Tag: 上海私人会所价格表

Dr. John Closes Jam Cruise 14 Set With Energizing Performance Of ‘Iko Iko’ [Watch]

first_imgThe pro-shot videos keep coming from the masters at Jam Cruise. This week, we’ve been blessed with incredible footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing the New Orleans standard, “Iko Iko”.Dr. John and his tight band put on an incredible show for the Pool Deck crowd, running through some of his biggest hits and most favorite live covers. The show marked a true highlight for this year’s Jam Cruise, and we are so happy they decided to release this video for the rest of the world to experience.Check out this pro-shot footage of Dr. John & The Night Trippers performing “Iko Iko” on below.Dr. John & The Nite Trippers – “Iko Iko” – Jam Cruise 14[Video: Jam Cruise]last_img read more

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Notre Dame Outing Club offers students opportunity to experience nature

first_imgSophomore Ryan Wigglesworth, president of the Notre Dame Outing Club, wanted to create a space where he could share his passion for the outdoors. This nature-oriented club existed a few years ago, but Wigglesworth wanted to revamp the program.“An outing club was something that I really wanted when I was looking at colleges,” Wigglesworth said. “Notre Dame didn’t really have that, so that was my motivation when starting the club up.”Wigglesworth created the club last spring, and the 2019-2020 academic year is the club’s official kick off. The club is holding its first day trip Saturday, where 21 students will travel to Warren Dunes State Park in Michigan. Leadership of the club is currently working on plans for the rest of the year with possible outings including a backpack trip, a ski day, kayaking and short hikes, Wigglesworth said. The club is open to all Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students. No prior outdoors experience is necessary.“We’re trying to have a variety of activities, so there’s room for everyone to come on with a range of skill levels,” he said. “I would encourage anyone who is interested to sign up and try it out, even if it’s just for one afternoon.”The club has an official Instagram account, @outingclubnd, where the group will share pictures and stories from a variety of trips. Instagram has been one way Wigglesworth and the other officers have reached students with an interest in the club.“I have been pretty overwhelmed by the amount of attention the club has gotten,” Wigglesworth said. “At the activities fair, we got 270 people to sign up which was pretty cool, and the Instagram has exploded.”Freshman Mary Kate Temple is one of the new members of the club participating in the trip to Michigan this weekend. Temple has never visited Warren Dunes, but she said she is excited to explore the area with her classmates.“I knew coming to Notre Dame that I wanted to join a hiking or outdoors club,” she said. “I’m hoping to meet new friends from the club, and also get to spend some time in nature to get away from all of the stress and busyness of campus.”Wigglesworth said he hopes to create an atmosphere where students can connect with others who share similar interests. He also acknowledged the positive impact that nature has had on his life and his desire to share his passion with students across the Notre Dame community.Wigglesworth spoke to the club’s goal of venturing off campus to foster community. “Something that we really want to focus on as a club is doing more outside trips that aren’t at Notre Dame,” Wigglesworth said. “I think it’ll help students break out of patterns and find new stuff to do over the weekend, as well as create a community of outdoors-minded people here on campus. This club is special to me because I like being outdoors a lot, and I also like other people who like being outdoors a lot, so I’m hoping it will attract others who feel the same way.” Tags: nature, Outing Club, Warren Duneslast_img read more

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Panel favors online posting of court records

first_imgPanel favors online posting of court records Panel favors online posting of court records Comments sought on Internet records recommendations Jan Pudlow Senior Editor As Florida enters the new world of the digital age, the general public should have access to court records over the Internet — just as anyone does walking up to the counter at the court clerk’s office — but only after measures to safeguard confidential information are in place. And lawyers will play a new role in making sure legally private information does not find its way into court files.That’s the overall balancing-act recommendation of the Supreme Court Committee on Privacy and Court Records outlined in its May 3 draft report. The next step is to hear from you, as the panel moves toward its last meeting June 22 at the Orange County Courthouse to finalize recommendations for the court.“While not always agreeing, the members have worked together to seek the best solutions. This is a hard job. The importance of public confidence and transparency in the judicial process is fundamental, but so is the importance of the privacy of persons affected by the process, including innocent third parties and victims,” said Chair Jon Mills, director of the Center for Government Responsibility and dean emeritus and professor of law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law.“We have sought to establish a balanced approach with safeguards and oversight as critical prior to publicizing information. We are seeking to keep junk information out of the records entirely and seeking a reliable process to protect information that is legally private and confidential. We want all comments and suggestions anyone may have.”Lawyers should be aware of their new responsibilities under proposed Rule 2.051, Public Access to Judicial Branch Records. Lawyers would be expected to keep confidential information out of court files, certify that it has been done, and pay the price if it hasn’t been.That bothers Fifth District Court of Appeal Judge Jacqueline Griffin, who voted with three others against Internet access, saying that Florida’s courts are not obliged to do so, and she warns lawyers that “the bull’s-eye is being painted on their backs.”“In my view, the best interests of customers — the users of the courts — have been discounted in favor of the demands of vocal and well-funded interest groups, mainly the media, which wants their access to be more convenient, and resellers of information, who want to inhale the volume and detail of information obtained in court records,” Judge Griffin told the News May 3, the day the committee met.“The really odd thing I have seen grow root and blossom in this process is the notion that the presence of personal or confidential information in court files is the fault of lawyers, and the burden of solving the problem ought to be put on lawyers’ backs. In tacit recognition that the users of the courts will suffer a loss of privacy, embarrassment, or perhaps even harm from the worldwide dissemination of court records, the committee has settled on what it calls ‘minimization’ to alleviate the damage. ‘Minimization’ means that lawyers should be forbidden to put ‘too much’ information in the court file and be forbidden to put it in ‘too soon.’ To discourage the offense of putting ‘unnecessary’ information in the court file and putting it in before it is ‘necessary’ for the resolution of some already filed motion, sanctions are recommended. Bar discipline and damage claims from aggrieved litigants and third parties predictably will follow.”Harm to users of Florida’s courts will not come from “extraneous information” in files, Judge Griffin predicts, but from what should be in court files for judges to make timely and accurate decisions.She also said it makes more sense that the custodian of the records — the clerks — should be the experts on what is legally confidential information, not lawyers.“Do we really want to have disputes decided and criminal responsibility determined in an environment where litigants and victims of crime know that everything they reveal will be electronically available worldwide and where lawyers know they can be personally liable if they give the court ‘too much’ information?” Judge Griffin asks. “Apparently, we are going to find out.”But the majority of the 15-member committee — a diverse group of lawyers, judges, court clerks, court administrators, and representatives of the First Amendment Foundation — voted for the courts to “affirmatively seek to provide general electronic access to court records,” at its March 28 meeting.Michael Froomkin, a technologically savvy professor of law at the University of Miami, voted for Internet access, but also for what he called the “very important carve-out of family law material” — such as financial information — and said the two issues “really need to be understood jointly.”“I think the committee faces a set of very difficult problems and is tackling them with great seriousness and industry,” Froomkin said April 26.“Of the many problems, the very hardest is probably how to deal with unrepresented parties. In their fear that leaving out something may have vast consequences they don’t fully understand, unrepresented parties sometimes take a ‘kitchen sink’ approach to providing information, especially in family cases where the stakes are so personal and so high. They don’t realize that everything they send the court becomes a public record and that some day it might be digitized and put online, inviting identify theft and other privacy violations,” Froomkin said.“The committee is very aware of this issue, but solving it in a way which neither compromises an unrepresented party’s rights nor subjects them to sanctions for violating rules they may not know about or understand is not an easy problem to solve.”Larry Turner, a former Gainesville judge now in private practice, was one who voted for Internet access with quality-control mechanisms.“There are three big issues that both conflict and complement,” Turner said April 26. “They are: How do we get the courts’ work done and ensure that we have the information necessary for that? How do we maintain transparency so that the citizens know what our courts do and why? And how do we protect important private information that is necessary for the courts to adjudicate issues? Remember that the right to privacy and the right to access to court information — transparency — are both enshrined in our state constitution. The big issues are hard enough. But, as the saying goes, the devil is in the details. This is a huge challenge.”Part of that challenge is the issue of abuses of public information by commercial data brokers. As revealed by the recent national headline news, ChoicePoint, the nation’s largest database company, had sold dossiers on more than 145,000 consumers, including more than 10,000 Floridians, to a ring of overseas identity thieves.The committee’s draft report acknowledges that “current laws are not adequate,” the Supreme Court cannot regulate the data industry, and urges the Florida Legislature to seize its power to do so.“The Florida Legislature. . . has significant power to protect Floridians by enactment of state laws. Of perhaps greater impact, Florida is, in this area, in a position to lead the nation by way of innovative example. The constitutional right of privacy in Florida — ‘the right to be let alone and free from government intrusion’ — is explicit and stronger than the federal right and any such right found in any other state constitution,” the committee said in its draft report.But cutting off Internet access “is not an effective means to combat ID theft, publication of embarrassing private facts, or degrading the value that some people place on ‘anonymity,’” said Jon Kaney, a Daytona Beach lawyer who represents the First Amendment Foundation.“I hope that the work product of the committee will recognize the transparency of judicial proceedings is not only essential to Florida’s tradition of openness but required by the First Amendment.. . . I think public records should be public,” Kaney told the News. “If exposure of the record to the public via ‘practically obscure’means [the traditional method of going to the courthouse and requesting the file] invades an interest of overriding importance, then the record should be exempt at the clerk’s counter, as well as on the ’Net. Otherwise, it should be out there.. . . “The Internet is a means of communication. Efforts to choke off the use of new communications means by the people are doomed to failure. The printing press had a profound impact on society, bringing about the Reformation, among other things. There was no such thing as a ‘prior restraint’ until the printing press was invented. It did not work. Neither will laws that attempt to stand in the way of the ability of people to communicate through this new means.” The draft report is available on the court’s Web site at www.flcourts.org and look for the Privacy and Court Records item. Direct your written comments to Jon Mills, Committee on Privacy and Court Records, Supreme Court of Florida, 500 S. Duval St., Tallahassee, 32399-1900; or by e-mail at [email protected] May 15, 2005 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Jamaica’s National Security Minister also condemns murder of school girl

first_imgOn Tuesday Jamaica’s National Security Minister, Dr. Horace Chang, followed the junior minister in the ministry of education in condemning the recent cruel and brutal attacks on Jamaican children. In condemning the murder of a 14-year-old school child, whose body was found on Sunday, three days after she had been reported missing, Minister Chang said the child’s death was “shameful and un-Jamaican.”“We are concerned about the attacks on our children and young girls in particular. The heinous, barbaric nature of the crimes are appalling and reflect concerning lows in our society’s conscience,” Chang said in a statement.The authorities said that the mutilated body of 14-year-old Raven Wilson, a third form student of Ocho Rios High School in St Ann, was found in a plastic bag, meters away from her home on Sunday.Chang said he would be engaging the police high command on the way forward to address this disturbing trend. “We must take steps to ensure that these perpetrators understand they will be pursued and tried to the full extent of the law.Minister of State in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Floyd Green, had condemned the murder as “cruel, inhumane and barbaric. “I am seriously disturbed by the killing of yet another promising young girl, whose life was cut short by cold and heartless criminals. There is simply no justification for such cruelty against our children. The level of violence being meted out against them needs to stop, because it is robbing them of their right to life,” he added.The human rights group, Hear The Children’s Cry is calling for the prosecution of persons involved in carrying out criminal acts on children.In a statement condemning the murder of Wilson, the group said “we have not even gone ten months of the year and nearly 40 children have already been murdered during 2018. That is double the usual gruesome annual statistic.last_img read more

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