Tag: 夜上海论坛GG

Buckethead Gets Unbelievably Funky For Bass Solo In Atlanta [Watch]

first_imgLast night, Buckethead brought his spring tour out to the famed Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, GA, delivering music that spans the prolific artist’s lengthy career. Most well known for his guitar playing (or is he most well known for the KFC bucket?), a video captured from the performance shows Buckethead let loose, by himself, on the bass.It’s no surprise that Buckethead is such a talented bassist, as his playing technique is impeccable on the guitar. Couple that with his unbelievable body of work recording with various instruments in the studio, and you have a undeniable recipe for a great solo. After he rocks the bass, Buckethead picks up the guitar and lets loose for a soaring instrumental.Watch the magic from last night’s show below, courtesy of Jim Croy.last_img read more

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Beekeeping Basics

first_imgRock Eagle 4-H Center, in Eatonton, Georgia, is working with beekeeping expert and Putnam County University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agent Keith Fielder to introduce would-be beekeepers to the tools and skills they need to raise bees. This workshop, from 9:30-11:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 20, is part of the Saturday at the Rock Education Series. Fielder, a lifelong beekeeper and former president of the Georgia Beekeepers Association, will discuss beekeeping basics and offer advice on how to start and maintain a personal colony. Appropriate for all ages, the cost for the workshop is $5 per person and includes an opportunity to visit the Rock Eagle 4-H Center Natural History Museum, following the activity. Advanced registration is required. For more information or to register, please contact Rock Eagle Program Specialist Jessica Torhan at (706) 484-4838 or by email at [email protected] Different programs take place on the third Saturday of each month as part of the Saturday at the Rock Education Series, excluding December. A complete list of Saturday at the Rock sessions may be found online at: rockeagle4h.org/ee/community/SaturdayattheRock.html. Spread it on fresh, fluffy biscuits, stir it into a steamy cup of tea or use it to soothe a sore throat. Honey has been used for a variety of culinary and medicinal applications for centuries, and it’s still in high demand today. Beekeeping is becoming increasingly popular in cities, suburbs and across rural landscapes throughout the country. Using both traditional and modern tools, today’s beekeepers are providing friends and neighbors with honey while supporting strong pollinator populations.last_img read more

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Guest column: Ending poverty takes more than charity

first_imgThey are the experts on poverty because they live it daily.That’s why back in July, we gathered with 150 people from the Capital District for a Truth Commission on Poverty, hearing testimony from people on the front lines of these crises.Their stories elicited deep emotions: sadness and heartbreak, frustration, anger and shame that our society could carry on while people struggle like this.But sad stories weren’t all we heard. We also heard stories of resistance to these systems.Minimum-wage workers who risked everything to join the Fight for $15 are raising wages for all low-wage workers in New York.Families that have suffered in the criminal justice system were leaders in the efforts to raise the age of criminal responsibility and are now fighting to end the torture of solitary confinement.Union members are taking on the largest corporations in the world to fight for fair contracts. Advocates and educators for queer and trans people of color who continually suffer discrimination and marginalization are fighting every day for dignity and respect. We cannot solve these crises with charity, however well-intentioned we may be.Connecting our struggles, trusting and following the leadership of the poor in a movement to end poverty, and refusing to perpetuate systems of poverty and inequality are our only hope as a society. In the last year of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. began to build a Poor People’s Campaign to end poverty, led by the poor themselves.This coming year, the 50th anniversary of his death, the same crises remain, and we intend to continue his work.We hope you’ll join us.Learn more about the Truth Commission on Poverty and the new Poor People’s Campaign on Tuesday, Nov. 28, from 7-9 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Schenectady, or by visiting nytruthcommission.org and poorpeoplescampaign.org.Rev. Horace Sanders Jr. is the pastor at Mt. Olivet Missionary Baptist Church in Schenectady. Rev. Dustin Wright is the pastor at Messiah Lutheran Church in Schenectady and president of the New York State Council of Churches.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists However, if we truly desire to end poverty in our communities, we must recognize that these acts of charity are not enough — and cannot be enough.By recognizing that poverty is a web of systems and structures that marginalizes and disempowers whole groups of people, we can begin to imagine changes to those systems and structures that might end the scourge of poverty.Our legislative process and our advocacy campaigns are often siloed to individual issues — the affordable housing campaign, the anti-hunger bill, the public education rally, the healthcare reforms. But for people in poverty, these issues are deeply connected.Poor families are making decisions every day between food and housing, transportation and that doctor’s appointment that keeps getting put off, and taking a second job to pay the bills or staying home to care for the kids.For many people, these issues are not distinct.By listening to the stories of the people who are most directly affected by systems of poverty, we can begin to conceive of the scope of the changes necessary.center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionThis is the time of year that, as many of us gather close with family and loved ones, we consider the ways we can help those among us who are struggling.We make donations to local charities, we volunteer, and we serve meals at soup kitchens.These efforts to serve our neighbors and communities are admirable, to be sure, and they often provide an essential lifeline.last_img read more

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Offensive-heavy lineup improves No. 5 Syracuse men’s soccer’s attack

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Kenny Lassiter avoided Hofstra defenders and passed a ball from the center of the field to the right toward Johannes Pieles, who controlled the ball with his right foot and shot it just wide of goal.One minute later, Chris Nanco managed to get a shot off at goal that also went wide. Even though neither went in, Syracuse managed to get off two quick shots in the first three minutes of the game.Against St. John’s on Sept. 4, the three Syracuse forwards had only spent one moment together on the field, and that was the one time SU was trailing in the game (and the only time all season). But in Tuesday night’s 1-0 win over Hofstra, all three started and it led to impressive results.“I thought we created enough chances during the run of play,” head coach Ian McIntyre said. “I think we played some of our best soccer tonight.”No. 5 Syracuse (6-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) has spent much of the early part of its season auditioning different players to solidify openings in the midfield, many of them natural defensive midfielders. But SU might have found its stronger lineup by dropping Nanco to attacking midfield, coupled with the return of an injured Sergio Camargo. Its offensive-heavy lineup should play a factor against No. 15 Boston College (4-1, 1-0) on Friday at 7 p.m. at SU Soccer Stadium.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPart of what made the Orange’s trio of attacking players so strong was its versatility. Nanco, Lassiter and Pieles all brought different elements — speed, strength, finesse — to the pitch and just as defenses neutralized one, another came on as a sub.That being said, playing all three of them together for a full game wasn’t going to be a sustainable plan for the future.Camargo’s return is what makes this lineup most feasible. The natural attacking midfielder dealt with a hamstring problem earlier in the season but is just now coming around.“There’s just so many things that he brings,” captain Liam Callahan said of Camargo. “It’s dangerous for the teams we’re playing against.”Camargo was the first sub on Tuesday night. He played 47 minutes while Lassiter and Pieles played 64 and 66, respectively. No other sub played more than nine minutes.Earlier in the season, McIntyre said how his midfielders needed to, and eventually would, get better on the ball in terms of controlling it and connecting passes. On Tuesday night, the first thing he said when crediting the success of the Orange’s new starting lineup was that it connected the extra pass.Syracuse managed 11 first-half shots, tied for the most in a game this season. Lassiter almost scored off a Nanco pass but Pride goalie Leonard Arkhanhelskyi made a leaping one-handed save to punch it out. Still, the constant pressure SU imposed was apparent.Playing more offensively minded midfielders means some resources are being pulled from the defense. But the SU back line isn’t concerned.“Obviously, someone could say that it’s a bit risky,” defender Louis Cross said. “But we’re confident in our ability as a back three, with Mo (Adams) there.”While Camargo’s presence might be the catalyst for this new lineup, it’s Adams’ that allows it to execute. The freshman has cemented his spot as the defensive midfielder, slowing down opponents before they even get to the back line of Cross, Miles Robinson and Kamal Miller.Nothing’s changed for the Orange in the record book. It was perfect before the lineup change and was still perfect after. But the balance provided by this new offensive-focused group could be what vaults SU to a higher level.“We’ve got some ways that we can change for our team as well as for opponents,” McIntyre said. “ … Tonight, I think it was a good step in the right direction.” Comments Published on September 14, 2016 at 11:47 pm Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langercenter_img Related Stories Johannes Pieles’ late header pushes No. 5 Syracuse past Hofstra, 1-0Syracuse men’s soccer’s defense stars in 2nd straight shutoutlast_img read more

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