Tag: 夜上海论坛KK

Wolf Administration Continues Implementation of Methane Reduction Strategy by Releasing New Natural Gas Permits to Reduce Air Pollution

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Energy,  Environment,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Secretary Patrick McDonnell today announced the issuance of new general permits for unconventional natural gas wells and compression, processing, and transmission facilities that will reduce air pollution and establish a control threshold on methane emissions.“These permits represent the first step of my Methane Reduction Strategy and my administration’s continuing commitment to cleaner, healthier air across the commonwealth,” said Governor Wolf. “Cleaner air means healthier communities – for our citizens, and especially for our children. These new permits are one example of a way that we can have positive economic development without compromising public health. These permits are a win-win, helping industry control methane emissions that cost them money, while also helping defend our children and keep our communities healthier through cleaner air.  We’ve arrived at these permits through a comprehensive process that included feedback and input from both industry and the environmental community, and I am proud of the finished product that we are unveiling today.”Methane, the primary component of natural gas, has been identified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the second-most prevalent greenhouse gas emitted in the United States from human activities.“Pennsylvania is the second-largest producer of natural gas in the nation behind Texas,” said Governor Wolf. “We are uniquely positioned to be a national leader in addressing climate change while supporting and ensuring responsible energy development, while protecting public health and our environment.“These permits incorporate the most current state and federal regulations for controlling air pollution,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “The permits for new unconventional natural gas wells and new compression, processing and transmission stations along pipelines are some of the first in the nation to comprehensively address methane emissions from all equipment and processes, and they also address other types of air pollution that contribute to poor air quality.”The newly revised general permits, GP-5 and GP-5A, will be required for new compression, processing and transmission stations along pipelines, and new natural gas wells, respectively.In addition to the methane controls, the permits also set thresholds on other types of air pollution, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Operators will be required to meet federal new source standards and state Best Available Technology (BAT) included in the permit conditions for equipment and processes to control pollution emissions.“Reducing air pollution from gas wells and compression, processing and transmission facilities is key to responsibly developing Pennsylvania’s natural gas resources,” said McDonnell. “Everything we can do to reduce air pollution will improve public health.”DEP held multiple comment periods on the permits, which attracted more than 9,000 comments in total. The permits will go into effect on August 8, 2018.More information about the new permits can be found at http://www.dep.pa.gov/Business/Air/Pages/Methane-Reduction-Strategy.aspx June 07, 2018center_img Wolf Administration Continues Implementation of Methane Reduction Strategy by Releasing New Natural Gas Permits to Reduce Air Pollutionlast_img read more

Read More

Swans play down investment reports

first_imgSwansea have played down reports of potential foreign investment coming in to the club – but admit they are looking at possible overseas sponsorship avenues. Press Association The Barclays Premier League club denied takeover speculation surrounding them after reports said they are t alking to possible investors from the United States, Russia and Asia. A club spokesman told the Press Association that preliminary talks were designed to increase commercial investment and revenue streams. center_img Swansea chairman Huw Jenkins said in September that Swansea were “miles behind” most of their rivals in terms of commercial income. “One of the big things we need to do if we are to develop as a club, and try our best to compete with the best teams, is find a way of growing commercially,” Jenkins told the South Wales Evening Post. ” At the moment, the income levels we have are basically just linked to the football side of things – television revenue and that sort of thing. “The only other way we have got to bring money in is trading players. “They are the only tools we can use to make money, so the commercial aspect is something we have to look at. “We have to find ways of bringing in extra income. It’s difficult for a club like us down in south Wales to do that, but we have got to find a way of attracting big money and big sponsors from around the world.” Swansea – who were playing in the fourth tier of English football 10 years ago – currently sit fifth in the Premier League table, six points behind leaders Chelsea. last_img read more

Read More

Daryl Gross discusses decision to step down as director of athletics, future role at Syracuse

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Daryl Gross thinks it’s a great time for Syracuse University’s athletic department to go in a new direction, he said in an interview Friday with The Daily Orange.Gross stepped down as director of athletics Wednesday after 10 years in the role. He will now serve as vice president and special assistant to the chancellor, and will also teach sport management as an adjunct professor in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. In his time as athletic director, SU moved from the Big East to the Atlantic Coast Conference and had success in Olympic sports. The school was also the subject of a nearly eight-year NCAA investigation, the results of which were released in the Committee on Infractions’ report on March 6.Gross said the decision to step down wasn’t to avoid the report, but he added that the timing “plays into it brilliantly.”“It wasn’t like because there’s an NCAA problem I’m going to step aside. That’s not the reason,” Gross said. “But the noise that comes from that, there’s no reason for us to have any negativity for this program because it’s too good of a program.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“And for me, I feel like this would be a great time to let that noise just get behind us and go a new direction.”He added that the typical tenure for an athletic director is about four and a half or five years at one place. In his 10 years on the job, Gross said the athletic department got a lot done, and that he’s happy with what the department was able to accomplish. But, he said, it’s time to give the athletic department a fresh perspective, and to bring in someone with new ideas and a different philosophy.“And there’s nothing wrong with that,” Gross said. “This gives the athletic department a chance to get a different lens on it.”In Gross’s new role, he said he will focus on marketing and branding, which are his areas of expertise. In addition, he’ll teach sport management in Falk, where he said he’s excited to be able to share his experiences.In describing his transition from director of athletics to professor and special assistant, Gross used a sports analogy.“It’s like being in a NASCAR flying around the track race after race after race and trying to win at everything and off the field,” he said. “Now I can be part of the pit crew and try and help it from the outside and help the institution.” Comments Published on March 20, 2015 at 4:57 pm Contact Brett: blsamuel@syr.edu | @Brett_Samuels27last_img read more

Read More

Driver speaks to students

first_imgAt a small gathering of auto enthusiasts in Waite Phillips Hall, Amir Rosenbaum, one of 12 people to break the 400 mph land speed barrier, spoke about his experience building and driving racecars. The event was hosted by the USC Auto Club.Fast and Furious · Land-speed race record-holder Amir Rosenbaum met with students Tuesday night to discuss his racing career and his experiences in the auto industry in Waite Phillips Hall. – Liliana Scarlet Sedano | Daily Trojan “It’s good to be passionate about something, it makes you a better person,” Rosenbaum said. “But if you’re passionate about cars, that’s even better.”Rosenbaum’s interest in cars started early; he began making car sounds and saying car names at 9-months-old. He waited until his 16th birthday to get his license, but got his first speeding ticket at noon on the same day.“At one point, I had 13 speeding tickets in a 37-month period,” Rosenbaum said. “I lost my license. I still drove.”After holding a series of odd jobs including amateur gold mining, Rosenbaum eventually founded an auto parts company, Spectre Performance, that is now a multimillion-dollar business selling parts to auto enthusiasts.Rosenbaum began his racing career at the Virginia City Hillclimb in Nevada, a two-lane mountain road where he set the all-time record in 2002 in a Ferrari F-40. He then set his sights on a land speed record, but after realizing he couldn’t do it in the F-40, he decided to build a new car. He ended up using a modified “streamliner,” a 39-foot long vehicle just wide enough to fit the driver, with a 1970 Cadillac big-block engine bought from a junkyard for $100.“Air behaves differently at supersonic versus subsonic speed,” he said. “Most people think they need to build their car like a jet-fighter, but we decided to stick with the traditional Boeing                               model — more like a raindrop.”Rosenbaum also spoke about what it was like to drive at over 400 mph and said that at that speed the conscious brain can’t function. Rosenbaum ended up having to rely on a series of LED lights to tell him when to shift gears.“Some of the older guys told me that I wouldn’t be able to count to four that fast,” he said. “I didn’t believe them, but it’s true; at that speed you can’t count.”Rosenbaum said that the conscious brain takes in three degrees of the 180 degrees in a normal human field of vision while the subconscious brain handles the rest. He used the example of being able to glance at a text while driving on the highway and not losing control of the vehicle, or how time can sometimes seem to pass more slowly when humans sleep. He said that people should be aware of the power of the subconscious brain and utilize it in their daily lives.“The job of the conscious brain is to tell the subconscious brain what to do,” he said. “All athletes and other high-performing individuals work this way.”Students responded to the event enthusiastically and found the anecdotes Rosenbaum shared engaging and informative.“It’s almost indicative of a different era, how he grew up versus how we grew up,” said John Hu, a junior majoring in economics. “I wonder if we can even do the things that he did.”Aaron Bajor, president and founder of the USC Auto Club, said it was an honor to host a speaker such as Rosenbaum and said he hoped it would increase awareness about the club, which has grown to almost 200 members.“USC is a great school, but there aren’t a lot of opportunities for people interested in the automotive field,” said Tyler Makin, a senior majoring in business administration. “It’s great to see those horizons expanding.”last_img read more

Read More