Month: June 2021

Sam Tuitupou citing decision

first_imgSam Tuitupou, the Munster player (No 12) today (Wednesday, 13 October) appeared at the ERC Offices in Dublin for a disciplinary hearing before an independent judicial officer as a result of a citing complaint arising from the Round 1 Heineken Cup match between London Irish and Munster at the Madejski Stadium on Saturday, 9 October.The citing complaint was for a dangerous tackle in contravention of Law 10.4(j) (which is specifically concerned with lifting a player and dropping or driving him into the ground).  In particular, Mr Tuitupou was alleged to have committed a dangerous tackle of that type on London Irish scrum half Paul Hodgson (No 9).Mr Tuitupou pleaded not guilty to the citing complaint.  After considering the evidence and hearing submissions on behalf of Mr Tuitupou and from Roger O’Connor, ERC’s Disciplinary Officer, the independent judicial officer, Simon Thomas (Wales), determined that Mr Tuitupou had committed the act of foul play and imposed a suspension of three (3) weeks. Mr Tuitupou will be free to play again on 1 November, 2010.Under the Disciplinary Rules for the 2010/11 Heineken Cup, independent judicial officers are required to follow the sanctioning regime laid down by the International Rugby Board.  Accordingly, having found that Mr Tuitupou had committed an act of foul play, the independent judicial officer was required to determine the ‘entry point’ for Mr Tuitupou’s suspension, based on an assessment of the seriousness of his actions. In this case, the independent judicial officer determined that the appropriate ‘entry point’ was lower end, ie three (3) weeks based on (among other things) Mr Tuitupou’s recklessness and the injuries sustained by Mr Hodgson.  The independent judicial officer increased the suspension from the entry point by one (1) week to take into account the need for a deterrent to combat this type of offending, and then balanced this by decreasing the suspension by one (1) week to take into account Mr Tuitupou’s conduct at the hearing, which resulted in the final suspension of three (3) weeks.The independent judicial officer ordered Mr Tuitupou to pay costs. The possible ‘entry points’ for an infringement of Law 10.4(j) are lower end: three (3) weeks; mid-range: six (6) weeks; and top end: 10 weeks or more.  Having determined the appropriate ‘entry point’, the independent judicial officer was then required to consider whether that ‘entry point’ should be varied to take into account any mitigating factors (such as the player’s conduct, remorse and plea) and any aggravating factors (such as his previous record and any need for deterrence).center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Cox and Leck sign up to Bradley’s battle plan

first_imgWATFORD, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 12: Sean Cox of Sale looks on during the Aviva Premiership match between Saracens and Sale Sharks at Vicarage Road on September 12, 2010 in Watford, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Sean Cox at SaleNew Edinburgh head coach Michael Bradley today strengthened his squad ahead of season 2011/12 by finalising deals to bring Sean Cox and Chris Leck to the capital.Cox, a lock forward, and scrum-half Leck were both previously with Sale Sharks, and become Bradley’s first signings since the former Ireland captain took charge earlier this month. The pair will join up with the rest of the squad when pre-season training begins on 6 June, and could make their Edinburgh debuts against their previous employers.Bradley takes his team to Edgeley Park for a pre-season friendly on Friday 19 August (kick-off 7.45pm), a week before Newcastle Falcons visit Murrayfield (Friday 26 August, kick-off 7.30pm) in a tie that will see the first airing of a series of exciting measures designed to improve the match-day atmosphere at the stadium in the new campaign.Cox brings with him the experience of 64 outings in the English Premiership, a dozen of them in season 2010/11, in addition to 16 appearances in the Heineken Cup and Amlin Challenge Cup. He has represented England from Schools to under-21 level, and is a former Sale Sharks Breakthrough Player of the Year. Born in Lancaster, the 26-year-old can also play on the flank.Leck, meanwhile, saw service with Preston Grasshoppers, Calder Vale, Manchester, Sedgley Park before joining the Sharks. The 25-year-old has played 11 times in the Premiership and five times in Europe as well as representing England at under-16 and under-18 level.Bradley hailed the addition of the players as a “terrific boost” ahead of the resumption of Celtic League and Heineken Cup hostilities. He said: “It’s great news for the club that we’ve secured Sean and Chris and that they’ll be here right from the first day of pre-season training in a couple of weeks’ time. The players are used to the sort of demanding environment and competitions in which Edinburgh operate, and they’ll both bring quality and appetite to their respective positions. “We’re still in the process of adding to what is already a strong squad full of international players. What we’ve got to offer is a team and club committed to continued improvement on and off the field, and it’s then a case of identifying the right players and characters to contribute to that progress.”Cox told www.edinburghrugby.org: “I’ve been really impressed by what Michael has had to say on his vision for the team, and I’m delighted to have become part of his plans. I’m looking forward to getting to know the rest of the lads in the next couple of months and to helping them push on next season.”Leck is equally energised by the prospect of turning out in the black and red, saying: “Edinburgh is a great club and city to be based in, and I’m delighted to have joined. I know all about the quality of player we’ve got at scrum-half, but I’ll be doing everything I can to stake my own claim and repay the faith the club have shown in me.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sean CoxPosition: lock forwardDate of birth: 16 January 1985Place of birth: LancasterHeight: 6ft 5inWeight: 113kgRepresentative honours: England Schools, England under-18, under-19, under-21Chris LeckPosition: scrum-halfDate of birth: 21 May 1986Place of birth: ManchesterHeight: 5ft 9insWeight: 88kgRepresentative honours: England under-16, under-18last_img read more

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Chill-out chat with Sevens superstar Dan Norton

first_imgDUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – DECEMBER 03: James Rodwell of England holds Dan Norton aloft as they celebrate their 29-12 victory during the Final match between England and France on Day Three of the IRB Dubai Sevens at the Sevens Stadium on December 3, 2011 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. RW: Any bugbears? DN: Footballers diving. And people who say they’re not angry when they really are. Chris Cracknell is always shouting “I’m not angry!”RW: What’s your idea of a dream holiday? DN: Picturesque, blue seas and good food, like Bali or Thailand.RW: What’s your dream car? DN: A Bugatti Veyron.RW: What are your nicknames? DN: Denzel by the boys. And Strawberry by my dad, who’s called Aubrey, which rhymes.RW: How do you switch off from rugby? DN: By socialising with friends, playing Xbox with Rodders (James Rodwell) and Mat, or walking the dogs.RW: What can’t you live without? DN: My iPhone.RW: What last made you laugh? DN: I’m happy, I laugh at everything!RW: How would you like to be remembered? DN: As a legend, a happy, nice guy. And a millionaire!RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? DN: I’d like to make a million as fast as I could! But I’d spend it on a car or something and be back to square one.This article appeared in the February 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Sevens star Dan NortonRUGBY WORLD: What do you love about playing sevens? Dan Norton: Playing in the sun is one of the perks of the job. You get your hands on the ball more and, especially for a winger, you get to have a lot of freedom of expression.RW: What’s your favourite sevens destination? DN: Hong Kong is surreal but great. The whole place is geared up for the sevens tournament and everyone takes the week off work to follow it. We got to the final last time we were there too.RW: What are the best and worst things about going on tour? DN: The best is the weather, culture and lifestyle. When it’s cold and snowing in England, we’ll be on a sunny beach somewhere! But the worst is being away from family and friends for weeks at a time. At times, towards the end of a trip you’re counting down the days ‘til you can go home.Xbox mates: Dan Norton and James RodwellRW: What do you miss most about home? DN: My girlfriend Samantha, the dogs and playing on my Xbox.RW: Any phobias? DN: I dislike seagulls and touching spiders.RW: And bad habits? DN: I’m very stubborn, and I don’t listen to what the boys say. I’ve not got a long attention span.RW: Who are the jokers in the squad? DN: Everyone has their own banter but Rob Vickerman and Mat Turner are jokers. Mat’s a very crude, small man!RW: Can you share any practical jokes? DN: Before the Commonwealth Games some of the boys texted me pretending to be from Nike, wanting to pay me for a photo shoot. This went on for three days, and they even made me text a picture of myself in my boxers!RW: Who are the best and worst room-mates? DN: In terms of the best, everyone’s on the same level but the worst is definitely Nick Royle. He’s got a massive nose and he can’t breathe through it so he snores.RW: What are your top three albums? DN: I don’t buy many albums but I do like Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy and Shock Value by Timbaland.RW: What three things would you take with you to a desert island? DN: Wifi, my phone, and John Brake. He’s pretty adventurous and he can’t sit still, so he’d help me pass the time.RW: Who would be your three dream dinner-party guests? DN: Mat Turner and Nick Royle. Nick’s like a poor man’s Karl Pilkington. And Lewis Hamilton. I’d like to find out what’s going on inside his head. I want to shake him and say, “Go back to winning!”RW: Any superstitions? DN: I tend to dress left sock then right, left shoe then right, but it’s more of a habit than a superstition. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

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Win a year’s subscription in RW’s SuperBru pools!

first_imgYou can sign up for Rugby World’s Aviva Premiership pool here. Predict this!: Manu Tuilagi scored some points of his own in the Aviva Premiership final for Leicester TigersThink you know your rugby? Well we can put that to the test on Rugby World’s exclusive SuperBru prediction leagues for the Aviva Premiership and RaboDirect Pro12!Sign up today for the chance to win one year’s free subscription as you try to out-think friends, family, colleagues and other readers of Rugby World in one or both of the magazine’s competitive pools.Not only is the game free: it’s easy too. Once you have registered with SuperBru, all you have to do is select which teams you think will win at the weekend and by how many points you think they will triumph. At the end of every round you will be rewarded with points for guessing a win, how close you were to the winning margin and you may even receive bonus points. At the end of it all, the player at the top of each pile will receive the magazine for free for a year. Remember to sign up before the first round of games starting this Friday, though. You can sign up for Rugby World’s RaboDirect Pro12 pool here.Good Luck!center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Malakai Fekitoa: New Zealand’s latest centre of attention

first_imgFekitoa is light years in front of where Ma’a Nonu was at the same age. An innate ability to create overlaps by running hard lines before deftly shipping the ball onto a wider player in one deft movement sets him apart there. Nonu was merely a battering ram earlier in his career, but improved kicking and distribution to become a fantastically well-rounded footballer. If Fekitoa develops in a similar manner, we have a global superstar on our hands.Attacking weapon: Highlanders’ Malakai Fekitoa shows his strength and speed against the LionsOne thing is for sure, the Highlander possesses incredible drive – his mentality is perhaps the most striking thing about him. On receiving the All Blacks call-up, he wept with joy and rang his mother on Tonga’s Hapa’ai Islands. She has looked after him and his 14 siblings on her own since the death of Fekitoa’s father Eni following a car crash eight years ago.Remarkably, a 14-year-old Malakai had not yet started playing rugby at that point. As a youngster, an accident left him with a dislocated hip that made walking difficult for a whole year. He had to learn to run again, eventually being selected to tour New Zealand with Tonga’s sevens side in 2009. Fekitoa caught the eye, won a scholarship to Wesley College outside Auckland – alma mater of Jonah Lomu – and was snapped up by the Blues.Almost comically soft-spoken for such a ferocious athlete, he says intense fitness work in the off-season has allowed him to capitalise on the Highlanders’ gamble. Only qualifying for an All Black jersey on the three-year residency rule, Fekitoa would ruffle a few feathers should he get selected. But the current debate on the rugby relationship between the Pacific Islands and New Zealand is not for prospective players to get worked up about. It’s tough to begrudge him the chance to win a World Cup and ensure his family never go without.Outstanding Blues lock Patrick Tuipulotu is the other potential debutant among Hansen’s party. Given Brodie Retallick and Sam Whitelock are fairly tough to shift from the engine room, his best bet for Saturday is a bench berth. It’s different for Fekitoa, who appears to be in a straight shoot-out for the No 13 shirt with Conrad Smith, excellent but ageing. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THE PROMOTION process in modern boxing is just as important as what goes on inside the ring. Alongside press conferences and trash talking, an essential part of all this is the broadcaster’s tagline for any given bout. For instance, George Groves’s knockout loss to Carl Froch on Saturday was termed ‘Unfinished Business’ by Sky Sports.As the Six Nations finished on a bright note for England, ‘The Reality Check’ seemed a good moniker for their summer tour to New Zealand. Following a first Triple Crown in 11 years and a 50-point thrashing of Italy, Stuart Lancaster’s young side would head Down Under to see exactly where they stood.To most – though crucially not those inside the camp – such optimism seems a long way off. Injuries and availability makes ‘Mission Improbable’ more appropriate, especially for Saturday’s opener at Eden Park. A few factors, not least the phenomenal form of a certain 22-year-old, is nudging ‘Mission Impossible’ into play for the more cynical.Named on Monday in Steve Hansen’s 31-man squad for the three-match series, Malakai Fekitoa is likely to get a first taste of Test rugby this month. In terms of raw materials, he’s close to flawless – think Manu Tuilagi but half an inch taller and a touch more lithe, but still muscle-bound and bristling with pace and power. In terms of ability, he’s good enough to win 80 caps and patrol New Zealand’s midfield for the next decade.To offer some perspective, this is Fekitoa’s first Super Rugby campaign. He has played every second of the Highlanders’ 14 games since making an electric try-scoring debut back in February against the Blues, who let him go at the end of last season. That decision looks mighty misguided now. Here are the statistics to match the hyperbole.Over 1040 minutes, the centre has made 121 carries into contact, breaking 51 tackles. He has offloaded 16 times and sliced through for clean line breaks on another ten occasions. Among his six tries have been a couple of jaw-droppers, the pick of them probably a 60-metre stunner that left a quartet of Sharks defenders grasping at nothing.Defensively, Fekitoa offers typical Polynesian muscle – one hit on Hurricanes’ Conrad Smith was simply savage. However, he is also intelligent in a drift system. Instead of panicking, he stalks the inside shoulder of attackers and backs his speed to cut off any outside arcs.Before we get too carried away, there are rough edges to this diamond. An off-the-ball body-check  this weekend resulted in Ben Smith’s try for the Highlanders being disallowed. He could perhaps use his frame to better effect at the breakdown and a one-handed offload is not always the most accurate. That said, such criticism is seriously pernickety. Malakai Fekitoa is a new face in the All Blacks squad and big things are expected of the Highlanders centre. Here’s why…center_img New boy: Malakai Fekitoa during All Blacks training with Israel Dagg Nothing is guaranteed. Some say Nonu and Fekitoa are too similar to form a centre partnership and Smith’s experience is too important to cast aside. Put it this way though, England probably hope Hansen feels the same.Read a feature with Crusaders and All Blacks full-back Israel Dagg in the latest issue of Rugby World, on sale now.last_img read more

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The Clubhouse Podcast: The French foreign legion

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This opens up a conversation on the value of overseas rugby stars, not just in France but throughout the continent of Europe. Is the foreign influx good for European rugby? We put our views forward, discussing, among other things, the impact on shirt sales and attendances, the impact on younger talents, and the insidious nature of ‘academies’ in Fiji.Have a listen and let us know what you think. Is the European Champions Cup all the better for big names jetting in from the southern hemisphere? Will youngsters be hindered by a foreign old head blocking their path? There are plenty of views here… With the Top 14 final ending in the favour of Stade Francais – a 12-6 win over bad luck magnets Clermont Auvergne giving the Paris outfit the title – we thought we would talk through goings-on in France during the latest Clubhouse Podcast.Firstly we talk through that Top 14 final, all tense and close but also try-less and kick-heavy. That’s not to say it wasn’t a good final, and we talk through the good and the bad. Which leads us to comment on Stade’s squad, a squad that bucks the trend at top French sides by having ten starters who are French.last_img read more

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Five things we learnt in rugby – October

first_imgTest caps provide a long-term incomeNo-one can blame Rhys Webb for choosing to join Toulon next season. It is a once in a career opportunity to play with one of the best club teams in the world, with a collection of the finest talent, whilst earning a salary that we’re all envious of. However, Webb’s planned move abroad and the subsequent 60 Cap limit, or CAPS LOCK, imposed by the Welsh Rugby Union has poised a very interesting question for players and agents. Whilst the short-term gain of a few seasons in the Top 14 are obviously lucrative, the threat of not accumulating test caps has its risks long-term. Rugby, as yet, is not a profession that allows its retiring players to put their feet up.Tough call: The new 60-cap rule could make a huge dent in Rhys Webb’s future earningsUnlike football, where its elite players need not lift a finger after their playing days end, rugby’s wages do not offer that privilege. Even the current crop of big earners will still need an income after they retire; something in which test caps play a big role. You only need look at the lucrative after dinner circuit to see where the number of test caps literally translates into cash. British and Irish Lions and test cap centurions command significantly larger fees. A quick glance at the media landscape evidences where the big TV contracts and book deals land – 30 cap players don’t have nearly as much pulling power as 100 cap legends and they certainly don’t open as many supermarkets. Short term cash will always be a big draw for rugby players, particularly those with young families, but the long-term prospects must also be taken into account; and that is where test caps are worth their weight in platinum.The RFU demand help to protect their academy playersOne can only imagine how much coffee was spat on various union blazers as news spread around the world that the RFU was seeking help from World Rugby to prevent their players being poached. It was a statement that even Sean Spicer would have thought twice about issuing.A bit rich: The RFU going to World Rugby to stop other unions pinching their players received little sympathyYou don’t even need to pour through the inventory of young Welsh players at various private English colleges to understand the lunacy of the statement – just look at the current senior England squad and you’ll see players who’s ‘junior investment’ took place in another country. This isn’t to say that other unions don’t do the same, of course they do. However, when you’re the head poacher, at the Poacher’s Convention, celebrating 20 years of poaching, it’s probably not wise to play the poachers card. Plenty to ponder: Warren Gatland has a book out and he’s shooting from the hip Referees need less to doThe modern referees’ job has become a laughably difficult task. Rugby has essentially become a game of five separate functions with open play, the ruck, the maul, the scrum and the lineout becoming such unique disciplines that they hardly resemble the same elements that existed during the amateur era. The ruck and scrum have become some so tiresome in their interpretation that they almost qualify as separate sports within a sport – and thus now require a different approach to refereeing. It is unfair to expect the referee to oversee the whole operation.The impossible job: The game is now so complex that more help is needed for refereesFor example, it has become impossible for an individual to focus on the ruck and the offside line at the same time. Literally impossible. Short of embarking on a genetic breeding programme where we create four-eyed whistle blowers, asking a ref to look at two things simultaneously simply can’t be achieved. Offside decisions would be the sole responsibility of the assistant referees. And time keeping should be the sole responsibility of the TMO – why the referee is still in charge of the timing is bizarre, when the TMO can easily see when the game requires starting and stopping without the input of the referee. Rugby has undergone many changes since it turned professional, in particular with player roles becoming more specialised, and it is now time that the referee’s role underwent a similar evolution for their sake as much as the game’s. Gatland goes on a crash diet October was a lively month for Warren Gatland, even by his standards. He came out firing like a long lost member of NWA. First, he turned his pistol around gangsta style and took aim at the Kiwi press for trolling him during the British and Irish Lions’ tour, reloaded and took a shot at Sean O’Brien, then started blasting shells at Welsh supporters by stating that he had probably stayed in Wales too long and that a loyalty bonus was playing a big role in keeping him as head coach. But by far the most interesting aspect of Gatland’s October was his new Welsh squad. Particularly his selections at centre.Righting some wrongs: Warren Gatland has been outspoken on a variety of topicsGone were the crash ball centres of yesteryear and in came the ballers – Owen Watkin, Owen Williams and Hadleigh Parkes all represent very different options for Wales. What’s more intriguing is that Gatland didn’t even give himself the option of Jamie Roberts should the new passing plan go awry. It was like a well-upholstered lad going on a diet and not being able to have chocolate anywhere in the house. It would be all too easy for Gatland to have a craving late one night during the autumn internationals and go foraging into the cupboard for a lump of Jamie. If last month has been anything to go by, Gatland’s run in to the World Cup is going to be as wonderfully unpredictable as Steff Evans’ feet.England v Wales scrummaging and lineouts – let’s take it furtherThe revelation that Wales and England will take part in an organised session of scrums and line-outs represents a positive progression for rugby union and a degree of creative thinking on which the game should capitalise. It feels like a very NFL thing to do and the benefits extend beyond the coaching sphere. These new ‘mini games’ would provide an ideal opportunity for livestreaming and possibly another income stream. An income stream which makes far more sense than extending the season.Full bore: The England v Wales training session should be a lively affairInstead of making the players play more, why can’t we simply make more use of the things that players are already doing – such as training. The streaming of these events would also allow for some more in-depth analysis of the modern scrum and lineout – something which is difficult to achieve during the complicated dynamics of an 80-minute game. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gatland’s grenades are back, the tough life of a referee, inter-nation training, long-term earnings and the RFU’s controversial plea are all coveredlast_img read more

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Get to know Fiji’s Peceli Yato

first_img“My dad really wanted me to 
go to school, so I could help my family. So I would come down to the college, then I went to town, took off my uniform and changed my clothes so I could go to training. I would play rugby, come back again, put on my uniform and go back home and my dad didn’t even know I was playing rugby. I was 17 by that time.”The rest, as they say, is a history of opponents strewn in his wake.Pacific rivals: Facing Tonga in Auckland (Getty Images)Of course, fans of the Flying Fijians and more than a handful of neutrals will hope the industrious back-rower will be equally as robust in the upcoming Rugby World Cup, hammering into Pool D.Yato has taken note of some journalists proclaiming that this time Fiji can wreak real havoc, but the breakaway offers a serious caveat, saying: “If the team want to do that kind of damage it’s all in the mindset.” He believes it is time to fulfil some undoubted potential and to sharpen the work in each of Fiji’s team units.Going on, he says: “It’s true we have an exciting back row. But like I said, it’s about how prepared we are and if we have good communication as a back row, 
we will make work easier for the others. So we have to work on our fitness, we have to work on our game plan. Because the team rely on us – the back row is going to be the ones who take control, who are looking for the ball.“The result will be good for us 
if the back row do our job.”There is one team Yato would love to get in his crosshairs should he take the field against them in Japan: above all others, he wants to beat the Wallabies.He has lost to them before but more than that, he says, he wants to make history. The irony is that after the season he has had and the more settled Yato feels, the more nervous established sides 
like Australia must feel. Strike a pose: Yato on the poses for a portrait (Getty Images) This feature first appeared in the September edition of Rugby World.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, and Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. With A year still 
to go on Peceli Yato’s contract, and the player himself saying 
“I really want to stay – it’s like home”, it wasn’t exactly panic stations for Clermont. But when the back-row recently signed a new deal with the club until 2023, the rest of the Top 14 must have had to pardon their French.Quite simply, the Fiji back-row has become one of the most imposing figures in France, racking up vast yardage with ball in hand and bullying attackers.Yato talks freely of the support and love he has felt from the folk of the Auvergne, of how he adores his life there, and certainly there is a sense that he is at one with the famous side now. Yet it was not an instantaneous rise to Top 14 dominance for the Sigatoka lad.An émigré as a teenager, Yato had to work through the initially tough settling-in period in a foreign country, sometimes relying on the help of kids a few years younger than him. He explains as much after adroitly handling a compliment chucked at him about juggling languages.“Seriously, my French is better than my English right now!” says Yato with a laugh. “It’s been seven years for me now in France and it was 12 years of learning English in Fiji. I came to France at 18 and 
I couldn’t speak any French. But my family back home speak Fijian at all times, so I didn’t get much chance to speak English.Fired up: Playing in the knock-outs of the Challenge Cup (INPHO)“Moving was kind of weird, first of all because of the language. I didn’t really understand anything, I didn’t even know what was going on in training. Luckily there were a few students there in 
the espoirs (youth section) who usually helped me with my French. I had to socialise with them a lot and learnt casual French – not proper French. I also took a class which really helped.”Much has been discussed about the ethics of foreign powers setting up shop in the Pacific region and establishing rugby academies. Yet, whatever your view of these practices, Yato 
was drawn across to a new life 
in Europe and is appreciative 
of the opportunity. He had to learn quickly before this was a possibility, mind you. He only began taking the game seriously at 17, but Yato credits Fiji-based French coach Franck Boivert for recognising his talent and quickly dragging him up to the standard that ultimately earned him a move.Not that Yato was always set on life as a sportsman. He had other plans – and even initially hid his athletic exploits – before it was decided that a sojourn with rugby was best for him and his family.“I really wanted to become a soldier,” Yato levels with us. “It wasn’t a good idea for me to do that, my dad wanted me to play rugby (when the time came to make a decision). I’m not sure why, maybe he was afraid I would get killed somewhere, so I would get out playing rugby instead.“I’m still a big fan of soldiers. My father is a farmer and I grew up on a farm back in Sigatoka.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Fijian force on making a name for himself in France and the Rugby World Cup mindset. This feature first appeared in the September edition of Rugby World.last_img read more

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Pakistan bishops condemn attack on church compound

first_img Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Pakistan bishops condemn attack on church compound An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET September 22, 2012 at 12:05 am Dialogue between Christian and Muslim would not bear fruits unless Muslim leaders speak out and condemn publicly against those who terrorize Christians in a Muslim majority country. All Bishops around the world should also condemn along with Pakistani bishops for such terrorist acts as they did for anti-Islam video. There cannot be any justification for burning Churches and killing American Ambassador. Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Posted Sep 21, 2012 Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Asia Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Julian Malakar says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY [Anglican Communion News Service] Thousands of people Sept. 21 broke into a church compound in Pakistan, burnt down the church, and destroyed the homes of two priests and the school headteacher.The motivation behind the attack in Mardan, near Peshawar, is not yet clear, but the school was looted with newly installed computers being stolen and the building was set alight. No-one is reported to have been injured in the attack.The Bishop of Peshawar Humphrey Peters has appealed for support from the Anglican Communion: “The damage has been very severe, and we will need to rebuild. We are asking for people around the world to keep us in your prayers.”The moderator of the Church of Pakistan, the Most Rev. Samuel Robert Azariah, condemned the attack: “This news is very damaging to relations between the communities in Pakistan and around the world.“The government and faith leaders in Pakistan have a role to play in educating people that they have the right to protest, but to damage property and terrify people in this way is completely wrong. The government and faith leaders should provide the lead in preventing attacks.”The Diocese of Peshawar, where the attack took place, provides education and health services to the local community – Muslim and Christian alike – and provided substantial support to victims of floods and a major earthquake in recent years, regardless of their religious affiliation. Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

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Episcopal-supported intentional community in Charlottesville embodies radical discipleship — and…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags August 18, 2017 at 4:34 pm Radical Marxist indoctrination in action. It is time for this artificial, socialist worldview to be rejected by the church. History shows clearly where this tragic ideological road leads. Wake up! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 21, 2017 at 12:38 pm Amen Dr. Flint! Rector Knoxville, TN Pjcabbiness says: August 18, 2017 at 8:16 pm I’m with PJcabbiness. No doubt many of these people sincerely believe in what they are doing. Truth of the matter, however, is that they are enormously naïve in their understanding of human nature and extremely arrogant in not realizing that. Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 22, 2017 at 2:20 pm Free and open discussion is always good.I do hope you continue to stay in the Episcopal Church and not allow differences to make you feel unappreciated. All religious organizations are struggling to come to terms with the rapid progress that society has made in technology, medicine, understanding of Scriptures based on new historical findings, etc. etc. This has been a cause of discomfort.I have found that you can be a part of the Episcopal Church and yet maintain your “individual identity”. That is the beauty of this church. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Pamela Payne says: August 18, 2017 at 5:39 pm PJ, your crabbyness is very concerning. I worry that you see communists under every bed and around every corner. I pray that you will call upon Jesus and examine your heart, so that His Love and Blessings will fill your life and relieve your fears. Blessings to you. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Jawaharlal Prasad says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Pjcabbiness says: William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Episcopal-supported intentional community in Charlottesville embodies radical discipleship — and permaculture Not a commune exactly, but these young people do a lot of sharing and caring Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 18, 2017 at 6:35 pm I am an Episcopal priest in the Charlottesville area, and I know this community and these young people. I am thrilled to see this community thriving and expanding their vision for ministry. August 21, 2017 at 10:58 am I very well may follow you. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Environment & Climate Change August 22, 2017 at 2:04 pm “And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question! This would be true for other nationalities also. History is written by the victors and the history taught in classroom are incomplete or may not be factual.How many of us had heard of Katherine Johnson, African-American physicist and mathematician whose work was critical to the success of the US space program?Many German Christians supported Hitler and what he stood for. If I am not mistaken, the Catholic priest who gave money to Hitler to start his political group eventually became the Pope.Media needs to do its part. Curate Diocese of Nebraska William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: William A Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Donald Heacock says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 18, 2017 at 8:28 pm I applaud their Community . Their idealism & service. I am puzzled by their dislike of Capitalism? They seem to be getting educations & jobs they seem to seek. Sadly some always fall through the safety net. I suspect the laND & buildings were probably are a gift of of a well to do family. Many Episcopal Churchs also have been built from well to do business people. Maybe they should reread Orwell’s 1984. Rector Albany, NY August 20, 2017 at 10:34 am Yes, Orwell’s 1984 is here and so is Bradbury’s 451 Fahrenheit. My family and I are done with the Episcopal Church. We have been patient, but it’s time to move on. Submit an Event Listing August 20, 2017 at 7:00 pm How did Hitler change Germany from a democracy to a Nazi dictatorship and then reinforce this? For those who do not know history it would be impossible for them to answer this question. Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question.One only need look at the move afoot in The United States of America to remove Confederate statues from public venues to see the seed planted. The divisive media and progressive agenda to assign blame for all the ills of this country to a particular group of people comes right out of the Nazi Playbook. Hitler was a Socialist Liberal: “We are socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are determined to destroy this system under all conditions.” Adolf Hitler, May 1, 1927. A favorite tactic employed by the progressive agenda and media is to describe the Nazis as “right wing” with Adolf Hitler as their leader. Rewriting history is pretty common for progressives. One example is the American KKK was actually founded by Democrats. This is why patriotic Americans of all races, creeds, origins, sexual status and any other label progressives have designed to divide us, need to stand up and oppose this effort to CHANGE OUR COMMON HISTORY.The Nazis started by confusing the issues, usurping truth for lies, misinformation in the news media, assigning blame for all the ills of society to one specific group (which later would be expanded to multiple groups), and ultimately a change in the German Constitution. If this sounds familiar it is because Americans are experiencing this in their own country now.This is why it is important to learn and know history, not change it or try to erase it, but learn it. When those of us in religious life took an oath to NEVER AGAIN let this happen, we were serious. One may think it is vogue to be identified as a Progressive in America today. Remember, it was just a vogue to be identified as a Nazi Party member in Germany of yesterday.Know History! Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Neff Powell says: Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Jon Spangler says: Dan Tootle says: Submit a Press Release August 18, 2017 at 4:48 pm Yes, we know where this leads. . . to the Kingdom of God! Humankind did not get this right the first time, so we now have another opportunity to live into what Jesus and his Followers exampled for us. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 18, 2017 at 4:43 pm Perhaps Pjcabbines should re-read Acts 2:42-47, which preceded Marx and Engels by at least 1600 years and is referred to directly in the article? Here it is:“And they continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers. 43 Then fear came upon every soul, and many wonders and signs were done through the apostles. 44 Now all who believed were together, and had all things in common, 45 and sold their possessions and goods, and divided them among all, as anyone had need.46 So continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, they ate their food with gladness and simplicity of heart, 47 praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to the church[h] daily those who were being saved.” This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, August 21, 2017 at 10:59 am How did Hitler change Germany from a democracy to a Nazi dictatorship and then reinforce this? For those who do not know history it would be impossible for them to answer this question. Most Americans and even Germans living today could not answer this question.One only need look at the move afoot in The United States of America to remove Confederate statues from public venues to see the seed planted. The divisive media and progressive agenda to assign blame for all the ills of this country to a particular group of people comes right out of the Nazi Playbook. Hitler was a Socialist Liberal: “We are socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are determined to destroy this system under all conditions.” Adolf Hitler, May 1, 1927. A favorite tactic employed by the progressive agenda and media is to describe the Nazis as “right wing” with Adolf Hitler as their leader. Rewriting history is pretty common for progressives. One example is the American KKK was actually founded by Democrats. This is why patriotic Americans of all races, creeds, origins, sexual status and any other label progressives have designed to divide us, need to stand up and oppose this effort to CHANGE OUR COMMON HISTORY.The Nazis started by confusing the issues, usurping truth for lies, misinformation in the news media, assigning blame for all the ills of society to one specific group (which later would be expanded to multiple groups), and ultimately a change in the German Constitution. If this sounds familiar it is because Americans are experiencing this in their own country now.This is why it is important to learn and know history, not change it or try to erase it, but learn it. When those of us in religious life took an oath to NEVER AGAIN let this happen, we were serious. One may think it is vogue to be identified as a Progressive in America today. Remember, it was just a vogue to be identified as a Nazi Party member in Germany of yesterday.Know History! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Grace Cangialosi says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Jawaharlal Prasad says: August 21, 2017 at 7:33 pm I am impressed and inspired by this wonderful story. By Amy SowderPosted Aug 18, 2017 Submit a Job Listing Comments (15) Press Release Service Charlottesville, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Sarah Rachel says: Claire Hitchins tends the food garden that supplements the diet of those living at the Charis Intentional Community, a mission of Grace Church, Red Hill, southwest of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] In the 95-degree heat, a young, bearded white man wearing a hat with a “Black Lives Matter” pin sprawls on a lawn chair past the graveled driveway of the house nestled in a valley off Monacan Trail Road southwest of Charlottesville, Virginia. A rainbow of origami cranes strung together like garland hovers between two posts behind him. When a visitor approaches, he stretches as he gets up and leads her through the front door, where young people huddle in a colorful living room packed with books and art.Within the hour, the house and lawn will fill with more than 30 people, bringing chatter, singing, children’s laughter, a strumming banjo and serious conversations — along with the salads, enchiladas, quiches and cookies of a casual summer potluck party.This is home base for the Charis Community. Pronounced kaar-is, Charis means “grace” in ancient Greek.Cofounded in 2015 by Episcopal youth leader Grace Aheron and the Rev. Neal Halvorson-Taylor of Grace Church, Red Hill, the Charis Community is a gathering of people living together under the shared values of simplicity, prayer and hospitality. This intentional Christian community is housed at an unused Episcopal Church property. The eight acres owned by the Diocese of Virginia include a small cobblestone church, a ranch-style house, a food garden and a forest of tulip poplars and dogwoods. The Charis Community is a partnership with Grace Church, a nearby mission parish. This Charis mission is supported by the church’s vestry, and members keep in contact with Halvorson-Taylor weekly on an informal basis.The Charis Community idea formed through a connection followed by discussions and prayer. Halvorson-Taylor is married to Aheron’s Hebrew professor at the University of Virginia, and they got in touch a year after Aheron graduated and was living in San Francisco. Halvorson-Taylor knew of this property no one was using.“I felt like God was calling me to go and do this in Charlottesville. It took me a long time to figure that out. We were in conversations for months,” Aheron said.Trusting in the transformation of the spirit, the young adults living at Charis are discerning their vocational call, sitting in the tensions of injustice and inviting others into the journey.Charis cofounder Grace Aheron and partner Rowan Hollins chat at the potluck party in front of the garland of origami cranes created in support for people of color, hanging outside the intentional community’s home south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News Service“We understand that all of what we do is interconnected, from the radical activism to the ecological,” said Claire Hitchins, 26, a musician and one of the five long-term residents.These young adults share an explicit passion “to respond to our context of empire, capitalism, and alienation, along with the environmental and social destruction that those forces perpetuate,” according to the community’s official mission statement. They want to model Jesus’ vision of community, resist society’s violence and accompany each other on their individual journeys of discipleship and growth.An intentional community can take many forms, but it always involves a group of people living together with a clear mission. While a commune usually means all individual resources are pooled and shared, other intentional communities share only some of their resources.Charis housemates share chores posted on the refrigerator, including gardening, tending chickens and bees and general household upkeep. They contribute monthly to a fund for the house’s food and supplies, and they maintain an account at a credit union for house bills. Once or twice a week, they join for a morning prayer, also considered an open-faith meditation. There’s no discrimination based on religion, color, culture, race, ancestry, sexual orientation, disability, gender or gender expression. And they dine together at a weekly community meal, where they have a meeting to address projects — some ecological, others outreach-based.A monastery is yet another type of intentional community. Monasteries are cloistered from the outside world to varying degrees and require members to take religious vows. But many kinds of intentional communities don’t fall along these lines. The Episcopal Service Corps helps develop and support a network of 26 intentional communities from Hawaii to New Hampshire, united by shared values of service, justice and prayer. Charis isn’t listed under this network but resembles this style.Located on land where the Monacan Indian Nation lived centuries earlier, according to the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, the Charis Community comprises people in their 20s and early 30s who are devoted to radical discipleship. They share a belief in the importance of hospitality, outreach and permaculture.Hospitality within and beyondThe friendly, generous reception of visitors to the Charis home is a Christian act, and it’s something members take seriously. This place is a refuge for people in need of moral support, safety from tenuous living situations and hope for a better future.Friends, parishioners and fellow activists gather at the Charis Community home south of Charlottesville, Virginia, for a monthly potluck party. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServicePeople flock to their monthly potlucks, where it’s tradition to start the meal with a song. David Slezak, 70, arrived at the July potluck bearing his organic beef cabbage rolls, a family recipe. Slezak is a parishioner and singer at St. Paul’s Memorial Church at the University of Virginia and manager of Haven Kitchen, a homeless shelter kitchen. He also attended the Charis sunrise Easter service and brunch, along with about 75 other people.He’s inspired by Aheron’s leadership and energy. “She’s an Episcopal powerhouse,” he said. “I’ve been just so moved by Grace and her work.”Short-term residential guests at Charis may be experiencing housing insecurity because they can’t afford market-rate rentals, they recently arrived in the Charlottesville community, were released from the hospital or from prison, and or their family is in transition from divorce, domestic violence or ending foster care.Charis housemates Rowan Hollins and Mark Heisey relax at the monthly potluck party outside the house where the Christian intentional community resides south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServiceThey could be anyone from single parents with low-wage jobs who experience a crisis to former refugees whose formal support has ended, said Mark Heisey, 29, the bearded guy from the front lawn, as he, Aheron and Hitchins gave a tour of the house.Hospitality plays a role in a larger sense too — especially considering the violence and upheaval in the larger Charlottesville community after the summer’s white supremacy rallies protesting the removal of Confederate statues.“We want to help Charlottesville become more hospitable to people for whom conditions have become inhospitable,” said Ann Marie Smith, a Buddhist-Christian and member of Grace Church who attended the potluck. She leads weekly meditation sessions in the Charis living room.Outreach in times of peace and troubleThe property can feel like a secluded haven where tomato leaves rustle and crickets sing. But the swoosh of Route 29 traffic and the clunky hum of the parallel-running Amtrak train just beyond are tangible reminders that the outside is always near.Most of the Charis residents have outside jobs to go to during the day. Maria Niechwiadowicz, 25, is a Charis resident who works as a program coordinator for Bread & Roses, a nutritional outreach ministry of Trinity Episcopal Church in Charlottesville. “I think we all went into this thinking permaculture would be our thing, but with the changing political landscape, we found racial justice and hospitality, which means inviting people here so conversations can happen in a deeper sense, and for people to feel safe,” Niechwiadowicz said.A University of Virginia graduate in religious studies, youth minister and program manager at Restoration Village Arts in Charlottesville, Aheron, 26, has worked for social, environmental, racial and women’s causes on her own and through the Episcopal Church. For instance, she was on the Episcopal Church’s delegation to the 2015 meeting of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. She participated in an eco-justice panel discussion at a Diocese of California event in San Francisco in her role as a member of Cultivate: The Episcopal Food Movement. She was also an adult member of the 2017 Episcopal Youth Event Mission Planning Team.Aheron and the other Charis members joined counter-protesters at the July 8 Ku Klux Klan rally and at the Aug. 11 and 12 white supremacy rallies in downtown Charlottesville.Tension was already thick after the July rally, before the more extreme violence of the second rally. Hours before the potluck, Charis members were still reeling from the first protest, the police reaction to it and all the implications.A rainbow garland, created in support for people of color during the summer’s white supremacy rallies, is made of origami cranes, each of which contains a message, such as this one: “Don’t hurt my friends.” For a potluck party, the garland hung outside the Charis house, an intentional community south of Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News Service“Police tear-gassed people, and we were downwind of it, wiping our eyes. It’s a very emotional time right now,” Aheron said as she and other Charis housemates gathered in the living room anchored by a velvety silver couch and matching chair. A megaphone sat atop a piano. Three counter-protest signs leaned against the fireplace. Each of the small paper cranes on the garland outside had written intentions to eradicate white supremacy in Charlottesville. One message peeked out from pink paper crane: “Don’t hurt my friends!”Then, at the Aug. 12 rally, one young woman was killed and 19 people injured when a man associated with white supremacy groups plowed his car into counter-protestors. No one from Charis was injured, but Aheron and Charis guest Rowan Hollins were standing on the corner of the street where the attack happened.White supremacists have since protested by the vigils and memorial services, and Heisey has helped with security, Aheron said.“Everyone’s physically fine, but not emotionally. We’re pretty traumatized,” said Aheron, who had a dream that a white supremacist drove into her mother’s house. “No one in Charlottesville has been able to get rest. It’s not over, by any means.”Smith, 48, doesn’t live at Charis, but she’s there often as part of the larger community participating in outreach. “These guys are putting themselves on the front line of this, all in Christian discipleship, so I accompany them and help provide a meditative grounded space,” Smith said.A permaculture of many layersCharis had quieter beginnings and practices, namely, permaculture as a guiding principle. For many, permaculture means closed systems of production, efficiency and high-intensity homesteading. Charis wants to apply these principles plus more.Permaculture in general focuses on letting the land speak for itself. Rather than simply extracting products from a space of land, Charis members pay attention to the soil composition, needs of the plants and natural curvature of the land, which is assessed for best use. In their permaculture, the land has so much more to say, and that land carries memory. They call it “listening permaculture.”“You usually hear this whitewashed, like a homestead Disneyland,” Aheron said. “But a lot of what we learned in growing processes came from indigenous people.”Martha Morris, 30, has lived in the Charis community off-and-on since it began. After earning her graduate degree in urban and environmental planning, she became a stewardship assistant at the Virginia Outdoors Association. “I do like the land-based part of it, and that’s part of what drew me here,” Morris said about the community. “It fits into the larger philosophy of Charis, including outreach activities.”Charis cofounder Grace Aheron tends bees for honey farming, a sustainable practice that’s part of the permaculture values of this intentional community on Episcopal land. Photo: Eze Amos/For Episcopal News ServiceFor this community, that respect for the land means a plan to replace the lawn with a forest garden that will help them be as food self-sufficient as possible. Also called a food forest, a forest garden is a key part of permaculture. It’s a sustainable garden designed to produce the beneficial relationships that a natural plant-and-animal community has in that climate.Morris is excited about what they can do: nurture indigenous, perennial plants including medicinal plants, herbs and fruit trees. They already have a garden yielding all sorts of produce: strawberries, Anaheim peppers, basil, large red tomatoes, little yellow pear tomatoes, Roma tomatoes, summer squash, parsley, prickly cucumbers, and summer squash. They have two beehives, and they’d also like to create a flower garden to serve the church’s cemetery.In the basement, about a dozen 10-day-old fluffy heritage chicks hopped and pecked about in their wooden pen, warmed by a red light. These chicks aren’t fancy heritage breeds. “It’s about preserving the tradition of well-bred, healthy, old lines of animals, chickens not bred to get huge, lay tons of eggs and die young,” she said.Behind the house, Heisey pointed to the ChickShaw, or mobile chicken coop, he built from wood and wire after the last flock was plucked off by predators. “Having chickens in one spot for only a limited time has an ecological benefit,” Heisey said. “By moving them regularly, they’ll have grubs to eat and fortify the soil.”Other valuesIntegrated with permaculture are the values of simplicity, resilience, sustainable cultivation, responsible revenue generation, closed-loop systems and homesteading.Composting is an easy example of a closed-looped system, using food waste to fertilize their food garden — instead of disposing of it. Worms found in compost are integral to the process.“Worm poop is super good for nutrients, which is good for the soil,” Hitchins said as she riffled through the compost with gloved hands to expose the wrigglers. It’s a natural, and some say superior, alternative to store-bought fertilizer for gardening.To some, living in this kind of community can seem idealistic. But it’s living with a deep awareness of the history of the earth and its people, in the spirit of Jesus’ teachings, Aheron said. That awareness transforms into action. And that action can have benefits expanding beyond these eight acres.As the potluck party-goers tossed a Frisbee on the front lawn where lightning bugs pulsed in the darkening sky, Hitchins sat at the piano inside the house with a friend, creating a song:“We are more than conquerors/If we only believe another world is possible/Victory is in our eyes/I’m gonna stay on the battlefield until the day I die.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a Brooklyn, New York-based freelance writer. Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

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