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Billy Elliot’s Kiril Kulish on Derek Hough’s DWTS Advice

first_img View Comments Congrats to newest members of the @DancingABC troupe – @dennisjauch, @kirilkulish, @shannonholtz #DWTS #DancingOnGMAhttps://t.co/k2ER1oT9kJ— Good Morning America (@GMA) March 8, 2016 Kiril Kulish(Photo courtesy of Beata Mandell/Fifth Avenue Management)center_img Kiril Kulish is all grown up and heading to primetime. The Billy Elliot title role Tony winner has announced that he will take the small screen as a member of Dancing with the Stars’ dance troupe. But that hardly means he would not “Shine” on the Great White Way again if given the chance.“That is actually a big dream of mine, to choreograph [for Broadway],” Kulish told Broadway.com. “Ever since I’ve been dancing, I never really let other people choreograph for me. I always want to take control. I definitely would love to choreograph a new show on Broadway one day or absolutely be a part of one [again] too.”Lucky for the “Born to Boogie” boy, he will have the opportunity to choreograph on DWTS. “We of course are in a lot of the dancers’ numbers with the celebrities,” Kulish told us. “We get to be on the creative end a bit.” In fact, Kulish was tapped for the ABC series’ kid-version at age 13. However, he was already under contract with Billy Elliot, which would go on to win ten Tony Awards, including one for Best Musical.As for Dancing with the Stars vets Kulish looks up to, he told Broadway.com, “I can definitely relate to [Derek Hough] because he’s very versatile. Derek is a good guy. He told me to just enjoy it.” Triple threat Derek Hough has taken home the DWTS trophy six times and is Broadway-bound for producer Harvey Weinstein’s Singin’ in the Rain revival. Perhaps Kulish will follow in Hough’s fancy footsteps and take another Broadway bow? We certainly think it’d be electric.ABC’s Dancing with the Stars kicks off season 22 on March 21. In the meantime, get psyched watching Kulish bust a move below!last_img read more

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Georgia farm outlook.

first_imgUGA peanut economist Nathan Smith said Georgia farmers’ 2003 peanut crop will be their second under the new farm bill, which ended the way they had long marketed their peanuts. Under previous farm bills, the government had regulated the U.S. peanut supply through a quota system.To get better-than-average prices in 2003, peanut growers will have to watch the market closely. Like cotton, peanut prices are now very susceptible to supply-and-demand. And right now, this isn’t working in peanut farmers’ favor.The 2001 crop was the second-largest ever, creating an oversupply of peanuts going into 2002. To get rid of these extra peanuts, farmers need access to foreign markets or a huge increase in consumer demand.The U.S. Department of Agriculture expects U.S. citizens to eat about 4.5 percent more peanuts this year. The industry view is that lower peanut prices will increase consumption.Lower farm prices for peanuts could mean slightly lower prices for peanut butter and for candy and snacks containing peanuts. It may be more likely, though, that manufacturers will spend more on advertisements and promotions instead of lowering prices.The 2002 U.S. peanut crop wasn’t a good one. This drop in supply could mean higher prices for farmers in the future.Lively stockLivestock and poultry account for 51 percent of Georgia’s total farm income. In 2002, there was a large supply of poultry and red meat. This suppressed farm prices. But domestic demand remained strong, and prices weren’t as bad as they could have been.In 2003, poultry growers can expect slightly higher prices, said John McKissick, a UGA livestock economist. But an oversupply of eggs will continue to hurt egg prices.U.S. beef production is expected to total 25.95 billion pounds, down from 27 billion in 2002. This lower supply will increase prices for farmers. Beef demand is expected to remain strong.Tobacco uncertainThe tobacco industry still faces uncertainty. Tobacco remains under a federal quota-based system. But changes in the industry and the mood in Washington toward quota-based farm policies point to a potential quota buyout.Growers seem willing to give up the security of government price supports for greater freedom in deciding how much to grow and in selling directly to tobacco companies.The 2003 flue-cured quota, announced Dec. 15, will be 526.4 million pounds, or 9.6 percent less than in 2002 and 40 percent less than in 1997.With the lower production, most growers have gotten prices above the government support price. In 2002, 95 percent of Georgia tobacco was contracted directly with tobacco companies.Agriculture is Georgia’s No. 1 industry, generating $8.7 billion of the state’s $400 billion annual economy. Including the businesses directly and indirectly affected, farming contributes $41 billion of state economy.For a copy of the 2003 Georgia outlook guide, call your UGA Extension Service county office. Georgia farmers should see better prices for what they produce next year, according to a University of Georgia study.The 2003 Farm Outlook and Planning Guide, published by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will be released in mid-January.Cotton comeback?Supply-and-demand seems to favor cotton farmers, said Don Shurley, a UGA cotton economist with the CAES agricultural and applied economics department.In 2002, the world grew 87.4 million bales of cotton, or 11 percent fewer than in 2001. A bale of cotton is 450 pounds of lint. Production declined in the major cotton-producing countries: China, India, Australia and the United States.While the world supply is lower, the demand for cotton is expected to rise next year to about 96.4 million bales, up 2.4 percent from 2001.”At this juncture, the 2003 cotton price outlook is encouraging,” Shurley said.Peanut marketinglast_img read more

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Vermont’s Camp Johnson wins Army award

first_imgArmy programs making strides in endangered species protection, historic preservation, waste reduction, environmental restoration, sustainability, and pollution prevention earned Pentagon recognition in January as the Department of the Army announced the winners of its highest honors for environmental stewardship and sustainability.Seven installations, three teams, and one individual will receive Secretary of the Army Awards for their environmental and sustainability program achievements. This year’s winning accomplishments include: designing a multi-phase ethnographic oral history collection project, achieving significant waste and emissions reductions, securing special legislation that returns state timber revenues to the Army, construction of a photovoltaic array to reduce dependence on fossil fuel, and implementing performance-based contracting to save the Army millions of dollars in cleanup costs.”The Army is committed to protecting the environment at installations here and overseas,” said Tad Davis, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for the Environment, Safety and Occupational Health. “In fact, as the winners of our environmental awards demonstrate, the Army is getting more and more sophisticated in its use of environmental technology and sustainable practices. We’re becoming a greener shade of green.”The winners of this year’s environmental awards stand out as examples of how environmental stewardship and sustainability plays a crucial role in the Army’s readiness mission. Investments the Army makes in environmental programs and sustainability initiatives pay dividends in sustaining realistic training and testing capabilities both now and in the future.The winners of the FY 2008 Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards are:Camp Johnson, Vermont Army National Guard — Environmental Quality, Industrial InstallationU.S. Army Garrison Bamberg, Germany — Environmental Quality, Overseas InstallationCamp Navajo, Arizona Army National Guard — Cultural Resources Management, InstallationFort Bragg, N.C. — Environmental Restoration, InstallationCamp Ripley Maneuver and Training Center, Minnesota Army National Guard — Natural Resources Conservation, Large InstallationCombined Support Maintenance Shop, Michigan Army National Guard — Pollution Prevention, Non-industrial InstallationFort Hood, Texas — Sustainability, InstallationField Maintenance Shop #2 Pollution Prevention Team, North Carolina Army National Guard — Pollution Prevention, TeamFort Carson, Colo. — Sustainability, TeamFort Drum, N.Y. — Cultural Resources Management, Team/IndividualMajor Laura McHugh, Pennsylvania Army National Guard — Sustainability, IndividualThe Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards represent the highest honor in the field of environmental science and sustainability conferred by the Army. Many of these award winners will compete for the Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards this year.For details about the fiscal year 2008 Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards recipients visit the U.S. Army Environmental Command’s Web site at http://aec.army.mil/usaec/newsroom/awards00.html(link is external).”Sustaining the Environment for a Secure Future”For more information on the U.S. Army Environmental Command, visit http://aec.army.mil(link is external)SOURCE U.S. Army Environmental Command. ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md., Feb. 10 /PRNewswire/last_img read more

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New food options at HSC

first_imgThe Seaver Plaza Food Court on the Health Sciences Campus opened last week after four months of construction, which had led HSC students and visitors to seek other dining options such as food trucks, students said.Options galore · Students and visitors at the Health Sciences Campus can now dine at the newly renovated Seaver Plaza, which holds a Starbucks, Panda Express, Poquito Mas and the Marketplace. – Dieuwertje Kast | Daily Trojan “Before this opened, there were only food trucks or the hospital cafeteria,” said Calvin Cha, a first-year graduate student studying pharmacy. “I was pretty excited about the renovation when I heard that we were getting Panda [Express].”In addition to Panda Express, the food court now offers Starbucks, Poquito Mas and the Marketplace, which stocks convenience goods and snacks such as fruit and sandwiches.According to Kris Klinger, director of USC Hospitality, the decision to add these restaurants was to offer more and better choices for dining.“In the past there were no branded concepts. There were not a lot of good options. Now we have better options than we had in the past,” Klinger said.Phil Turner, assistant manager of the Starbucks in Seaver Plaza, said he is impressed with the increased quality that customers can expect from the renovated food court.“I think the brand standards really promote a more consistent dining experience,” Turner said. “The biggest changes are the updated recipes and product selection.”For hospital staff, faculty and students who frequent the food court, these healthier options are welcome, they said. Still, students without cars, like Cha, said they feel limited.“Honestly, it’s one of the only places to eat at this school. There’s nothing within walking distance [of HSC],” Cha said.HSC plans to celebrate the food court’s opening in the coming weeks.Compared to the old Seaver Food Court and limited options students had before students said, this Seaver Food court is much improved.“This is a pretty good place to eat,” said Kei-Cheuk Ng, a graduate student studying pharmacy.last_img read more

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