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Go beyond marketing and serve Hispanic consumers

first_imgEvery year, National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) feels like a good moment for credit unions to consider how they might reach this growing market. It’s easy to see why: The Hispanic population topped 60 million in 2019, up 20% since 2010, according to 2019 population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. About one in five American consumers identifies as Hispanic. This is a vital and growing market.But this year, we’re proposing we take things a step further. We believe credit unions can look beyond marketing and think about how they actually serve Hispanic members. Hispanic American consumers need more than effective outreach and clever advertising. They need partners in their financial success.A Word About Our PerspectiveThanks to our work with CO-OP’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion council, we’re enthusiastic advocates for reaching out and meeting the needs of diverse communities. We believe there’s strength in diversity and the complex understanding that comes from multiple life experiences and perspectives in the workplace. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Avian flu deaths reported in Indonesia, China

first_imgJan 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A 22-year-old chicken seller in Indonesia died yesterday after testing positive for avian influenza, and a young Chinese woman whose case was reported previously also succumbed to the disease this week.The Indonesian man died after a week of hospitalization, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report quoting Ilham Patu of the Sulianti Saroso Hospital in Jakarta.Local testing showed he had the H5N1 avian flu virus, the story said. If his case is confirmed by tests at a Hong Kong lab accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO), he will be counted as the 15th Indonesian to die of avian flu.The Chinese victim was a 29-year-old woman from Chengdu City in the south-central province of Sichuan, the WHO reported on Jan 25. She became ill Jan 12 and died Jan 23. Some previous reports had listed her age as 36.She worked in a dry-goods shop and had no reported exposure to sick birds, the WHO said. Her case was the second one in China so far this year. The first case was also in Sichuan province but was about 150 kilometers from the latest one. No poultry outbreaks had been reported in the areas where the two patients lived, though one occurred elsewhere in the province in December.China has had 10 human cases of H5N1 avian flu, with 7 deaths, the WHO said. The cases began last November.In other news, Turkish health officials today said a British lab had confirmed 12 of the 21 human H5N1 cases reported in Turkey, according to an AFP report.On the basis of in-country tests, Turkey has had 21 human cases, including 4 deaths, all occurring this month. The WHO has mentioned those numbers in reports but has not yet added them to its case count, pending confirmation by outside labs. The agency currently lists a global total of 152 cases with 83 deaths.The Turkish health ministry said 14 H5N1 patients had recovered and been released from hospitals, while three were still being treated, according to AFP. “It is encouraging that there have been no new cases [since January 17], but precautions should continue,” the ministry was quoted as saying.The apparent mortality rate in Turkey so far is much lower than in East Asia, where it has been more than 50%. A United Nations official said today that scientists are studying whether this means the virus is becoming less deadly in humans, according to a Reuters report.”The question being asked is, ‘Are these people having a milder form of the disease and what does that mean?'” said David Nabarro, the UN’s coordinator for avian and pandemic flu. He made the comments at a meeting sponsored by the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.Nabarro said the lower death rate in Turkey does not mean a reduced risk of a pandemic. “It simply is telling us that the virus may be changing the way it interacts with humans. It does not tell us that the risk of a mutation that causes the pandemic is increasing or decreasing,” he told Reuters.At the same meeting in Davos, business mogul Richard Branson predicted that a flu pandemic could halt up to 70% of commercial air traffic, according to another Reuters report.”If it happens, an airline is going to have 50 percent of its planes grounded, maybe more—60, 70 percent,” he said. Branson is the founder of Virgin Atlantic Airways and other carriers, the story said.In other developments, a wild bird called a magpie robin was positive for an H5 virus in preliminary testing in Hong Kong, according to AFP. Another magpie robin in Hong Kong tested positive for an H5N1 virus last week.See also:Jan 25 WHO report on fatal human case in Chinahttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_01_25a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Nine-year-old is China’s 10th avian flu victim

first_imgMar 8, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – China reported today that a 9-year-old girl died 2 days ago of H5N1 avian influenza, becoming the country’s 10th person to succumb to the virus.The girl, whose case was announced Feb 27, lived in the eastern province of Zhejiang, the World Health Organization (WHO) said. She fell ill on Feb 10 and was in critical condition by the time her case was made public.China has had 15 confirmed human cases of avian flu. With the girl’s case, the global death toll has increased to 96 out of 175 cases, by the WHO’s count.The girl’s case, along with that of a 32-year-old man who died Mar 2, has prompted questions about how people are getting infected, according to a Reuters report published today.No bird outbreaks of H5N1 have been reported in Zhejiang in recent months, but the girl fell ill after visiting relatives in Anhui province who owned some chickens, some of which were sick, according to earlier reports.The 32-year-old victim was from Guangdong province and lived in an urban area with no reported bird outbreaks, Reuters reported. The story said he was believed to have been exposed to the virus at a poultry market.Zhong Nanshan, director of the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, suggested that both victims might have caught the virus from chickens that were carrying it asymptomatically, according to Reuters.Meanwhile, a top Chinese health official was quoted today as saying that China’s human victims of avian flu had “defective” immune systems. A Bloomberg News story said the comments by Wang Longde, vice minister of health, were reported by the Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post.Wang said the government had studied several cases, but he gave no details, according to the report. The Bloomberg story stated that Wang “said the victims had ‘defective’ immune systems and the general public shouldn’t panic.”However, published scientific reports have not pointed to weak immunity as a common risk factor in human cases. (See link to CIDRAP overview of avian influenza, below.)A WHO official, Aphaluck Bhatiasevi, told the Hong Kong newspaper there is no scientific evidence that infection is linked to immunity. She said cases have been associated with contact with birds, not strength or weakness.Also today, the WHO reported that a 3-day conference in Geneva produced progress on plans for responding quickly to early signs of a flu pandemic. In a news release, the agency said the operational plan “moved closer to final form” as the meeting of 70 public health experts ended today.The results of the meeting will be circulated for review and published as soon as they are ready, the WHO promised.See also:CIDRAP overview of avian influenza and its implications for human diseaselast_img read more

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Pandemic vaccine–making capacity rising, but still short

first_imgFeb 24, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The world’s capacity to produce vaccines for an influenza pandemic has risen sharply in the past 2 years, but it would still take an estimated 4 years to meet the global demand if a pandemic emerged now, according to a report from an international strategy consulting firm.The report was prepared by the New York City–based firm Oliver Wyman in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA).”Pandemic vaccine production capacity has increased by 300 percent over the last two years, largely driven by improvements in production yields and dosage-sparing technologies,” Oliver Wyman and the IFPMA stated in a news release. The company did not release the full report.If a pandemic emerged this year, the most likely case is that manufacturers could produce 2.5 billion doses in the first 12 months after they received the production strain, the firm said. It would take 4 years to produce enough to meet total global demand, meaning two doses for each of the world’s 6.7 billion people.In the best case, the industry could produce 7.7 billion doses in the first 12 months of a pandemic and could meet global demand in 1½ years, the firm said.The company predicts that annual pandemic vaccine production capacity will rise to somewhere between 5 billion and 14.5 billion doses over the next 5 years. That means the time needed to meet global demand could drop to 2½ years in the most likely case or 1 year in the best case.The firm also expects that surplus vaccine production capacity—above and beyond the demand for seasonal flu vaccine and prepandemic vaccine stockpiling—will increase over the next 5 years, to between 2.6 billion and 5.4 billion annual doses. How much the capacity actually rises is likely to depend on the demand for both seasonal and prepandemic vaccines, officials said.”I think this is a mixed story,” Adam Sabow, the Wyman partner who led the preparation of the report, told CIDRAP News. “This is good if there’s new seasonal [flu vaccine] demand or if there’s demand for H5N1 vaccine during the interpandemic period for efforts such as stockpiling.”However, if there isn’t demand, there’s a possibility that some of that capacity could be rationalized. By that we mean that capacity may either be shut down or may be redeployed for other purposes,” which would reduce the ability to respond quickly to a pandemic.He noted that there is some demand for H5N1 prepandemic vaccines, as some countries are stockpiling them, while the WHO is working on designing a global H5N1 vaccine stockpile. He said his firm is working with the WHO on that project.Alicia D. Greenidge, director-general of the IFPMA, said member companies are committed to working with the WHO and governments to ensure the best use of surplus vaccine capacity to prepare for a pandemic. “The findings suggest that the use of stockpiled H5N1-based vaccines, followed by pandemic vaccine as soon as these become available, offers a realistic strategy to address this significant threat,” she commented in the Wyman news release.Agreement on numbersSabow said that to estimate vaccine production capacity, his firm included 44 existing and planned vaccine production facilities, representing “the vast majority” of such facilities.He said the report marks a first: “This study is the first time that all the major actors have come together to agree on the capacity numbers for pandemic influenza. There’s historically been a debate about the numbers that has taken away from the policy discussion. We’re excited about this because the global health community has come together and agreed on the numbers and now can move on to the policy implications.”The report estimates that once a pandemic is recognized, it will take 4 months to develop, produce, and begin distributing a specific vaccine for it. Sabow said the estimate assumes the use of conventional egg-based production.”We worked very closely with the WHO and the manufacturers to break down the individual parameters of that lead time, and a lot of work has been done to make that lead time as short as possible,” he said. “This is currently the best information that our group has analyzed with regard to a realistic time at the point of a pandemic.”Egg-based and cell-based productionAlthough cell culture technology has been described as a faster and more flexible method for making flu vaccine, Sabow said the time needed to start making a pandemic vaccine would probably be about the same with cell culture production.”We did model this for both egg-based and cell-based production, and the expectation is that cell-based production would have a relatively similar time frame,” he said.While most flu vaccine production remains egg-based, the amount of cell-based production capacity is expected to increase considerably in the next 5 years, Sabow noted.One of the uncertainties is what will happen to egg-base production capacity as cell-based capacity comes on line, particularly if demand for seasonal and prepandemic vaccines is lacking. “If there isn’t demand, some of that egg-based capacity may be rationalized,” he said.A chart released by Wyman gives more specific estimates of how much vaccine could be produced in the first few months of a pandemic. It indicates that once a pandemic is declared, it will take 3 to 4 weeks to create a reference strain for vaccine production.In the most likely case, production would reach 340 million doses at 4 months after vaccine makers receive the reference strain, according to the chart. Production would reach 580 million doses at 5 months, 860 million doses at 6 months, and 2.45 billion doses at 12 months.Possible constraintsSabow said the Wyman analysis did not consider potential economic constraints on vaccine production and distribution or the possible effects of supply-chain disruptions, which many experts regard as likely during a pandemic.”The intent of our work was to say, based on the production capabilities of those facilities, what do we think the overall production looks like at the point of a pandemic,” he said. “We did not analyze what the financial implications would be or whether there would be funding for production or who would have access to it, and did not look at the possible supply-chain issues. That was not part of this analysis.”Sabow said the projections related to production of prepandemic vaccine stockpiling refer to H5N1 vaccines, but the estimates of production of actual pandemic vaccines do not assume that the next pandemic virus will be an H5N1 strain. “This is based on the history of producing a range of different influenza vaccine strains,” he said.See also: Oct 26, 2007, CIDRAP News report “The pandemic vaccine puzzle, part 2: Vaccine production capacity falls far short”last_img read more

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Liverpool offices

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​Luxembourg reserve fund names managers for €500m global property push

first_imgOverall, the fund has a 8.5% strategic allocation to property, but currently falls far short of its 5% domestic target and at the end of 2014 only had €247m in Luxembourgish real estate.A project that will see it approach its 5% target, the ’Cité de la sécurité sociale’, is currently under development, and will see the construction of an office complex to house the domestic social security office. The fund decided last year to build up its global exposure through holdings in real estate funds to further diversify its portfolio and increase exposure to inflation-linked assets.To date, the portfolio, which returned 10.96% last year, has largely been split between fixed income – accounting for nearly 60% of assets – and equities (38.4%). Luxembourg’s €14.3bn pension reserve fund has hired two managers to oversee its €500m push into global real estate.The Fonds de Compensation commun au régime général de pension (FDC) announced its board of directors had settled on Aviva Investors and CBRE Global Investment Partners as its inaugural managers, after first tendering the vacancies in August.Each manager will be handed €250m for an unlisted global real estate mandate, part of FDC’s attempt to meet its 3.5% strategic allocation to property outside the Grand Duchy.In addition to appointing Aviva Investors and CBRE, UBS Asset Management has been appointed as standby manager, should either of the two managers seeded need to be replaced.last_img read more

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MarCy17: A Long Way Ahead for Shipping to Gain Cyber Maturity

first_imgThe shipping industry should take protective measures to be ‘cyber mature’, particularly as personal, confidential and operational information is at risk, it was concluded at a panel discussion held in the framework of the Maritime Cyprus 2017 conference in Limassol. As explained, shipping constitutes a target for cyber attacks since a lot of information and money is at stake.“Cybersecurity sustainable investments should be materialiased and the level of cyber maturity should be continuously reinforced as the cybersecurity issue needs to be a continuous improvement process,” it was highlighted at the panel.What is more, panelists pointed out that cyber risk is here to stay for both companies and ships but cyber risk management is possible and achievable.On novel ship design, it was mentioned that newly designed ships have additional and innovative equipment on board that makes them more efficient. This equipment will lead to decreased air emissions from such new ships. The role of the shipowners during the design stage and of the classification societies during the building stage of new ships was also discussed.With regard to digitalization, it was emphasized that the industry needs to be ready to embrace its benefits and prepare for the threats it poses such as cyber security. The importance of preparing employees and crews for future technologies through training was stressed.Autonomous ships will become a reality but we should not expect to see unmanned ships for many years to come since seafarers on board cannot be replaced by vulnerable digital systems, according to the panelists.Panelists included Steffen Gau, Marine Business Development New Construction of Lloyd’s Register Marine and Offshore covering the discussion on novel ship designs, Cynthia Hudson, CEO of HudsonAnalytix covering the discussion on cyber security, and George Ward, Project Support Manager of ECDIS talking about digitalization.last_img read more

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Durban Container Terminal Deepening Project on the Way

first_imgAddressing stakeholders at a business breakfast in Durban earlier today, representatives of Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) provided a project update on the forthcoming Durban Container Terminal (DCT) Pier 2’s North Quay deepening project.As Transnet reported, the deeper berths will enable the Port of Durban to accommodate newer generation container vessels by 2023.The company’s Chief Capital Officer, Krishna Reddy, said that the R7 billion mega project would help to sustain the existing container operations at the Port of Durban, specifically DCT Berths 203 to 205.The contract for the multi-billion-rand Main Marine Construction Works package has been awarded to CMI Emtateni Joint Venture.According to Transnet, the marine infrastructure work will be executed in three successive phases – commencing with work on berth 205, followed by berth 204 and ending with berth 203. This staggered approach will ensure that the terminal is able to accommodate two vessels at any time between berths 203 to 205, even while one berth is decommissioned.The company also added that a new quay wall will be constructed 50m seawards of the existing quay wall, along Berths 203 to 205, which will provide sufficient water depth to safely accommodate larger Post Panamax vessels.The existing quay wall will be deepened from -12.8m to -16.5m Chart Datum Port (CDP) and lengthened from 914m to approximately 1 210m which will allow for the simultaneous berthing of three 350m long Post Panamax Vessels. These berths have been operating beyond their original water depth design specifications.last_img read more

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141 Speedway hosts history-making $10,000 to win Clash at the Creek for IMCA Modifieds June 20-21

first_imgFRANCIS CREEK, Wis. – A $10,000 top check is at stake when IMCA Modifieds travel to 141 Speedway for the history-making June 20 and 21 Clash at the Creek.The Clash doubles as the second installment of the Arnold Motor Supply Dirt Knights Tour and pays a minimum of $750 to start in the tour’s first-ever venture outside the State of Iowa.Ken Schrader joins the Modified field for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier.IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods race for $1,000 to win both nights at Francis Creek. IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Side Biter Chassis North Central Region and EQ Cylinder Heads Northern Region, and Wisconsin State points will be awarded.Pre-tech starts at noon and an open practice session runs from 6-9 p.m. on Tues­day, June 19. Dirt Kings Late Models are in town, pit passes are $25 and admission to the grandstand is $10 for adults.Clash qualifying for the Modifieds starts Wednesday, June 20.Pit gates open at 2 p.m. and racing starts at 6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. Wednesday grand­stand admission is $15 for adults and $10 for seniors and students; on Thursday, admission is $20 for adults and $15 for seniors and students. Kids 10 and under accompa­nying a paid adult get in free and pit passes are $30 each day. Three-day pit passes are $75.Entry fee for Modifieds is now $250 or $300 on race day.More infor­mation about the Clash at the Creek is available by calling 920 360-5925 and at the track website, www.141speedway.com.The Clash at the Creek will be broadcast by IMCA.TV.last_img read more

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Positive COVID-19 case at Lawrenceburg hospital

first_imgLAWRENCEBURG, Ind. – Highpoint Health has confirmed a patient tested positive for the novel coronavirus.  The hospital will not provide additional patient details in order to protect patient privacy.“Highpoint Health is taking every necessary precaution to keep our patients and community safe,” said Michael Schwebler, President/CEO of Highpoint Health. “We are here for the community but need everyone’s help and support as we work through this together. Please stay at home, practice social distancing, wash your hands, and cover your cough. I know you’ve heard all of this many times before, but following these guidelines are our best defense against COVID-19.” Those who have questions about the virus are encouraged to call Highpoint Health’s dedicated line, (812) 537-8210, which is staffed by highly-trained medical professionals.last_img read more

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