Tag: 上海龙凤419

Mandatory curfew on Palm Beach starts Tuesday at 9 p.m.

first_imgOfficials announced a mandatory curfew in the town of Palm Beach to prevent the spread of coronavirus.  It is set to start Tuesday night at 9 p.m. and end at 6 a.m. each day.Officials say exceptions will be for town residents, town ID holders and medical personnel. And all public beaches and the Phipps Ocean Tennis Center are shutting down.No curfews have been instituted elsewhere in Palm Beach County or the Treasure Coast.last_img

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Florida man accused of tying dog to golf cart and dragging it on the road

first_imgA 79-year-old man is now facing animal abuse charges after he tied his German Shepard to his golf cart and began dragging the dog on a road.The incident occurred in Fort Walton beach near Eglin Parkway and Highway Avenue.Witnesses say the saw the suspect, Dean Woodyatt, driving his golf cart in the road with the dog tied to it and tried to stop him. Woodyatt, however, refused to pull over even when the dog collapsed.A good Samaritan was eventually able to chase Woodyatt down, however, Woodyatt prevented anyone from helping the animal.When authorities arrived, Woodyatt tried to flee the scene but was immediately stopped and taken into custody.The dog, was taken to an animal hospital where it died from heat-related injuries.While no official charges have been filed against Woodyatt as of yet, the Panhandle Animal Welfare Society says they are looking at their options.last_img read more

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DeSantis Considers Replacements for Palm Beach County Circuit Judge

first_imgTwo Palm Beach County court judges are among a list of six lawyers who have been nominated to replace Circuit Judge Edward Artau, who was recently elevated to the 4th District Court of Appeal.County Judges August Bonavita and Bradley Harper are on the short list of candidates that was sent to Gov. Ron DeSantis to consider for Artau’s seat.Also on the list that was sent to DeSantis last Friday are: assistant state attorneys Laura Laurie and John Parnofiello, South Florida Water Management District attorney Judith Levine, and Melanie Casper, a former public defender who now works at the state attorney’s office.The local judicial nominating commission also nominated six attorneys to replace County Judge Paige Gillman, who was promoted to Circuit Judge Jessica Ticktin’s seat after Ticktin announced that she is stepping down in January.The commission has asked that Casper, Parnofiello and Laurie be considered for both spots, a request that is unusual.Others who have been nominated to replace Gillman are: Magistrate Peter Bassaline, assistant state attorney Michael Rachel, and West Palm Beach defense attorney Schnelle Tonge.DeSantis has 60 days to make a decision.last_img read more

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Bad behavior on social media can cost recruits

first_imgIn this Monday, Aug. 5, 2013, file photo, Duke coach David Cutcliffe chats with players as they stretch during an NCAA college football practice in Durham, N.C. A growing number of college coaches are watching the social media behavior of student athletes, including Cutcliffe. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)At St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Mobile, Alabama, the high school that produced Crimson Tide quarterbacks AJ McCarron and Jake Coker, there’s a new preseason ritual for football players: the social media talk.It’s about more than minding their manners. Coach Steve Mask warns players not to post about injuries, which can scare away recruiters. Committing on Twitter to a school is also discouraged — one recent former player tweeted commitments to four different schools without informing any coaches.“He came across as being not reliable,” Mask said. “He gets a little joy out of the attention, but it’s not worth it.”This season, Mask is taking his players’ online personas so seriously that he’s assigning an assistant to monitor their accounts. As college programs increasingly use Twitter, Instagram and other social media accounts to evaluate a player’s character, one wrong comment can cost a scholarship offer.That was the case recently at Penn State for offensive line coach Herb Hand, who took to Twitter recently to vent his frustration with a recruit gone bad online.“Dropped another prospect this AM due to his social media presence … Actually glad I got to see the ‘real’ person before we offered him,” Hand tweeted.At Penn State media day last week in State College, Pennsylvania, Hand said that his wife scolded him for the tone of the tweet. Cruel, maybe, but fair.“You want to recruit guys with strong character,” he said. “Somebody messaged me, ‘Sometimes kids are worried more about being a character than having character.’”Yes, teens do tweet the darndest things, but Hand and other coaches say it’s usually fairly easy to differentiate between a cringe-inducing post and one that raises a serious red flag on a prospect.“There’s a difference though when you’re talking about information that may be degrading to women, referencing drug use, and anything that has to do with cyberbullying and stuff like that. There’s certain things you don’t want to be part of your program,” Hand said.Hand, who is one of the most active and engaging college coaches you’ll find on Twitter, is not alone in cutting off a recruit because of the player’s use of social media.“It’s happened this year and this recruiting class,” Duke coach David Cutcliffe said. “It’s just insane what some of them think’s OK. When I know it’s them and I read it and I see some of the things out there, if I’m on the road, I’ll call a coach — let his high school coach know we’re no longer interested. And I’ll call back to (Duke director of football relations) Kent McLeod or the people in the office and say I want him dropped off the database. No more mail. Nothing.”NCAA rules regarding contact between recruits and football coaches have become more restrictive in recent years. Coaches can’t text recruits and opportunities to meet face-to-face have decreased. As social media has become more ubiquitous, it has helped coaches fill the information gap in recruiting.Arkansas coach Bret Bielema said social media is now part of his standard checklist for recruits.“He’s got to have a GPA that I can relate to, an ACT or SAT score or a pre-ACT score, and the third box is for social media,” Bielema.“I distinctly remember a player last year who signed, was a big-time kid, had an interest in us, and his Twitter handle was something that I can’t repeat in here. I just kind of said, what are we doing here? This is about as obvious as it gets about what kind of thing we’re dealing with here, so we backed out altogether.”Hand said he tries to educate high school coaches who might be behind the curve in online communication. And he often tries to educate players he’s recruiting about how to avoid social media missteps.“If you talk to a guy and he doesn’t adjust things, that’s another red flag for you,” he said. “If they’re not going to take coaching on this, what are they going to do on third-and-short when you need them to make a block and they kind of do their own deal?”Bruce Rollinson, who is starting his 26th season as coach of southern California powerhouse Mater Dei High School, said he added the social media talk to his routine about three years ago, borrowing some of the dos and don’ts USC gives its athletes.“Don’t harass anybody,” Rollinson said, focusing mostly on the don’ts. “Don’t bring up race, religion, sexual orientation and physical conditions.”South Carolina freshman defensive back Chris Lammons said he got the message in high school and cleaned up his Twitter act, despite what his friends were doing.“In the transition from being a little kid to a man, that’s the thing you have to do, because when you’re growing up, you probably want to get a big time job somewhere and they look back at your Twitter account and they see the things you’re putting out,” Lammons said.___AP sports writers Kurt Voigt in Fayetteville, Arkansas; Joedy McCreary in Durham, North Carolina; and Pete Iacobelli in Columbia, South Carolina, contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Working to Help Animals

first_imgScouts from Daisy Troop 1662 in Fair Haven with members of the Palazzo family of Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals after presenting a $325 check to the foundation. The kindergartners earned money, beginning in January, by cleaning and doing chores around their homes and neighborhood to help animals in need of love and rescue. The group looks forward to the donated money being used to help the rescue and rehabilitation work of the foundation’s annual grantees.last_img

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RURAL BROADBAND SCHEME NOT PROPERLY ADVERTISED, SAYS TD

first_imgDonegal North East TD Charlie McConalogue has called on the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte to extend the deadline for applications to the Rural Broadband Scheme by at least a month. The application process is currently due to close this Friday, 29 July 2011.Deputy McConalogue said:  “This scheme has been poorly advertised and I believe there are many people out there who are unaware that they are eligible to apply or that the deadline is this week.“Minister Rabbitte recently announced that over 2000 applications had been received by 8th July 201, however there is no doubt in my mind that there are still many rural dwellers in Donegal and across the country without broadband access who have not yet submitted applications. “In this day and age, internet access is necessary not a luxury.  While there has been significant progress over the years, it has not gone far enough.  Rather than pay lip-service to rural communities, I am asking the Minister to extend the deadline for applications to the Rural Broadband Scheme until at least the end of August.“The job of processing the applications already submitted can continue. But given that the scheme was not adequately publicised, and extension to the deadline might encourage more people to apply.”RURAL BROADBAND SCHEME NOT PROPERLY ADVERTISED, SAYS TD was last modified: July 27th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie McConaloguerural broadband schemelast_img read more

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Ventilation for Passive House Multifamily Projects, Part 2

first_imgThis is Part 2 of a two-part series. Here is a link to the first article in the series: “Ventilation for Passive House Multifamily Projects, Part 1.” In climates with significant heating or cooling seasons, Passive House projects must have a balanced heat-recovery or energy-recovery ventilation system. These systems use a heat exchanger to transfer heat and moisture between the outgoing and incoming air streams. A heat-recovery ventilator (HRV) transfers heat from the outgoing exhaust air stream to the incoming fresh air stream during the winter (or vice-versa during the summer). An energy-recovery ventilator (ERV) transfers heat and moisture from the exhaust air stream to the fresh air stream in winter (or vice-versa during the summer). The operation of recovery ventilators reduces the energy required to heat and cool, and in the process decreases the building’s carbon footprint.RELATED ARTICLESHRV or ERV?Commissioning ERVsMisconceptions About HRVs and ERVsPreventing Frost Buildup in HRVs and ERVsRating Windows for Condensation Resistance What the industry has learned from the development of airtight buildings and programs such as Passive House and R2000 is that indoor relative humidity must be controlled; in some seasons, this can be achieved through continuous ventilation. Deciding between an HRV and an ERV gets more complex when the Passive House concept is scaled from a single-family home to a multifamily program. The extremely airtight building envelope required of a Passive House combined with high internal moisture gains from an occupant-dense multifamily program (coming from occupants, kitchens, and bathrooms) forces additional moisture management considerations during mechanical ventilation design. Maintaining acceptable interior relative humidity in both the heating and cooling season is paramount for building durability and occupant comfort. It’s appropriate that Passive House professionals claim this simple motto: “Build Tight, Ventilate Right!” Comparing summer and winter operation In New York City (Climate Zone 4A), where the multifamily Passive House market is rapidly growing, there is a significant heating season and a demanding cooling season with high humidity. With this seasonal variation there are four primary operating scenarios for an HRV or ERV that need to be considered during design. Summer Condition – HRV An HRV operating in the summer (hot-humid exterior air and cool-dry interior air) introduces additional moisture to the building through ventilation. Heat is transferred from the incoming outside air stream to the exhaust air stream leaving the building. This cools the supply air, but exterior moisture is not removed from the incoming air. The building’s dehumidification load increases as a consequence of additional moisture from the outdoor air. Winter Condition – HRV An HRV operating in the winter (cold-dry exterior air and warm-moist interior air) exhausts the moisture generated by building occupants. Heat is transferred between the two air streams at the recovery core, but moisture in the exhaust air is not transferred to the supply. As a result, controlling interior relative humidity in the winter can be less challenging with an HRV. Summer Condition – ERV An ERV operating in the summer (hot-humid exterior air and cool-dry interior air) reduces the amount of moisture in the outside air that is delivered to the interior. Heat and moisture are transferred to the exhaust air stream, reducing both the cooling and dehumidification loads associated with ventilation. Winter Condition – ERV An ERV operating in the winter (cold-dry exterior air and warm-moist interior air) transfers both heat and humidity to the supply air at the recovery core. As a result, controlling interior moisture levels can be more challenging with winter operation of an ERV. In summer, outdoor humidity is a factor Project teams should evaluate these situations and identify the highest risk scenario in relation to their climate and building program. The overarching Passive House design intent is to reduce both the heating and cooling demand, decrease equipment size and annual energy consumption, while maintaining occupant comfort and building durability. Being mindful of the Passive House Design intent will help guide this conversation. Let’s consider the primary operating conditions, starting with summer operation. Good Passive House design should result in decreased cooling loads and thus, smaller cooling equipment capacity. An HRV introduces additional moist air to the conditioned building in the summer. This may be problematic if there is a need for dehumidification but there is no need for sensible cooling because the temperature in the space is already low. Since dehumidification will only happen when the cooling system is running (unless supplemental dehumidifiers are installed), the occupants might experience prolonged periods of high humidity and discomfort. Generally speaking, residential occupants are comfortable with higher summer setpoint temperatures only if the indoor relative humidity is kept between 40% and 60%. If the latent load cannot be met and the relative humidity increases beyond 60%, the majority of occupants will no longer be comfortable. As such, ERV operation in the summer may be desirable when you consider that an ERV will aid in removing moisture from the incoming air and help maintain a lower dehumidification load. This aligns with the Passive House design intent to maintain occupant comfort and reduce annual energy consumption. In winter, indoor condensation is a risk Now let’s consider the winter operation. When evaluating the risk to building durability, winter building operation poses the highest condensation potential. During cold periods, heat is conducted through the building envelope. This can result in cold interior surfaces ideal for condensation especially at the least efficient components, such as windows and doors. Condensation risk is increased by moisture generated in an occupant-dense multifamily building; the higher the interior relative humidity, the higher the surface temperature where condensation can form. Even with high-performance window components, the risk of condensation on windows and doors may be present when the interior relative humidity is high and surface temperatures are near the dew point. Mitigating the risk of interior condensation must be considered during the selection of an HRV or ERV. As a worst case, let’s assume an internal setpoint temperature of 68°F and window frame U-value of 0.275 Btu/hr·ft2·F (1.56 W/M2.K). With an exterior ambient temperature of 14°F (-10°C), frame surface condensation would occur at 60% indoor relative humidity. With an exterior ambient temperature of 4°F (-15°C), frame surface condensation would occur at 50% indoor relative humidity. While these relative humidity levels may seem high, they can be easily realized in a new building with a dense population. It is not uncommon in our multifamily projects to have up to six people living in less than 1,000 square feet. The amount of moisture generated by occupant perspiration, cooking, and showers in addition to construction moisture in a new building can easily drive interior RH to these levels. Even intermittent window condensation can be problematic from the perspective of mold growth and building durability. Condensation should be avoided in all buildings but should never occur in a Passive House where the design intent is focused on durability. Controlling indoor humidity during winter Remember that an ERV operating during the winter transfers some of the moisture generated inside the building back to the incoming supply air. An HRV operating under the same winter conditions exhausts internally generated moisture, helping to control indoor relative humidity and condensation risk. This seems like a cut-and-dried argument for the exclusive use of HRVs, right? It is not that simple. The amount of moisture that is re-circulated by an ERV can be decreased with a centralized system through various control strategies and because the moist air from one apartment will be mixed with a much greater volume of air headed back to the ERV. This is in contrast to unitized ERVs, where the majority of the internal moisture gains would be returned back to the supply air of each apartment. If we assume that all apartments are not experiencing high humidity levels at all times, the shear mixing of these streams will reduce the amount of moisture that can be returned to any one apartment. (For more on HRV/ERV system arrangements, see the first article in this series: Ventilation in a Passive House Multifamily, Part 1). During periods when most apartments are likely to see increased humidity, such as the early morning and evening, moisture transfer of a central ERV can be controlled with partial recovery core bypass or by controlling the speed of the enthalpy wheel. This acts to reduce the latent moisture transfer efficiency from return to outdoor air streams. As a consequence, the sensible heat transfer efficiency is also reduced temporarily. Our analyses show that supply air relative humidity can be reduced 10 to 15 percentage points with moisture recovery control. This additional functionality makes central ERVs a viable option for multifamily Passive House in winter. The data shown below represents a multifamily Passive House building operating a central ERV in a New York City winter. The analysis assumes an equal mix of low, medium, and high humidity generation scenarios, demonstrating possible apartment types in a multifamily building. Winter building operation showing decreased supply air relative humidity resulting from central ERV enthalpy wheel speed reduction. The interior relative humidity peaks in the morning and evening at 55%. With the addition of moisture recovery control and a decreased enthalpy wheel speed, the peak relative humidity is decreased by 10 to 15 percentage points, to 45%. There is no prescriptive path for HRV or ERV selection. However, centralized ERVs can be operated to control supply air moisture content in both winter and summer. This makes ERVs an attractive option for multifamily Passive House buildings in New York City.   Thomas Moore is a certified Passive House consultant and a building systems analyst with Steven Winter Associates, Inc.last_img read more

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La Salle foils Pasaol, UE

first_imgFire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Mbala pumped in 39 points in 23 minutes, marking the third time this season that he reset a personal scoring high, while front court partner Tratter fired 24 points as the Archers pulled away early before surviving a late onslaught by the Warriors anchored by Pasaol, who scored 18 points in the final frame.While La Salle picked up its fifth win in six games ahead of its finals rematch with Ateneo on Sunday, it was Pasaol’s brilliance for the still winless Warriors that made what was an otherwise routine victory for the Archers even more memorable.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“He was just in the zone,” Mbala said of Pasaol, who shot 20-of-30 from the field.“He was shooting very well and we didn’t do a good job. Knowing that La Salle is a defensive minded team, we have to do better than that. We should have gotten him out of his comfort zone.” Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Next Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View comments University of the East coach Derrick Pumaren hopes the fighting performance against the Archers will serve as a “springboard” for the Warriors as they face fellow cellar-dweller University of Santo Tomas on Saturday.“This is the first time that even though we lost, I was really proud of the way we played,” said Pumaren.“The team that has been missing the past five games showed up. Alvin (Pasaol) was awesome tonight. He could have scored 60, but he really gave us a really good show.”“I wouldn’t have done it without my teammates’ help,” said Pasaol, who also had eight rebounds and four steals.Earlier, Sean Manganti scored on a putback with a second remaining as Adamson nipped University of the Philippines, 73-71, to gain a share of third spot with Far Eastern U.ADVERTISEMENT Manganti’s tip-in off a Papi Sarr miss broke the deadlock and boosted the Falcons to their fourth victory in six games, while sending the Fighting Maroons to a second straight defeat for a 3-3 slate.“I guess we were lucky to win that game,” said Adamson coach Franz Pumaren. “I guess this is a good test on our part that in crucial moments of the game, we can survive.”Manganti also broke up the Maroons’ final play intended for Paul Desiderio as they collected their third straight victory. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNot even the highest individual scoring performance in recent memory was enough to stop La Salle from sustaining its winning run ahead of its showdown with fierce rival Ateneo in UAAP Season 80.University of the East forward Alvin Pasaol exploded for 49 points, but the Green Archers also drew career-best outputs from Ben Mbala and Abu Tratter in a 106-100 victory Wednesday night at Smart Araneta Coliseum.ADVERTISEMENT Deaf personalities everyone should know PLAY LIST 04:26Deaf personalities everyone should know05:01What the Deaf want the hearing to know01:24Life lessons the hearing can learn from the Deaf01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight NU, Adamson close in on PVL finalslast_img read more

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Megadeths Dave Mustaine To Open Soup Kitchen In Haiti

first_imgMegadeth frontman Dave Mustaine has announced that he is funding a soup kitchen in Haiti.“I really am trying to live my life differently today, and part of that was in finding something to believe in,” he wrote on Facebook. “One of the things that has happened since I started this transformation is getting involved with helping widows and orphans, and helping the homeless.“I was approached with an opportunity, and thanks to your unwavering support, my family and I have been able to fund a soup kitchen in Haiti with a ministry called, “Outside The Bowl,” and you will be proud to know that when it is started (which will be very soon), we will be feeding up to 8,000 meals a day to the less fortunate.“I am so very grateful, and I love you all so very much, because even when I am being vilified and having my character assassinated, I can find comfort knowing up to 8,000 meals will be served each day, along with a healthy serving of love and some spiritual nourishment as well.”last_img read more

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Bill Bailey Becomes Youth Music Ambassador

first_imgThe multi-talented musical comedian Bill Bailey has joined Youth Music as a celebrity supporter.Bill Bailey Becomes Youth Music AmbassadorCredit/Copyright: Youth MusicYouth Music is very pleased to announce that stand-up comedian and musician Bill Bailey has become one of their Ambassadors. He joins their other Ambassadors – including Myleene Klass, Goldie and Sir James Galway – supporting them to provide life-changing music-making opportunities for children and young people with least opportunity.Bill Bailey said: “I’m delighted to become an Ambassador for Youth Music. I discovered the joys of music-making as a teenager and music has been a huge part of my life ever since. I can’t imagine life without it and I believe every child should have the opportunity to make music in whatever way they like, whether it’s singing, getting involved in music production or even playing the theremin!

“The music projects Youth Music supports around the country, especially with their focus on children with least opportunity, make a huge difference to thousands of young people’s lives, not just in developing their musicality but in raising their self-esteem and broadening their horizons in terms of what they can achieve in life.”

Youth Music’s Executive Director, Matt Griffiths said: “We are thrilled to have Bill Bailey become one of our Ambassadors. His musical genius is as astonishing as his versatility across so many instruments. His stage shows combining all this with humour are a joy to behold. We are indebted to him for his support.”
Something which particularly resonates with Bill is Youth Music’s concern at the low level of participation in school music qualifications. Under 1% of A level entry is accounted for by music students.“Sadly, I was the only kid in my year to take an A level in music and it’s unfortunate that interest in music as a school subject is so low. I know this is something Youth Music cares about and I’m glad. I think it’s important that children feel encouraged to take music as a subject at school, it’s very rewarding.”Youth Music aims to address this issue by offering some new perspectives on how young people’s interest in learning music can best be harnessed.Their Fresh Thinking for Music Education breakfast seminar on Wednesday 24 July will tackle this subject. Leading figures from the music business, including BBC Radio 1 presenter Jen Long, veteran music critic Pete Paphides and Chris Price (formerly Head of Programming at online music discovery service Last.fm) will offer their insight into the latest ways young people are engaging with music.Online viewers will be able to watch the seminar live from 8.45am on Youth Music’s YouTube channel. Questions for the Q & A session can be tweeted using the hashtag #ymseminar, and you can follow them at @youthmusic.Find out more about Youth Music here.Source:Youth Musiclast_img read more

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