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first_imgGenia’s masterclass was a cruel reminder for Reds fans that the star halfback no longer plies his trade at Ballymore but Queensland have far bigger concerns on their plate, with a suspension hanging over new skipper Scott Higginbotham’s head.Higginbotham was shown a red card for a high shoulder charge on Matt Philip in the 10th minute, putting his side on the back foot from the outset.By the letter of the law the decision to send Higginbotham for a particularly early shower may have been the right one as his shoulder did make direct contact with Philip’s head but Higginbotham argued his case that the Rebels lock was falling, with the no. 8 unable to wrap his arms around in the tackle.A suspension would have followed regardless of the colour of the card, but that it was a red ultimately proved game-defining.The Reds hung tough in the  20 minutes that followed and actually crossed for a serendipitous first try through Duncan Paia’aua but it was largely downhill from there.The Rebels, in contrast, took 10 minutes to shake the early nerves but under the guidance of Genia, looked a far more settled side than what was expected, given seven of their starting XV weren’t in Melbourne this time last year.Sefa Naivalu nabbed a first-half double – he collected a suspect Lopeti Timani pass adjudged to be flat before Jack Maddocks threw a crisp cutout to set up the flying Fijian’s second – but it was the playmaking hand of Genia that will have put smiles on Rebels fans’ faces.It was his initiative that created two tries inside six minutes before the half-time siren sounded, sending Tom English over after the forward pack won a penalty against a six-man Reds scrum feed before drawing two men and putting Dane Haylett-Petty over for his first of the night.That sent Melbourne into the sheds up 26-14 and things were well and truly one-way traffic from there.Brad Thorn has preached defence all preseason but there was none of it to be seen when Jack Debreczeni glided over from short range just two minutes into the second term, leaving the Reds staring at a 19-point deficit.The lacklustre defence was followed by a lazy pass from Paia’aua to gift Haylett-Petty a double, the Rebels fullback plucking a flashy no-look pass and racing away to score untouched from 70 out.The 56th minute arrived and Genia’s number was called but not before he set up Debreczeni’s second, Eto Nabuli offering a lazy tackle attempt as the flyhalf trotted over.Feauai-Sautia scored a deserved consolation try with 15 to play but it was too little, too late.The Rebels were mighty impressive in a performance that broke plenty of records, with their highest score ever and the first game in which they have scored more than six tries.Genia and Debreczeni looked as though they had been playing together for years, the forward pack dominated the battle of the gain line and the lineout wreaked havoc with Queensland’s ball.That creates a solid foundation to work with from this point forward but the caveat to all of that is that they only faced 14 men for the majority of the match, making this performance a fair bit harder to gauge.The Reds have an obvious excuse in being a player short for almost 70 minutes but there were some soft tries leaked in the second half and Thorn will have that in his sights come Monday.last_img read more

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first_imgSix people are facing 22 criminal charges after a two-day undercover drug bust in Dawson Creek.Dawson Creek RCMP say they executed two search warrants on March 6 as part of the undercover operation named EPLOVER, investigating street level cocaine trafficking. They seized undisclosed amounts of cocaine, marijuana and cash.- Advertisement -The five males and one female face several charges ranging from trafficking cocaine, conspiracy to traffic cocaine and possession of the proceeds of crime.One of the accused is alleged to have sold cocaine to an undercover officer twice throughout the investigation and had already been charged with selling cocaine to an undercover police officer several times last fall.Three of the six accused have been released on bail, while two remain in custody and another is still awaiting a bail hearing.Police say they are not releasing the accuseds’ names until after their first court appearance.Advertisement Anyone with information relating to drug activity in the Dawson Creek area is asked to contact the Dawson Creek RCMP detachment at 250-784-3700 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.last_img read more

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first_imgTullow Oil plc (Tullow), early this morning (Monday), announced that the Joe-1 exploration well has successfully opened a new Upper Tertiary oil play in the Guyana basin.This marks the second discovery for the London based oil company.“The Joe-1 exploration well was drilled by the Stena Forth drillship to a Total Depth of 2,175 metres in water depth of 780 metres. Evaluation of logging and sampling data has confirmed that Joe-1 has encountered 14 metres of net oil pay in high-quality oil bearing sandstone reservoirs of Upper Tertiary age. Joe is the first oil discovery to be made in the Upper Tertiary and de-risks the petroleum system in the west of the Orinduik block, where a significant number of Tertiary and Cretaceous age prospects have been identified,” the company said in a statement announcing the discovery.Tullow and its Partners will now evaluate data from the Joe-1 discovery alongside data from the Jethro-1 discovery announced in August 2019 and await the outcome of the Carapa well to determine the optimal follow-on exploration and appraisal programme.More details in the Tuesday, September 17, 2019 edition of the Guyana Times.last_img read more

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first_imgThree games played against Real Madrid, three wins, one European Cup won and ZERO GOALS CONCEDED.That is Liverpool’s record against Real Madrid in the competition that the Spanish giants like to think is their own.But Liverpool have a proud history of their own in Europe’s premier competition, and as the two clubs prepare to meet in Group B of the 2014/15 Champions League – broadcast exclusively live on talkSPORT – it is worth recalling the Reds’ pedigree at this level.Real Madrid may have won it 10 times, but they have been unable to breach the Reds goal in their three previous meetings. Will Ronaldo, Benzema and Rodriguez do what the Madrid greats of the past couldn’t?Liverpool 1-0 Real Madrid: 27 May, 1981 – European Cup finalHow the tables have turned. In 1981 Liverpool were playing in their third final in five years, whereas Real were competing in their first since winning a sixth European Cup with a 2-1 win over Partizan Belgrade in 1966. Liverpool were feared by Madrid, who were beaten by the all-conquering Reds thanks to an Alan Kennedy goal.Real Madrid 0-1 Liverpool: 25 February, 2009 – Champions League last 16 first legUnder the management of Rafa Benitez, Liverpool had again become a force among Europe’s elite, winning the trophy in 2005, reaching the 2007 final and 2008 semi-final. Madrid, by contrast, had lost at the last 16 stage five years in a row. The Merseysiders left the Bernabeu with a vital 1-0 win from the first leg of their last 16 clash. Yossi Benayoun headed in the game’s only goal with eight minutes remaining and Real had it all to do in the second leg at Anfield.Liverpool 4-0 Real Madrid: 10 March, 2009 – Champions League last 16 second legSpearheaded by Fernando Torres, once of Real’s arch rivals Atletico, Liverpool eased into the Champions League quarter-final and humiliated Madrid in the process. Torres scored first, before Steven Gerrard scored the second and third goals on his 100th European appearance for Liverpool and the night was capped off by Andrea Dossena, who grabbed his first goal for the club minutes before the final whistle.Liverpool v Real Madrid is live on talkSPORT on Wednesday 22 October, from 7pm. Liverpool v Real Madrid 1last_img read more

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first_imgUnderstandably, Connie Acosta hasn’t seen many smiles on her husband’s face since he returned in January from Iraq, where the Army reservist was blinded by shrapnel from a bomb blast. So she was overjoyed a few weeks ago when she walked into his room at the Army’s Eye Rehabilitation Clinic in Palo Alto, Calif., and saw the grin on Jesse Acosta’s face. “Do you know who just called me, honey?” the 49-year-old sergeant asked. “The Rock. He called me a hero, and told me to hang in there. We talked like we were old buddies. It was great.” Connie says she didn’t know whether to laugh or cry. It had been nearly a month since she had talked to Col. John South, an Army chaplain, about ways to cheer up her husband. He was awarded the Silver Star for bravery in Korea, and earlier this year was named official Ambassador for the Army Reserve, traveling all over the country every week on behalf of the men and women in the reserves. After talking with South, McEachin hung the phone up in his Encino home, and promised himself he wouldn’t let Sgt. Acosta down. He knew getting to the Rock wasn’t a slam dunk, though. Nothing in Hollywood – the land of inflated egos – is a slam dunk unless there’s money or an award involved. As the Army Reserve’s ambassador, McEachin hadn’t gotten far in persuading people in the entertainment industry to get involved in his Boots on the Ground program for injured soldiers and Marines returning home from Iraq. He’d hoped to persuade the small- and big-screen heroes to take a minute to make a phone call or a quick visit to a serviceman or woman lying in a hospital bed. “I just want Hollywood to step up to the plate and be a real hero, not just a movie hero, for these dedicated young men and women,” McEachin said. But Hollywood didn’t seem interested. Earlier this year, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences rebuffed McEachin’s request for two tickets to the Academy Awards that he wanted to give to a couple of returning Iraq war veterans. “I told them this had nothing to do with politics or supporting the war. It was about doing the right thing, and honoring our young men and women in the service today.” McEachin called the Rock’s people to let them know that one of his biggest fans was lying blind and depressed in an Army hospital bed. Then, he waited for the call back that never came. “I started calling them every day, bugging them. I kept thinking to myself this shouldn’t be this tough.” McEachin still doesn’t know if any of those earlier phone calls to agents and P.R. people ever got to the Rock personally, but in the end the actor did the right thing. He picked up the phone and said thank you to Sgt. Jesse Acosta, and put a smile on the hero’s face. It shouldn’t be that tough for other Hollywood stars to do the same. Dennis McCarthy’s column appears Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. dennis.mccarthy@dailynews.com (818) 713-3749 HOW TO HELP For more information on Boots on the Ground call James McEachin at (818) 501-3640 or e-mail him at mockinbrd@aol.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsHe was a big, tough guy who had gone to fight for his country, but he wasn’t feeling big or tough anymore. One of his favorite actors was the Rock – Dwayne Johnson, the professional wrestler turned tough-guy movie actor. Maybe a call from the Rock would lift Jesse’s spirits. “It isn’t unusual that soldiers in war often draw strength and try to portray themselves as movie characters doing the right thing and making a difference for their country,” South said. “Sure, war is reality, not a Hollywood movie. But deep down, a lot of soldiers want to emulate those Hollywood characters – the John Waynes and Gary Coopers – they admired for their bravery and toughness.” South called an Army buddy he’d met during the Korean War who later went into the acting business. Maybe he knew how to reach the Rock. James McEachin’s movie and television career has spanned four decades, including his recurring role as Lt. Brock in the popular Perry Mason television series. last_img read more

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first_imgDonegal North East TD Charlie McConalogue has called on the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte to extend the deadline for applications to the Rural Broadband Scheme by at least a month. The application process is currently due to close this Friday, 29 July 2011.Deputy McConalogue said:  “This scheme has been poorly advertised and I believe there are many people out there who are unaware that they are eligible to apply or that the deadline is this week.“Minister Rabbitte recently announced that over 2000 applications had been received by 8th July 201, however there is no doubt in my mind that there are still many rural dwellers in Donegal and across the country without broadband access who have not yet submitted applications. “In this day and age, internet access is necessary not a luxury.  While there has been significant progress over the years, it has not gone far enough.  Rather than pay lip-service to rural communities, I am asking the Minister to extend the deadline for applications to the Rural Broadband Scheme until at least the end of August.“The job of processing the applications already submitted can continue. But given that the scheme was not adequately publicised, and extension to the deadline might encourage more people to apply.”RURAL BROADBAND SCHEME NOT PROPERLY ADVERTISED, SAYS TD was last modified: July 27th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie McConaloguerural broadband schemelast_img read more

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first_imgA minibus bus driver has been found not guilty of causing the death of a Letterkenny mother-of-three Sheena Stewart.William McKee had been charged with driving without due care and attention in Ballyshannon on January 1st, 2015, following a legal submission, at Donegal Town Circuit Court. Mr McKee, of Carricknahorna, Cashelard, Ballyshannon, had pleaded not guilty to the charge.However, Judge John Aylmer ruled the 55-year-old man must be acquitted following a legal submission by Defence Counsel Colm Symth.Earlier in the trial, Mr McKee has said he thought he had run over a cardboard box when he had actually been involved in a collision with Ms Stewart.Judge Aylmer expressed his sympathy with the family of the late Ms Stewart for their loss.Mini-bus driver found not guilty of careless driving causing death of young mother was last modified: October 26th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ballyshannonbus drivercourtdonegalnot guiltylast_img read more

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first_imgDr Vanessa Naidoo’s passion for people and medicine has led to her leaving the comforts of home to provide much-needed medical care for vulnerable people in some of the world’s most dangerous placesGalvanised by the images of the injured in the 2011 Libyan uprising, Dr Vanessa Naidoo decided to put her passion for people and medicine to good use; she volunteered with international medical and humanitarian aid organisation, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Currently, she is in South Sudan, as the organisation responds to a cholera outbreak in the area.“My passions are medicine and people – this makes MSF a natural choice for me. I have always wanted to do something that would make a difference in the world, but I didn’t always know that aid work would be a feature on that pathway, but I am very glad that it is.”Naidoo says she heard about MSF while at university; “I had heard about MSF during my training at the University of Cape Town (UCT); they had helped to start the ARV roll-out in Khayelitsha while I was still a student. I filled out the online application shortly after I watched that news clip on Libya, and the rest, as they say, is history!”WORKING WITH MÉDECINS SANS FRONTIÈRESNaidoo is an anaesthetist, but her first stint with MSF was as part of a team setting up a maternity hospital in Afghanistan and supervising the operating theatre. She helped to train midwives, some of whom had never seen an operation before, to work in the operating theatre and assist with Caesarean sections.She has also worked as an emergency doctor in a refugee camp tent hospital in Sudan, treating cases of malnutrition, lower respiratory tract infections, and malaria, while struggling to contain a hepatitis e outbreak. In Syria, she worked as an anaesthetist and also handled most female consultations and delivered babies.Naidoo faces ethical dilemmas daily, one of which is to determine how far to go to save the premature babies who arrive at camps in a serious condition; “It’s a difficult situation to be in, and we do what we can within our means, remembering ‘first, do no harm’.“It’s very challenging working in an environment where patients arrive in poor physical condition, and you have minimal facilities to diagnose and treat them.  As doctors, we have to rely on our clinical skills to make diagnoses, and my South African training and community service experience has served me well in this regard.  As MSF, we are doing the best we can in these circumstances, but you always wish you could do more.”But, Naidoo says, there are few things better than seeing a child who was too weak to eat begin to play and smile again; “It might sound corny, but I earn my rewards in smiles.”SAVING LIVES AROUND THE WORLDWhile travelling the globe saving lives may sound romantic, Naidoo’s work has taken her to war zones in Afghanistan, Southern Sudan and Syria, and she has had to contend with exploding bombs and mines, and gunfire, while trying to care for some of the world’s most vulnerable people.Along with this, she has shared their daily hardships; extreme temperatures; deadly creatures; and substandard accommodation, but, she says, it is all worth it to see the faces of the people she works with; “It’s not easy, but it’s a privilege to be able to do a job you love, for people who need it most.“The harsh realities of ongoing war are plain to see in a trauma centre. Although we provide a high standard of healthcare, many injuries are so severe that there is little we can do to save patients, but knowing that we are making a difference and drawing attention to the plight of these refugees make the difficulties we experience worthwhile.”WHY I BECAME A DOCTORHaving always wanted to study medicine, Naidoo says she didn’t consider too many other options.“I have always had a natural interest in biology and a curious mind; I was one of those kids who dissected insects in the garden, and didn’t find it disgusting. As a child I spent a lot of time in the doctors’ rooms, and I always thought that it would feel good to know how to fix people and make them feel better, but I don’t think I really knew what the medical profession really involved until I was well on my way to becoming a doctor.“I began to have doubts about my choice in the first few years of medical school at UCT, but I had an experience in my first year that settled things in my mind. I was one of the first people to arrive at an accident scene with my uncle one night; the driver of the car was thrown from the vehicle and lying in a ditch on the side of the road – he was awake but injured and in pain, and I had no idea what to do. I hated that feeling of helplessness in the face of suffering, and that’s what drove me to complete my medical studies.”A LIFE IN MEDICAL SERVICEWhile at medical school Naidoo worked with the UCT-based Students’ Health and Welfare Centres Organisation, a student-run non-profit that provides healthcare and education services to poorer communities in the Cape Metropolitan area.Now, juggling aid work, and private and public healthcare, Naidoo says she loves being a doctor;“I love my job, because it never feels like a job. I enjoy working as part of a team with a systematic approach to solving problems and seeing results … even when you can’t help them, most people are just grateful that someone has tried.”However, as rewarding as her work is, Naidoo says it’s also emotionally demanding; “There are times when I feel my life is very ‘abnormal’. The more time I spend in the field, the less I can relate to the world I used to live in, and that’s hard sometimes. I have come to realise that in order to be effective in aid work, I need to have balance in my life. I need to take care of the relationships I have with friends and family back home, look after my health and take time to rest. I would like to get married and have a family someday, but I’m pretty sure I will always do work for MSF or some other humanitarian organisation – preferably in the field, but perhaps even in the office, developing policies and protocols if needed.“I have to remain strong and believe that we are making a difference.”Naidoo is currently completing a masters in philosophy in emergency medicine with UCT. The programme emphasises evidence-based medicine, which she believes is vital in aid work.“I know that to stay on the top of my game, I need to expose myself to medicine in all contexts. For example, on mission I lose some of the skills I have for interpreting sophisticated tests and investigations, so it’s good to get that practice when I come back home. I probably see myself working and teaching in the public health sector in South Africa in the long term, but I know I will always do missions as often as I can.”last_img read more

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first_img28 July 2014 Seven companies with committed investments totalling over R3-billion have projects under construction at the Coega industrial development zone in the Eastern Cape, providing contruction-related jobs to over 1 800 residents of Nelson Mandela Bay. “Construction expansion of existing businesses is sign of current investors’ business growth and an improving economic climate,” Coega Development Corporation spokesperson Ayanda Vilakazi said in a statement last week. Companies with projects under construction include a local-international consortium headed by French firm GDF Suez (a R2.2-billion investment), industrial gas companies Afrox (R300-million) and Air Products (R300-million), and logistics companies Vector Logistics (R140-million), Digistics Digital Logistics (R30-million), ID Logistics (R30- million) and UTi Distribution (R30-million). GDF Suez, along with Japanese company Mitsui and various local partners, is building the 335-megawatt (MW) Dedisa peaking power plant, one of the first large-scale non- renewable energy projects involving an independent power producer in South Africa. Vilakazi said that more than a third of the project had been completed so far, adding that the plant – besides generating roughly half of Nelson Mandela Bay’s power requirement – would “provide value added assistance to a number of growing industries established in the IDZ”. Afrox, meanwhile, is one track to complete its new air separation unit in the fourth quarter of this year. The 150-ton per day unit will produce a variety of industrial gases for the automotive, food processing and medical sectors, and will give Afrox direct access to customers throughout the province, where it has an established customer base. Air Products’ air separation unit is also on schedule, Vilakazi said, and is expected to be fully operational before the end of the year. In May, the Coega Development Corporation (CDC) reported that it had secured just over R1.8-billion in investments from 10 clients across a range of industries in 2013/14. Christopher Mashigo, business development executive at the CDC, said Coega was “becoming a springboard into the local and international retail sector, and talks to why we actually have industrial development zones in the first place”. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ag Data Space continues to be disruptive with long-standing and new companies coming to market with a variety of what is called digital platforms and tools.The term Big Data continues to be a term that garners attention in the press. Big Data itself can be defined as data whose scale, diversity, and complexity require new architecture, techniques, algorithms, and analytics to manage it and extract value and hidden knowledge from it. There are many descriptive terms to make up this definition, but simply consider Big Data as the aggregation of data then employing new analyses or queries to bring innovative learning. Big Data can exist with private (e.g. farm data), public (most notably government data such as USDA data layers), or a combination of both. The goal in agriculture is to use data to ultimately drive decisions and profitability at the farm.“Digital Agriculture” is the new term within agriculture having four components: precision agriculture, prescriptive agriculture, enterprise agriculture and big data. An important component here in Ohio is the progression of how precision agriculture technology will enable farmers, retailers and custom applicators to enhance nutrient management in regards to placement, timing and generation of new data layers for evaluating success. However, agriculture is just starting to embark on this evolution digital agriculture.The area of current growth is around prescriptive agriculture, where a farmer provides data to data service and in return receives recommendations, information and prescription (Rx) maps for inputs. Interests in Prescriptive Agriculture continues to grow here in Ohio where growers are beginning to understand the value of using data to evaluate practices and inputs while developing site-specific management (e.g. Rx).While prescriptive agriculture brings opportunities, it along with the Big Data focus these days can bring confusion to the value and what data services to use. In 2013, Auburn University published results of a survey asking growers to list “What are the needs related to data management at the farm level in order to make it more successful and valuable?” These results provide insight into what will make data use successful at the farm. In order of relevance, growers indicated the following for data success.1)    Automatic wireless data transfer2)    Help getting started in data management with local support and training3)    Simplified farm management information software with preference of web-based.4)    Quick start guides5)    Standardized data and compatibility between different brands.Additionally, it was noted that data tools and services need to be simple and personalized in order for them to be adopted and effectively used. These are good elements to keep in mind for the agriculture industry as we work through this evolution of digital agriculture. The availability of data tools for farmers and their agronomists continues to grow as evidence all the new APPs available. These tools will be become valuable to the grower and agronomists as the above five points are addressed. You can find more information about Precision / Prescriptive Agriculture at the Ohio State Precision Ag website (www.OhioStatePrecisionAg.com).last_img read more

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