Category: fofabvlic

8-year-old applauded for asking to report on aviation pioneer Bessie Coleman instead of Amelia Earhart

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — When 8-year-old Noa Lewis was assigned a school project on Amelia Earhart, she flipped the script and asked instead to report on Bessie Coleman, who was the first female African American and Native American pilot.Noa and her second-grade class were given the assignment to create and be a part of a “wax museum,” with each student embodying their assigned historical figure. Noa had originally been assigned Amelia Earhart, the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.“Noa knew about Amelia Earhart but she told her teacher she wanted another figure but couldn’t remember the name,” Moniqua Lewis, Noa’s mother, told Good Morning America.Lewis was picking up her daughter from school when Noa told her mom about the project and about how she wanted to report on a person who was once featured in her favorite Disney show, –Doc McStuffins. Lewis was naming names, trying to help her daughter remember who it was.It turns out it was Bessie Coleman, or “Queen Bessie,” as Noa refers to her. Coleman was the first female African American and Native American to hold a pilot’s license.Lewis saw how passionate Noa was about Bessie Coleman, so as Noa’s teacher was exiting the school, she asked her if her daughter could instead report on Coleman.“My job is to support my child,” Lewis said. Luckily, Noa’s teacher agreed.Noa dove right into researching Coleman, gathering books from the library and articles from the internet, but a lot of books were “too hard” for the 8-year-old to read, Lewis told Good Morning America.So Noa and her mother reached out to the National Aviation Hall of Fame and National Women’s Hall of Fame to find out some additional information about Coleman to complete her project.The National Aviation Hall of Fame and National Women’s Hall of Fame responded to Lewis, giving Noa articles that matched her second-grade reading level, and Noa excitedly absorbed all the information she could about “Queen Bessie.”As part of the project, Noa had to dress up as Bessie Coleman to be part of the “wax museum.”So Noa donned a white dress blouse topped with a green trench jacket, along with brown casual dress trousers and high-top black boots.“My best friends were Georgia O’keeffe and Nancy Reagan,” Noa told Good Morning America, doing her very best Coleman impression.For all of Noa’s hard work and willingness to report on Coleman, the National Aviation Hall of Fame Museum decided to fly Noa and her family to the museum in Dayton, Ohio. There she got the privilege to meet a relative of her hero.Bessie Coleman’s great-niece, Gigi Coleman, greeted her when she arrived and awarded Noa a medallion for her outstanding project.Gigi Coleman has a one-woman show dedicated to portraying the legacy of her Great-Aunt Bessie Coleman. She also runs a 501(c)3 program, The Bessie Coleman Aviation All-Stars, to encourage disadvantaged youth to learn about career opportunities in the field of aviation.After meeting Coleman and learning even more about her hero, Noa also got to have a private closed tour of the facility.“I was so happy when Gigi Coleman put the medal around my neck,” Noa said. She says she was even more excited when Coleman called her “Little Bessie.”As a token of appreciation, Noa drew a portrait of Bessie Coleman and gifted it to Gigi Coleman.After all her hard work, Noa ended up receiving an “A” on the project at North Cobb Christian School.“Noa is an overachiever! When you’re assigned homework, it’s homework — but when you are in love with something and have a passion for it, it is much more,” Lewis said. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Things can only get better

first_imgThings can only get betterOn 1 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Asiahas a lot of business potential for multinationals. And the culture in theregion is starting to change for the better, says Ed PetersMultinationalsseeking to take a dive into Asian waters need to look before they leap,although most of the major multinationals are in the region already – in oneform or another. The most popular country in the region appears to be China.Indeed, China’s admission to the World Trade Organisation is provoking astampede of smaller and medium-sized companies (from suppliers and contractorsto the law firms and multinationals). US real estate companies are alsosuddenly waking up to the potential Asia has to offer. Thosemultinationals wanting to enter into this region for the first time should beaware that they will encounter many HR challenges. The region is a crossroadsof cultures; its many different countries are at vastly different levels ofdevelopment; and financial upheavals may well be on the horizon. Ontop of this, local politics can add spice to an already precarious situation.For example, at one stage the Indonesian government was considering legislationwhich decreed that no corporation could employ more than three foreigners. Thescheme was little more than a pre-election vote catcher, but it did cause variousmultinationals – who would have been unable to continue operations withouttheir full complement of expatriate executives – more than a little heartache.Thisexample serves to illustrate one of the major problems multinationals canexpect to encounter: the pool of labour – apart from the inexpensive manualkind – is limited. While Asians place a high value on education, localresources are often insufficient, whether because of poor funding or inadequateteaching methods. Foreign study is highly prized, but those lucky and cleverenough to attend school overseas very often stay put once they have graduated,or come home to start their own businesses. Multinationals are thus often facedwith the choice of a painstaking local headhunt and possibly having to train upnew recruits into the bargain, or bringing in staff from abroad, with all theextra expense that entails.JohnAmbler of the New York-based Social Science Research Council has made anextensive study of the problem of Asian educational practices. “Asia isnot alone in placing great respect on the teacher. However, while rote learningfacilitates the transmission of state values and doctrine and facts, it doesnot encourage creative thinking and problem solving,” he says.”Criticismand scepticism are threatening to societies which see educational systems asmechanisms for social control, but it is the critics and the sceptics who willbecome the problem solvers that Asia needs to stay competitive in a worldmarket and to handle the new social and technical issues arising from rapidchange within its societies,” he adds.Ambleralso points out that skill levels need to be increased if Asian countries areto move from labour-intensive to skill-intensive industries, and not simplyrely on attracting multinationals through cheap rents and staff costs.Thailand, for example, has the infrastructure for continued growth but suffersfrom a lack of skilled personnel, which in turn hampers its ability to bring innew investment. “Management talent, which requires integrative thinkingand initiative, will be in short supply as many Asian countries that have basedtheir economies on cheap labour try to make the jump to more value-addedindustry,” he notes.Labourlaws can also provoke problems. A certain xenophobia prevails in most Asiancountries, with multinationals welcomed for the business they bring in yetresented solely on the grounds that they are foreign. This is even the case incountries like Thailand, which has never been colonised. In South Korea, theport manager for an international airline was once flabbergasted by a demandfrom the union leader that all the local staff should receive an immediate payrise to compensate for the “indignity” of working for a foreigncorporation. And even when disputes get taken to court, the judiciary oftensides with the local underdog, as multinationals are seen as having a lot ofmoney, so it won’t hurt them to pay some more to their relatively impoverishedemployees.WhileKorea and Thailand are more developed than some of their neighbours, countrieslike Vietnam can provide examples of business practice that apply tomultinationals right across the region. Irwin Jay Robinson, an internationaltrade lawyer based in the US who has had long experience of business dealingsin Vietnam, offers a number of pointers for multinationals thinking of basingthemselves in the country, but who want to “lose a little lessmoney”. “It’svital to select tough, experienced, ‘Asia-smart’ management staff for any majorproject,” he says. “Doing business in Vietnam is so complicated thatthe educational experience can be costly – it’s by no means a place forweaklings or beginners.” Headds that once in place, managers should be savvy enough to wring everypossible tax concession and tax benefit available under Vietnamese law, withthe proper documentation from the appropriate national and local governmentagencies, before they even think about going ahead with any investment. “Ifthe managers are not tough enough to get everything they want – and they shouldinsist too that the foreign-language version of any agreement should prevail inthe case of a dispute – then the project will founder. Getting the rightmanager is the key,” he says.Robinson’swarnings are echoed by independent consultant Alun Lee Wing, who has worked fora number of multinationals setting up in the People’s Republic of China (PRC).Lee stresses that many corporations had moved into China because economicrestrictions had been lifted and a business culture was encouraged, but theyhad then run up against unforeseen hurdles.”Quitea lot of companies think that it will be the same as doing business at home butwith fewer overheads – they couldn’t be more wrong,” he says.”Managers can get burnt out by the culture in China, as business operatesvery much on who you know. Plus, it is only in the past couple of decades thatthe PRC has started to look at things in a commercial light. “Alot of people who are working for state corporations are political appointees withno idea of how to do business. Their reaction to a foreigner coming in to do adeal with them is to back off and see what he or she has to offer. It can bevery frustrating to somebody from abroad with their eye on the bottom line!”ButLee does offer some hope for the future: “The culture is changinggradually, and in fact, in China and all over Asia, there is a school ofthought that says the way of doing business doesn’t have to be just the localway. “As long as Asia can avoid any more financial crises, andmultinationals continue to move into the region prepared to tackle HR and otherproblems head on, business here can only get better.”Who’sgoing where?Aswell as the multinationals – many of which are already in the region – lawfirms and US real estate companies are making their way into Asia Pacific. Themost popular destinations are:–China–Thailand–Taiwan–Korea Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Predictions of critical transitions with non-stationary reduced order models

first_imgHere we demonstrate the ability of stochastic reduced order models to predict the statistics of non-stationary systems undergoing critical transitions. First, we show that the reduced order models are able to accurately predict the autocorrelation function and probability density functions (PDF) of higher dimensional systems with time-dependent slow forcing of either the resolved or unresolved modes. Second, we demonstrate that whether the system tips early or repeatedly jumps between the two equilibrium points (flickering) depends on the strength of the coupling between the resolved and unresolved modes and the time scale separation. Both kinds of behaviour have been found to preceed critical transitions in earlier studies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reduced order models are also able to predict the timing of critical transitions. The skill of various proposed tipping indicators are discussed.last_img read more

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Bakery focus for RGFC as it sells off fish division

first_imgReal Good Food Company (RGFC) is selling its Five Star Fish division to British Seafood for £35 million.This sale leaves the company with bakery, baking ingredients and sugar companies. These include Hayden’s Bakeries, Seriously Scrumptious, Renshaw and Napier Brown Foods.RGFC said this week that it aims to grow both through acquisitions and organically.In 2003, RGFC acquired Hayden’s Bakeries and Seriously Scrumptious and, the following year, acquired Grimsby-based Five Star Fish.The fish company supplies value-added, prepared frozen fish to the foodservice sector. It deli-vers to 100 customers nationwide and employs approximately 200 people.RFGC also acquired Eurofoods in 2004, trading as Coolfresh Distribution, but closed it in 2005, when it bought Napier Brown Foods and Renshaw.last_img read more

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Speech: Chief Medical Officer on the Amesbury nerve agent incident

first_imgTwo patients are in a critical condition following exposure to the nerve agent Novichok.Following events in March, we have a well-established response to this type of incident and a clear process to follow. Our priority at this time is to understand the circumstances surrounding how these 2 individuals became unwell, and to ensure there is no further risk to the public’s health from this incident.As the country’s Chief Medical Officer, I want to reassure the public that the risk to the general public remains low. I understand that those in Salisbury and its surrounding areas will be concerned at this news, particularly those who have recently visited the areas now cordoned off by the police.My advice for any individual that may have been in any of the areas now cordoned off from 10pm on Friday evening onwards is highly precautionary. As before, wash your clothes and wipe down any personal items, shoes and bags with cleansing or baby wipes before disposing of them in the usual way.This is the same public health advice I gave during the previous incident, a belt and braces approach. I should also warn that the public should be careful, as always, of picking up any unknown or already dangerous objects such as needles and syringes.You do not need to seek advice from a health professional unless you are experiencing symptoms – any individual who had been significantly exposed at the same time would by now have symptoms. Those people from that area who are concerned that they are experiencing symptoms should call NHS 111.I also want to highlight, that the areas of Salisbury already cleaned and back in use, like the Maltings, are safe.I’d like to commend the professionalism of our emergency staff as well as those at Salisbury District Hospital, particularly the intensive care unit.And I particularly want to reiterate, the police are still investigating how this event happened. The public should continue to follow the advice of the police and that of Public Health England. We will ensure regular updates as we get further information.last_img read more

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Press release: PM meeting with the First Minister of Wales: 3 April 2019

first_img The Prime Minister and First Minister of Wales met to discuss the next steps in reaching a consensus in Parliament to allow the UK’s smooth and orderly exit from the EU. A Downing Street spokesperson said: She was clear that leaving with a deal remains the best solution to ensure that we deliver on what people in Wales and the rest of the UK voted for.center_img The Prime Minister reaffirmed her commitment to working with MPs from across the political spectrum and they agreed that compromises needed to be reached in order to honour the result of the referendum.last_img read more

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Press release: New funding to help hospitals introduce digital prescribing

first_img World Patient Safety Day is an important opportunity to reflect on the vital work that goes on across the NHS to protect patients from harm, and to thank staff for their efforts to keep patients safe. Patient safety is of paramount importance and is something we are continuously looking at ways to improve, whether through new technology, such as the introduction of electronic prescribing, or by building a safety culture where all NHS staff feel supported and safe to speak up. In addition to streamlining hospital prescribing, the UK government has an ongoing commitment to strengthen the NHS workforce and train 50,000 new nurses, which will help to minimise workload pressures and ensure NHS services are appropriately staffed. Following this year’s A level results, over 25,750 applicants have been placed on nursing and midwifery courses at English providers, an increase of 22% on the same time last year. The latest NHS People Plan, published in July, also sets out how the NHS will improve physical and mental support for all staff.The Minister for Patient Safety will also be paying a virtual visit to University Hospital Southampton alongside NHS England’s National Patient Safety Director Dr Aidan Fowler to hear about how they are protecting their hospital staff and patients during the coronavirus pandemic.National Director of Patient Safety Dr Aidan Fowler said: To mark World Patient Safety Day today, Minister Nadine Dorries confirms £8.7 million to help 7 NHS trusts introduce digital patient records to hospitals E-prescribing has already been rolled out to over 130 NHS trusts The new technology helps the NHS to access patient history and prescribe medication digitally, which can reduce errors by up to 30% More patients and healthcare staff will benefit from single electronic patient records as 7 hospital trusts receive a share of £8.7 million to introduce digital records and e-prescribing, Minister for Patient Safety Nadine Dorries announced today on World Patient Safety Day.The roll-out has already been introduced to over 130 NHS trusts, and is part of a £78 million investment to deliver the ambition set out in the NHS Long Term Plan to introduce electronic prescribing systems across the NHS.NHS trusts will now be able to more quickly access potentially lifesaving information on prescribed medicines and patient history, and build a more complete, single electronic patient record, which reduces duplication of information-gathering, saves staff time and can reduce medication errors by up to 30%.The funding was announced at a virtual conference organised by Imperial College London to mark World Patient Safety Day. This international day was started by the World Health Assembly in 2019 to recognise patient safety as a global health priority and is something the UK government had called for on the world stage.This year’s event is focusing on health worker safety during the COVID-19 pandemic, in recognition that combatting workplace issues such as stress, workload pressures and discrimination and creating a safer working environment for health workers can also minimise patient harm.Speaking at the Imperial College London event, Minister for Patient Safety Nadine Dorries said: The Department of Health and Social Care and its health partners will use learnings and outcomes from this year’s World Patient Safety Day events to build a safer culture and safer systems for both patients and healthcare workers through our patient safety strategy.Background informationWorld Patient Safety DayAn annual World Patient Safety Day on 17 September was agreed by the World Health Assembly in 2019 when it adopted a UK-led resolution on ‘Global Action on Patient Safety’ that included the awareness day and which encourages all 194 World Health Organization member states to prioritise patient safety.The Department of Health and Social Care offices at 39 Victoria Street, Westminster are being illuminated in orange today.Nadine Dorries MP will be addressing 2 virtual seminars to mark the day: World Patient Safety Day this year comes at a more important time than ever, with healthcare systems and workers across the world tested like never before. In my role I have seen first-hand the dedication and care demonstrated by so many of my colleagues in the NHS and this year’s theme of health worker safety is a vital one. Today I am also pleased to announce the 7 trusts receiving a share of £8.7 million to help eliminate paper prescriptions. This will not only help reduce potentially deadly medication errors but save our hardworking staff valuable time. £16.2 million was awarded in 2018 to 2019 £29.4 million was awarded in 2019 to 2020 another £12 million will be invested later this year £8.7 million e-prescribing fundingThis funding is the third wave from a £78 million pot to improve patient care by speeding up the implementation of electronic prescribing systems across the NHS over 3 years: Imperial College will host a seminar entitled COVID-19 and the Drive for Safety and Equality – Learning from the Front Line, with a focus on the perspectives of black, Asian and ethnic minority front-line staff working during the pandemic the World Health Organization will host a seminar entitled ‘Oneworld: Global solidarity for health worker safety and patient safety’ to bring together global stakeholders demonstrating initiatives that support health worker safety. The 7 NHS trusts receiving this fund are: Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust: £ 1,700,000 Solent NHS Trust: £988,000 Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust: £637,000 United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust: £1,258,000 North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Trust: £2,000,000 East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust: £1,595,000 Birmingham Community NHS Trust: £531,000last_img read more

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Trade bodies combat negative image of bread

first_imgTwo bakery trade organisations have met up to discuss the negative press around bread.The Federation of Bakers (FoB) and the Craft Bakers’ Association (CBA) met last week and British Baker understands that combatting the misconceptions around bread were high on the agenda.The talks took place in the week that Prime Minister David Cameron announced his decision to give up bread in a bid to lose weight. British Baker has contacted Number 10 regarding Cameron’s decision to cut bread, and is awaiting a reply.Speaking to British Baker, Gordon Polson, FoB director, said: “Part of the ongoing public relations work that we have been doing for years is about combating the negative image of bread and, in particular, the idea that eating carbohydrates isn’t good for you.“If you go back to basic dietary advice, we all know your diet should be made up of complex carbs, of which bread is an important part.”The FoB runs a campaign around this issue called Slice of Life, which has previously launched stunts like ‘don’t feed the ducks’ and a spoof ‘how to pack a lunchbox’ video.Polson said: “We are working up to activities for 2015, but nothing is agreed as yet.”He also directed a statement at the Prime Minister, urging him to eat bread, “To David Cameron, and anyone else who is cutting bread from their diet this January in the hope of losing weight, we urge them not to act so fast.”Alan Clarke, chief executive of Scottish Bakers, likened Cameron’s shunning of bread to the uproar fellow politician Edwina Currie caused when she alleged that all eggs contain salmonella, prompting plummeting egg sales overnight.“I was worried that he was having an ‘Eggwina’ moment,” Clarke told British Baker. “You do have to worry about nutrition and diet, but everything in moderation. Bread, as part of a healthy balanced diet, is good.”The British Baker team have been having some fun with the PM’s bread ditch, and our designer has come up with this cartoon… feel free to share it on social media!last_img read more

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Colombia to Sell Off Oil Shares for Emergency

first_imgBy Dialogo January 04, 2011 Colombia will sell 10 percent of its shares in Ecuador’s state oil giant, Ecopetrol, to fund its response to a devastating rainy season that has killed 303 people and left 2.2 million homeless, an official said. Energy and Mining Minister Carlos Rodado said the sale should generate about eight billion dollars which would be put in a reconstruction fund for infrastructure projects such as highways and bridges. An extraordinarily heavy rainy season, which forecasters blame on the La Niña weather phenomenon, has left widespread devastation in Colombia and major damage in Venezuela to the east. The share sale is one of several major measures being taken by President Juan Manuel Santos’ government to respond to the crisis. Taxes also are being raised to generate another two billion dollars for the response. Damage has been considerable over 85 percent of Colombian territory, and has been estimated at some five billion dollars. The annual rainy season has been exacerbated by a La Niña phenomenon, in which cooler-than-normal water circulates in the Pacific Ocean around the equator.last_img read more

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Avian flu in Myanmar concerns FAO

first_imgApr 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Avian influenza is continuing its spread among birds in many countries worldwide, with widespread outbreaks reported in Myanmar.More than 100 outbreaks have occurred in poultry in Myanmar (formerly Burma) since the presence of H5N1 avian flu was announced there about a month ago, officials from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) told Reuters news service yesterday.The bulk of the outbreaks appear to be occurring in Mandalay in central Myanmar and Sagaing in the northern part of the country, said He Changchui of the FAO. Two FAO teams have been on the ground in Myanmar.David Nabarro, avian flu coordinator with the United Nations, said the country has major problems. “We’re going to be focusing on Myanmar a lot in the next few days and weeks, trying to make sure that the authorities and civil society in that country are able to cope better,” he said.A World Health Organization (WHO) team will travel to Yangon at the end of April to assess how well people are being protected from the H5N1 virus spreading in poultry, Reuters reported.Myanmar’s military leadership is known for secrecy. The WHO describes communicable diseases as a major health problem in the nation.Other nations are fighting more public battles with the virus:Niger began culling poultry Apr 9, more than a month after H5N1 was first found in the country. The country had sought international help, saying it couldn’t conduct the culling on its own, Reuters reported Apr 9.Nigeria reported another nine outbreaks, mainly in commercial poultry, in Bauchi, Kaduna, and Jos, the country noted in an OIE report filed at the beginning of this month. The affected species include ostriches, emus, and black-crowned cranes.Israel has seen two new outbreaks in Jerusalem and HaDarom, totaling 50,000 birds, an OIE report said.The OIE continues to log more individual bird deaths and wild bird outbreaks in Europe, including in Croatia, Czech Republic (according to AFP), Denmark, France, Germany, Poland, Slovenia, and Switzerland.As avian cases spread in many parts of the world, officials in Thailand issued a final report on H5N1 to the OIE, claiming victory in their lengthy battle against the virus. The Mar 31 follow-up report said it had been 140 days since the last case of highly pathogenic avian flu in Thailand. That announcement comes in tandem with broad-based surveillance that included more than 57,000 cloacal swab samples collected in February.In the United Kingdom, debate swirled over the significance of an H5N1-infected swan found dead and partially consumed in northern Scotland on Mar 29.”The one swan doesn’t mean it (the virus) has arrived here,” said Sir David King, the government’s chief scientific adviser, on Apr 9 in a story from The Independent newspaper.DNA testing has identified the bird as a whooper swan, a migratory species that winters in Britain, according to an online report today by The Guardian newspaper.Charles Milne, the Scottish chief veterinary officer, said it wasn’t possible to tell where the swan contracted the lethal virus, The Guardian reported.”We are working on the assumption that the bird migrated to this country, but it’s impossible to say precisely where it died,” Milne was quoted as saying. Other media reports today speculated that the dead bird may have floated ashore from another country.Of 3,397 birds tested in recent months, including 428 swans from Feb 1 to Apr 1, only the dead whooper swan has tested positive for H5N1, according to the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).See alsoOIE reportshttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A_AI-Asia.htmlast_img read more

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