Author: admin

AWOL Marine charged with grandmother’s murder, sheriff says

first_imgHalifax County Sheriff’s Office(ROCKY MOUNT, N.C.) — An 18-year-old Marine who allegedly went AWOL is accused of killing his grandmother, according to North Carolina officials.Sally Copeland Evans, 74, was reported missing on Thursday after family members said they hadn’t seen her for several days, the sheriff’s office in Halifax County, North Carolina, said.The last one to see Evans was her 18-year-old Marine grandson, Isaiah Kahleal Evans Caeser. Caeser, stationed at Fort Benning in Georgia, had been absent without leave since April 2 and was wanted for desertion, the sheriff’s office said.According to family, Evans was trying to convince her grandson to go back to the military, the sheriff’s office said.Authorities found Caeser at a hotel in the Rocky Mount, North Carolina, area. He allegedly used his grandmother’s credit card to buy a room, the sheriff’s office said.Explosive material was found in the room, and the hotel was evacuated, the sheriff’s office said. No bomb was found.Caeser was taken into custody, charged with the murder of his grandmother and served with a fugitive warrant for desertion, the sheriff’s office said. He is set to appear in court on May 16.The sheriff’s office said his grandmother was found dead at an undisclosed location near Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, which is about 45 miles away from Rocky Mount.A spokesperson for Fort Benning did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.Anyone with information is asked to call the Rocky Mount Police Department at 252-972-1411. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

‘Hateful’ woman threatened to call police on 8-year-old for selling water, mom says

first_imgABCNews.com(SAN FRANCISCO) — A San Francisco mom says she was “shocked” when her neighbor threatened to call the police on her 8-year-old daughter for selling bottled water without a permit over the weekend.The story went viral on Saturday after Erin Austin filmed the exchange with her neighbor, later identified as Alison Ettel, because she feared the situation might be racially motivated. Her daughter, Jordan, is biracial and Ettel is white.“Calling the police on any person of color these days is an issue. They come, they shoot first and they ask questions later,” Austin told “Good Morning America.” “Knowing that and knowing everything that’s going on in the media, why would you call the police on a child of color?”The video received thousands of comments and shares on social media, as users accused the woman, dubbed “Permit Patty,” of racism. People were quick to compare the situation to an April incident in Oakland, where a white woman called the police on a black family barbecuing in a park.Jordan, who was selling the water to raise money for a trip to Disneyland, said she “never thought” she would make any of her neighbors upset when she set up her water cooler outside.She said she had only been set up for about 15 minutes when the woman approached her, “saying she was trying to work and we were being too loud.”“I did not want to see the police because I was scared,” Jordan told GMA. “I just went … to my mom, and my mom just dealt with it.”She said the incident changed the way she views her neighbor.“Now I’m starting to think she did it on purpose,” Jordan said, “because I think she doesn’t care about people’s skin colors, because she doesn’t care about people’s lives except for hers.”Ettel, who said she’s been getting death threats since the video was posted, denied accusations of racism.“I have no problem with enterprising young women. I want to support that little girl. It was all the mother and just about being quiet,” Ettel told the Huffington Post on Saturday. “I had been putting up with this for hours, and I just snapped.”She said she only “pretended” to call the police.“I completely regret that I handled that so poorly,” Ettel said. “It was completely stress related, and I should have never confronted her. That was a mistake, a complete mistake.”Austin denied the woman’s claims that she or her daughter were being loud.“I know in her interview she said it was stress related, but that’s not an excuse,” Austin said. “People lose it, but you don’t lose it on children. There’s no excuse for what she did.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Utah mayor’s widow: ‘Fitting’ that remains of husband killed in Afghanistan returned to US on Election Day

first_imgFacebook/Brent Taylor(NORTH OGDEN, Utah) — The widow of Maj. Brent Taylor said Tuesday that it was “fitting” that the remains of her slain husband were returned to the United States on Election Day. Taylor, a Utah National Guardsman who was also the mayor of North Ogden, Utah, was slain in an insider attack in Afghanistan this past weekend.In his final Facebook posting a week ago Taylor had encouraged everyone to vote and offered a reminder “that we have far more as Americans that unites us than divides us.” Taylor’s remains were returned to Dover Air Force Base early Tuesday morning.An Army honor guard carried the flag-draped transfer case containing his remains from a civilian transport plane into a transfer vehicle. Top Army and National Guard officials were on hand to support Taylor’s widow and the two oldest of their seven children. “I personally cannot find words adequate to tell you all that I feel as I stand here this morning by the dawn’s early light,” Jenny Taylor later told reporters. “And so I echo the words someone recently shared with me, Brent may have died on Afghan soil but he died for the success of freedom and democracy in both of our countries.”“It seems only fitting that Brent who in death now represents so much more than anything, something so much greater than any of our own individual lives, has come home to U.S. soil in a flag-draped casket on our election day,” she said.“It is timeless and cherished honor to serve in our country’s armed services. That honor has been Brent’s has he served in the Utah National Guard for the past 15 years. And it has been mine just as long as I have proudly stood by his side.” She said she shared her husband’s “timeless and cherished honor to serve in our country’s armed services.”“And it has been and will continue to be the great honor of our seven children for the rest of their lives and I pray for many generations to come,” she said.“The price of freedom sure does feel incredibly high to all those of us who know and love our individual soldier,” said Taylor. “But the value of freedom is immeasurable to all who know and love America and all that she represents.”She recalled his final Facebook post from October 28 where he urged friends to vote and offered a reminder that “we have far more as Americans that unites us than divides us.”“As the USA gets ready to vote in our own election next week, I hope everyone back home exercises their precious right to vote. And that whether the Republicans or the Democrats win, that we all remember that we have far more as Americans that unites us than divides us. “United we stand, divided we fall.” God Bless America,” he wrote. Taylor was on his fourth deployment overseas, his second to Afghanistan, when he was shot and killed on Sunday in an insider attack carried out by a member of the Afghan security services. The attacker was killed by other Afghan forces.One other American service member who was wounded in the attack is currently undergoing medical treatment but in stable condition, according to a NATO statement.Taylor was elected mayor of North Ogden in 2013 after serving on the City Council since 2009. He held a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Brigham Young University and a Master of Public Administration from the University of Utah, according to the North Ogden city website. He was a current Ph.D. candidate at the University of Utah in International Relations.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

YouTube star arrested for allegedly abusing seven adoptive children

first_imgv777999/iStock(MARICOPA, Ariz.) — A YouTube star is accused of physically abusing her seven adoptive children, who told authorities they were pepper-sprayed, beaten and deprived of food and water if they didn’t participate in her videos.Machelle Hobson, 48, whose YouTube channel “Fantastic Adventures” has garnered almost 800,000 subscribers and 250 million views since 2012, was arrested last Friday following a welfare check at her home in Maricopa, Arizona, about 35 miles south of downtown Phoenix, according to the complaint filed in Pinal County Superior Court.A 19-year-old woman told the Maricopa Police Department on March 13 that her younger adoptive stepsister disclosed being abused by her mother, Hobson.Officers then conducted a welfare check at Hobson’s residence, where they found seven children “who appeared to be malnourished, due to their pale completion, dark rings under their eyes, underweight, and they stated they were thirsty and hungry,” according to the probable cause statement.All seven children were removed from Hobson’s custody.Police interviewed two of the children and attempted to speak with a third but “she was visibly nervous, shaking, and it appeared she was too scared to answer any questions,” according to the probable cause statement. The four other children were not questioned.One child told police Hobson locked her in a closet for days at a time without food or water and made her wear a pull-up diaper, not allowing her to use the bathroom.The child alleged her adoptive mother would spray her and her six siblings with pepper spray, spank them and force them to take ice baths. She allegedly would further punish them if they resisted, according to the complaint.The child told police she was once pepper-sprayed between her legs and was in pain for several days.Another child told police, “I either get beat with a hanger or belt,” “or a brush,” “or get pepper-sprayed from head to toe,” according to the probable cause statement. He also alleged Hobson would grab his “privates” and, on numerous occasions, pinched him with her fingernails until he bled.Hobson denied the allegations, saying the only forms of punishment she uses are grounding, spanking and making the kids stand in the corner, according to the complaint.All of the kids mentioned having to partake in their mother’s YouTube series, which featured the adopted children in different scenarios, according to the complaint. The kids told police they were punished if they forgot their lines or didn’t follow Hobson’s directions.“This is one of the reasons their mom took them out of school, so they can keep filming their series and they mentioned they have not been in school for years,” the probable cause statement reads.The YouTube channel was still up on the video-sharing site as of Wednesday morning but later appeared to be taken down. YouTube will terminate accounts upon discovery of repeated violations of its community guidelines.“We work closely with leading child safety organizations and others in our industry to protect young people. When we’re made aware of serious allegations of this nature we investigate and take action,” a YouTube spokesperson told ABC News in a statement Thursday morning. “We immediately suspended monetization when notified of the arrest. In cases where there are Community Guidelines violations, we may take additional actions, including terminating the channel.”The Pinal County Attorney’s Office called the allegations “highly disturbing and alarming.”“Children are our community’s most precious resource, and this office is committed to holding those individuals who choose to harm them fully accountable for their actions,” Pinal County Attorney Kent Volkmer said in a statement Wednesday afternoon.Hobson and her two adult sons, Logan and Ryan Hackney, were taken into custody by local law enforcement at their residence on March 15, according to the complaint.Logan Hackney allegedly admitted to police that the children would be locked in the closet for long periods of time as punishment and that he had knowledge of the alleged pepper spray and ice baths. He also told police he observed physical injuries on the kids and heard them scream and cry, according to the complaint.Logan Hackney claimed he had a discussion with his brother about reporting the child abuse, and the children told police Ryan Hackney would sneak them food when they were locked in the closet.Hobson and her two sons had their initial court appearance on Saturday. Hobson’s bond was set at $200,000 secured and she remains in custody, according to the Pinal County Attorney’s Office. She was booked on two counts of child molestation, seven counts of child abuse, five counts of unlawful imprisonment and five counts of child neglect.Hobson has a preliminary hearing scheduled for March 26. The attorney appointed to Hobson did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment Thursday morning.Hobson’s last name was listed as “Hackney” in the initial complaint by the Pinal County Attorney’s Office, which later changed it.Logan and Ryan Hackney, Hobson’s biological children, were booked into Pinal County Jail on seven counts each of failing to report child abuse. They were released on their own recognizance on Tuesday and are due back in court April 8.Logan and Ryan Hackney have hired a private attorney, who did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment Thursday morning.Zeb and Tawny Schnorr, a couple in Scottsdale, Arizona, run their own YouTube channel starring their 10-year-old and 6-year-old sons called “Extreme Toys TV,” which has amassed over 4.1 million subscribers and over 2.1 million views since 2015.The Schnorrs told ABC News they have never met Hobson but her two adult sons contacted them about a year ago for help with filming and editing content. And just a few weeks ago, Logan and Ryan Hackney brought over Hobson’s seven adoptive children to the couple’s house to film a collaboration.The Schnorrs told ABC News they didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary with the seven children, who appeared to be well-behaved and playing normally with their two kids. The parents said they were shocked to learn of the allegations.“I just wish that there was something I would’ve seen,” Tawny Schnorr told ABC News in an interview Wednesday. “I was one-on-one with these kids, and there was no sign they were in danger.”“I had those kids in my house, twice they were here, and I just feel like it was my responsibility as a mom to help them and I feel like I could’ve saved them,” she added, in between tears. “The things those kids had gone through and were going through, my heart breaks for them because nobody deserves that.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

UNCC instructor who escaped school shooting says students were ‘running for their lives’

first_imgSean Rayford/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — A professor whose class was the site of the deadly school shooting at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte is giving his account of “what actually went down inside the room.”As students in Adam Johnson’s anthropology class were giving their final presentations last month, a former student who had previously been enrolled in the course opened fire.Johnson penned an essay about the experience, which was shared on the department’s website. Johnson wrote that he wanted to document the events and clear up any misinformation.He said the shooting took place in the early evening of April 30, when one group was showing a video about static versus dynamic universe.“We get about seven minutes into the video and without warning, earsplitting bangs ring throughout the room, off the glass walls, creating a terrible reverberation,” Johnson wrote.He then detailed the confusion that erupted and how he kicked his chair and ushered students in the direction of the classroom doors.“I make it to the door, out the door and hold it open for the rushing students. One student falls down in the door way and is stepped on, I pick them up and move them back with the flow of traffic,” he wrote.Johnson described the mayhem outside of the classroom.“The students are scattering and running for their lives, in all directions,” he said.Johnson said he and a few students ran to his office in the anthropology department, where the chair of the department called 911. They waited for “what seemed like forever” until campus police arrived, announcing the all clear, he said.He detailed the hours that immediately followed, when he spoke to police and was met by his partner to pick up his car from campus before going to a nearby friends’ house for dinner.“My emotions are currently high and I am absolutely heartbroken. My students are incredibly special to me and I try to make that known throughout the semester,” he wrote.Johnson did not identify anyone in the essay, including the student who “tackled the shooter and undoubtedly saved more lives.”As for the shooter, “we should not glorify him as it contributes to this kind of violence while continually traumatizing the victims and survivors,” he said.He did explain that the shooter had previously been enrolled in the class and while he was “engaged” early in the semester, the shooter stopped coming to class and Johnson was told that he withdrew.Johnson said that he ran into the shooter shortly after learning that he withdrew from the class, which he estimates was either in late January or early February and “conveyed that it was a shame that they had to leave the course but I understood.”Johnson said students told him that the shooter didn’t say anything until after he emptied his gun magazine.“One victim asked the shooter to stop shooting and [the shooter] said ‘I’m done,’” Johnson wrote.In addition to addressing what he feels are the larger underlying sociological and philosophical issues related to mass shootings, he thanked his friends and community who have supported him in the aftermath.“I am still trying to get an [sic] handle on my personal feelings surrounding this and I find it cathartic to engage with it anthropologically,” he wrote.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

8-year-old applauded for asking to report on aviation pioneer Bessie Coleman instead of Amelia Earhart

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — When 8-year-old Noa Lewis was assigned a school project on Amelia Earhart, she flipped the script and asked instead to report on Bessie Coleman, who was the first female African American and Native American pilot.Noa and her second-grade class were given the assignment to create and be a part of a “wax museum,” with each student embodying their assigned historical figure. Noa had originally been assigned Amelia Earhart, the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.“Noa knew about Amelia Earhart but she told her teacher she wanted another figure but couldn’t remember the name,” Moniqua Lewis, Noa’s mother, told Good Morning America.Lewis was picking up her daughter from school when Noa told her mom about the project and about how she wanted to report on a person who was once featured in her favorite Disney show, –Doc McStuffins. Lewis was naming names, trying to help her daughter remember who it was.It turns out it was Bessie Coleman, or “Queen Bessie,” as Noa refers to her. Coleman was the first female African American and Native American to hold a pilot’s license.Lewis saw how passionate Noa was about Bessie Coleman, so as Noa’s teacher was exiting the school, she asked her if her daughter could instead report on Coleman.“My job is to support my child,” Lewis said. Luckily, Noa’s teacher agreed.Noa dove right into researching Coleman, gathering books from the library and articles from the internet, but a lot of books were “too hard” for the 8-year-old to read, Lewis told Good Morning America.So Noa and her mother reached out to the National Aviation Hall of Fame and National Women’s Hall of Fame to find out some additional information about Coleman to complete her project.The National Aviation Hall of Fame and National Women’s Hall of Fame responded to Lewis, giving Noa articles that matched her second-grade reading level, and Noa excitedly absorbed all the information she could about “Queen Bessie.”As part of the project, Noa had to dress up as Bessie Coleman to be part of the “wax museum.”So Noa donned a white dress blouse topped with a green trench jacket, along with brown casual dress trousers and high-top black boots.“My best friends were Georgia O’keeffe and Nancy Reagan,” Noa told Good Morning America, doing her very best Coleman impression.For all of Noa’s hard work and willingness to report on Coleman, the National Aviation Hall of Fame Museum decided to fly Noa and her family to the museum in Dayton, Ohio. There she got the privilege to meet a relative of her hero.Bessie Coleman’s great-niece, Gigi Coleman, greeted her when she arrived and awarded Noa a medallion for her outstanding project.Gigi Coleman has a one-woman show dedicated to portraying the legacy of her Great-Aunt Bessie Coleman. She also runs a 501(c)3 program, The Bessie Coleman Aviation All-Stars, to encourage disadvantaged youth to learn about career opportunities in the field of aviation.After meeting Coleman and learning even more about her hero, Noa also got to have a private closed tour of the facility.“I was so happy when Gigi Coleman put the medal around my neck,” Noa said. She says she was even more excited when Coleman called her “Little Bessie.”As a token of appreciation, Noa drew a portrait of Bessie Coleman and gifted it to Gigi Coleman.After all her hard work, Noa ended up receiving an “A” on the project at North Cobb Christian School.“Noa is an overachiever! When you’re assigned homework, it’s homework — but when you are in love with something and have a passion for it, it is much more,” Lewis said. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Remains of 12-year-old Colorado girl who vanished in 1984 found at ‘clandestine burial site’: Police

first_imgGreeley Police Dept.(GREELEY, Colo.) — The remains of a 12-year-old Colorado girl were discovered this week at “clandestine burial site,” decades after she mysteriously vanished, officials said.Crews were excavating an area in rural Weld County for a pipeline on Tuesday when they found Jonelle Matthews’ remains, Greeley Police said.Jonelle was 12 years old when she was last seen going into her home the night of Dec. 20, 1984, police said.“This case has weighed on the hearts of the Greeley Police Department, the family and the entire city of Greeley,” police said in a statement on Thursday.Jonelle lived in Greeley, which is located in the same county where her remains were found.Foul play is suspected, Greeley Police Sgt. J.P. Tymkowych told ABC News.Additional information, including manner and cause of death, have not been released.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call the Detective Robert Cash at 970-350-9601 or the tip line at 970-351-5100.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Dorian strengthens to Category 1 hurricane as storms bears down on Puerto Rico

first_imgABC New(NEW YORK) — Dorian strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane Wednesday as it lashed the U.S. and British Virgin Islands with heavy rain and took aim at Puerto Rico.After the storm passes through Puerto Rico, it will move north, potentially becoming a major Category 3 hurricane when it reaches Florida over the holiday weekend.Dorian won’t make landfall in Puerto Rico but will pass to the east of the island Wednesday afternoon and evening, bringing up to 75 mph winds, 10 inches of rain and possibly flash flooding. The Puerto Rican government said it is fully prepared for the storm’s impact. Gov. Wanda Vazquez said Monday night that the government is 90% ready to deal with any possible damage Dorian might cause.Meanwhile, many in Puerto Rico are still reeling from the devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Maria, including tens of thousands of residents living under blue tarp roofs.More than 7,400 generators and three mega generators are already on the island, according to the governor, and at least 360 shelters will open, accommodating up to 48,500 people.President Donald Trump has approved an emergency declaration, which will provide federal assistance in Puerto Rico.“The communication with all [of the president’s] aides has been extraordinary,” Vazquez said Monday.A new Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) representative is on the island assisting in response coordination.The response “will be on top of a complex recovery effort,” a FEMA spokesperson said. “Even a smaller and less severe storm could have significant impact.”Once Dorian passes through the Caribbean, it’s forecast to steer toward Florida over the Labor Day weekend.Dorian could make landfall on the East Coast of Florida on Monday morning as a major Category 3 hurricane with winds up to 115 mph. The Southeast coastline from Miami to Charleston could see impacts.Jacksonville, Florida, will activate its emergency operations center full-time as Dorian nears, Mayor Lenny Curry said at a news conference Wednesday.Curry said it’s too early to make any decisions about possible evacuations, but residents should make sure they know their evacuation zone.The storm is also impacting Labor Day travelers. Some airlines have issued travel waivers, and Royal Caribbean is closing its private island in the Bahamas for a week and altering some of its cruise ship itineraries to avoid Dorian.As the Atlantic hurricane season nears Sept. 10 — its peak — Dorian isn’t the only storm on the move. Newly-formed Tropical Storm Erin is expected to bring rough surf to the East Coast beaches from the Carolinas to New England this Labor Day weekend.Otherwise, it is not expected to directly impact the East Coast.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Hurricane Dorian’s death toll rises to 21 as it charges up Southeast coast; may make landfall in Carolinas

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Dorian has killed at least 20 in the Bahamas, as well as an elderly man in North Carolina, as the storm looms close to the Southeast coast.Dorian, now a Category 2, is churning parallel to northeast Florida and might make landfall as it inches closer to the Carolinas.‘Time to get out is running out’Dorian is now hovering just off the coast of Florida and southern Georgia, pummeling the Sunshine State to Savannah to South Carolina with rain.A hurricane warning is in effect for the entire South Carolina and North Carolina coastline, which is set to face the brunt of the storm and a dangerous storm surge of up to 8 feet.One storm-related death already struck North Carolina. An 85-year-old man fell off a ladder while preparing his Columbus County home for Dorian, Gov. Roy Cooper said Wednesday.Evacuations were ordered from Florida’s east coast to North Carolina’s Outer Banks.Kevin McAleenan, acting secretary of Homeland Security, told Univision that undocumented immigrants should not “worry about immigration enforcement during the storm — worry about staying safe.”“There will be no routine immigration enforcement during this storm or in the immediate aftermath of this storm,” McAleenan said.Melbourne Beach, Florida, resident Nancy Whiting lives in an evacuation area, but she opted to ride out the storm in her home — the same as she did for Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Irma in 2017 — to address leaks right as they hit.“A lot of the neighbors stayed back. They tend to hunker down, just ride out the storm. They’ve been through a lot of these before,” Whiting told ABC News. “This is what happens in Florida — you stay and protect your property and help out your neighbors.”But officials are urging those in evacuation zones to flee the coast immediately.“If you are still in an evacuation zone you still have time to get out — but time to get out is running out,” South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said Wednesday.“It’s the water that kills people,” McMaster warned, “and it’s clear that we’re going to have a lot of water.”Storm surge will push the water inland into the marshes and the rivers, he said, and at the same time the rain could reach 15 inches, creating “a collision of water” along the coast.Although for some, evacuating isn’t an option. Frances Eason’s husband, David, is spending the hurricane in a Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, hospital.“We went through [Hurricane] Hugo in 1989 and we went through Florence last October and several in between,” Frances Eason told ABC News. “We fared well through it all.”“I think we’re safe here,” she said.For coastal residents who choose not to evacuate, McMaster recommends staying indoors in an interior room and away from windows and glass doors, closing the curtains and blinds, and securing important personal documents.And even if there’s a lull, don’t go outside, McMaster warned — because that could be the eye of the hurricane.Dorian’s pathDorian is forecast to pass Savannah, Georgia, overnight Wednesday into Thursday, bringing powerful wind gusts and dangerous storm surge.The storm will then come close to Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday. Authorities in Charleston are urging the residents who chose not to evacuate to stay off the roads; authorities said during a storm last year, 40 people were rescues from flooded cars.From Charleston, the storm will approach Myrtle Beach then North Carolina’s coast. North Carolina’s Outer Banks will get hit late Thursday into Friday morning.Landfall in possible in coastal South Carolina or North Carolina anytime Thursday night through Friday morning.Regardless of landfall, Dorian will be close enough to the Carolina coasts to bring near-hurricane-force winds, storm surge and flooding. The biggest threat will likely be coastal flooding from Charleston to the Outer Banks. Up to 15 inches of rain is possible.Devastation in the BahamasBefore reaching the U.S., Dorian slammed into the Bahamas on Sunday afternoon as a Category 5 storm, the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record.At least 20 people were killed in the northern Bahamas, where the storm made landfall, according to Bahamas Health Minister Dr. Duane Sands.“We can expect more deaths to be recorded,” Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters Tuesday. “Our priority at this time is search, rescue and recovery.”The storm hovered over the archipelago’s northern islands for nearly two days, leveling dozens of buildings, flooding roads and submerging an airport.Theo Neilly, the Bahamas consul general to the United States, said the greatest need is for water, nonperishable food, generators, tents and tarp poles.“We’re receiving supplies and we’re looking for people who can assist with shipping,” Neilly told ABC News on Tuesday.The British Royal Navy was expected to deliver food to the hard-hit Abaco Islands Tuesday night, according to the Bahamian prime minister. The U.S. Department of State said it’s providing humanitarian assistance, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it’s rescued 61 people.Margaret Hospital in Nassau is now the only hospital capable of treating the most seriously injured in the Bahamas, said Dr. Caroline Burnett-Garraway, medical chief of staff at the hospital.The hospital has received 38 patients, including children, who were evacuated from hard-hit islands, she said. Three of the patients, all men, died after arriving at the hospital, Burnett-Garraway said.Evacuees’ injuries range from head injuries to broken bones to dehydration, she said, as many of them were subjected to floodwaters and intense winds for days. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,ABC News(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Dorian has killed at least 20 in the Bahamas, as well as an elderly man in North Carolina, as the storm looms close to the Southeast coast.Dorian, now a Category 2, is churning parallel to northeast Florida and might make landfall as it inches closer to the Carolinas.‘Time to get out is running out’Dorian is now hovering just off the coast of Florida and southern Georgia, pummeling the Sunshine State to Savannah to South Carolina with rain.A hurricane warning is in effect for the entire South Carolina and North Carolina coastline, which is set to face the brunt of the storm and a dangerous storm surge of up to 8 feet.One storm-related death already struck North Carolina. An 85-year-old man fell off a ladder while preparing his Columbus County home for Dorian, Gov. Roy Cooper said Wednesday.Evacuations were ordered from Florida’s east coast to North Carolina’s Outer Banks.Kevin McAleenan, acting secretary of Homeland Security, told Univision that undocumented immigrants should not “worry about immigration enforcement during the storm — worry about staying safe.”“There will be no routine immigration enforcement during this storm or in the immediate aftermath of this storm,” McAleenan said.Melbourne Beach, Florida, resident Nancy Whiting lives in an evacuation area, but she opted to ride out the storm in her home — the same as she did for Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Irma in 2017 — to address leaks right as they hit.“A lot of the neighbors stayed back. They tend to hunker down, just ride out the storm. They’ve been through a lot of these before,” Whiting told ABC News. “This is what happens in Florida — you stay and protect your property and help out your neighbors.”But officials are urging those in evacuation zones to flee the coast immediately.“If you are still in an evacuation zone you still have time to get out — but time to get out is running out,” South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster said Wednesday.“It’s the water that kills people,” McMaster warned, “and it’s clear that we’re going to have a lot of water.”Storm surge will push the water inland into the marshes and the rivers, he said, and at the same time the rain could reach 15 inches, creating “a collision of water” along the coast.Although for some, evacuating isn’t an option. Frances Eason’s husband, David, is spending the hurricane in a Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, hospital.“We went through [Hurricane] Hugo in 1989 and we went through Florence last October and several in between,” Frances Eason told ABC News. “We fared well through it all.”“I think we’re safe here,” she said.For coastal residents who choose not to evacuate, McMaster recommends staying indoors in an interior room and away from windows and glass doors, closing the curtains and blinds, and securing important personal documents.And even if there’s a lull, don’t go outside, McMaster warned — because that could be the eye of the hurricane.Dorian’s pathDorian is forecast to pass Savannah, Georgia, overnight Wednesday into Thursday, bringing powerful wind gusts and dangerous storm surge.The storm will then come close to Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday. Authorities in Charleston are urging the residents who chose not to evacuate to stay off the roads; authorities said during a storm last year, 40 people were rescues from flooded cars.From Charleston, the storm will approach Myrtle Beach then North Carolina’s coast. North Carolina’s Outer Banks will get hit late Thursday into Friday morning.Landfall in possible in coastal South Carolina or North Carolina anytime Thursday night through Friday morning.Regardless of landfall, Dorian will be close enough to the Carolina coasts to bring near-hurricane-force winds, storm surge and flooding. The biggest threat will likely be coastal flooding from Charleston to the Outer Banks. Up to 15 inches of rain is possible.Devastation in the BahamasBefore reaching the U.S., Dorian slammed into the Bahamas on Sunday afternoon as a Category 5 storm, the strongest Atlantic hurricane landfall on record.At least 20 people were killed in the northern Bahamas, where the storm made landfall, according to Bahamas Health Minister Dr. Duane Sands.“We can expect more deaths to be recorded,” Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis told reporters Tuesday. “Our priority at this time is search, rescue and recovery.”The storm hovered over the archipelago’s northern islands for nearly two days, leveling dozens of buildings, flooding roads and submerging an airport.Theo Neilly, the Bahamas consul general to the United States, said the greatest need is for water, nonperishable food, generators, tents and tarp poles.“We’re receiving supplies and we’re looking for people who can assist with shipping,” Neilly told ABC News on Tuesday.The British Royal Navy was expected to deliver food to the hard-hit Abaco Islands Tuesday night, according to the Bahamian prime minister. The U.S. Department of State said it’s providing humanitarian assistance, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it’s rescued 61 people.Margaret Hospital in Nassau is now the only hospital capable of treating the most seriously injured in the Bahamas, said Dr. Caroline Burnett-Garraway, medical chief of staff at the hospital.The hospital has received 38 patients, including children, who were evacuated from hard-hit islands, she said. Three of the patients, all men, died after arriving at the hospital, Burnett-Garraway said.Evacuees’ injuries range from head injuries to broken bones to dehydration, she said, as many of them were subjected to floodwaters and intense winds for days. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Heavy storms set to hit Plains, new storm systems develop over Atlantic

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — More severe storms are expected in the Plains Wednesday as 90 damaging storm reports took place around the country Tuesday including 11 reported tornadoes in Wyoming and South Dakota. Some of the worst damage occurred in Sioux Falls, South Dakota where authorities are warning people not to go into the city due to storm damage and downed power lines.Severe weather threats will expand Wednesday from Wyoming all the way to Wisconsin with the biggest threat being damaging winds and huge hail with possible tornadoes. Hail the size of grapefruit fell in areas of Wyoming Tuesday and winds gusted up to 82 mph in Valentine, Nebraska, and 71 mph in Platte, South Dakota.Elsewhere, Tuesday was the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season as several tropical storm systems are developing.A tropical low is currently hovering over the southern Bahamas and will bring rain and a few thunderstorms to the northern Bahamas in areas that are trying to recover from Hurricane Dorian.Several models are showing this storm system moving over Florida later this week and possibly reemerging in the Gulf of Mexico as a tropical low.The National Hurricane Center is giving it a 50% chance for development into a tropical depression or tropical storm this weekend.But regardless of formation, heavy rain is expected from the Bahamas into Florida and possibly the Gulf Coast into the weekend and end of the week.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More