has worked for many years in Winfield. She first worked at the State Hospital and later transferred to the Kansas Veterans Home.Survivors include her two daughters: Shannon Mannon and Caitlin Mannon of Burden, mother, Charlene Mannon of Burden, two sisters: Michele Mannon of Burden and Christie Weber and her husband Leonard of Burden along with several nephews and a niece. Tina was especially fond of her great-nieces and nephews and enjoyed anytime she spent with them.She was preceded in death by her father, grandmother, Luella Millen and her aunt and uncle, Shirley and Rollo Iverson.Memorial services for Tina will be at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, April 17th, 2014 at the First Baptist Church of Burden.A memorial has been established in her loving memory to the Tina Mannon Memorial Fund c/o CornerBank of Winfield. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

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$25 million reward set to be paid for assistance

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Iraqi Prime Minister Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said Thursday that the $25 million bounty on Abu Musab al-Zarqawi’s head will be honored. “We will meet our promise,” al-Maliki told al-Arabiya television without elaborating. The United States had put forth the $25 million bounty for information leading to the death or capture of al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq. Al-Zarqawi, a 39-year-old Jordanian-born terrorist, was killed in a U.S. airstrike Wednesday. Also killed in the airstrike was al-Zarqawi’s deputy and spiritual adviser Abu Abdul-Rahman al-Iraqi, who had been key to pinpointing his boss’ location, U.S. military spokesman Maj. Gen. William Caldwell said. Intelligence officials identified al-Iraqi with the help of an insider in al-Zarqawi’s network and began tracking his movements, watching when he would meet with his boss. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2The U.S. also has a $25 million bounty for al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.last_img read more

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