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Vermont’s Camp Johnson wins Army award

first_imgArmy programs making strides in endangered species protection, historic preservation, waste reduction, environmental restoration, sustainability, and pollution prevention earned Pentagon recognition in January as the Department of the Army announced the winners of its highest honors for environmental stewardship and sustainability.Seven installations, three teams, and one individual will receive Secretary of the Army Awards for their environmental and sustainability program achievements. This year’s winning accomplishments include: designing a multi-phase ethnographic oral history collection project, achieving significant waste and emissions reductions, securing special legislation that returns state timber revenues to the Army, construction of a photovoltaic array to reduce dependence on fossil fuel, and implementing performance-based contracting to save the Army millions of dollars in cleanup costs.”The Army is committed to protecting the environment at installations here and overseas,” said Tad Davis, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for the Environment, Safety and Occupational Health. “In fact, as the winners of our environmental awards demonstrate, the Army is getting more and more sophisticated in its use of environmental technology and sustainable practices. We’re becoming a greener shade of green.”The winners of this year’s environmental awards stand out as examples of how environmental stewardship and sustainability plays a crucial role in the Army’s readiness mission. Investments the Army makes in environmental programs and sustainability initiatives pay dividends in sustaining realistic training and testing capabilities both now and in the future.The winners of the FY 2008 Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards are:Camp Johnson, Vermont Army National Guard — Environmental Quality, Industrial InstallationU.S. Army Garrison Bamberg, Germany — Environmental Quality, Overseas InstallationCamp Navajo, Arizona Army National Guard — Cultural Resources Management, InstallationFort Bragg, N.C. — Environmental Restoration, InstallationCamp Ripley Maneuver and Training Center, Minnesota Army National Guard — Natural Resources Conservation, Large InstallationCombined Support Maintenance Shop, Michigan Army National Guard — Pollution Prevention, Non-industrial InstallationFort Hood, Texas — Sustainability, InstallationField Maintenance Shop #2 Pollution Prevention Team, North Carolina Army National Guard — Pollution Prevention, TeamFort Carson, Colo. — Sustainability, TeamFort Drum, N.Y. — Cultural Resources Management, Team/IndividualMajor Laura McHugh, Pennsylvania Army National Guard — Sustainability, IndividualThe Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards represent the highest honor in the field of environmental science and sustainability conferred by the Army. Many of these award winners will compete for the Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards this year.For details about the fiscal year 2008 Secretary of the Army Environmental Awards recipients visit the U.S. Army Environmental Command’s Web site at http://aec.army.mil/usaec/newsroom/awards00.html(link is external).”Sustaining the Environment for a Secure Future”For more information on the U.S. Army Environmental Command, visit http://aec.army.mil(link is external)SOURCE U.S. Army Environmental Command. ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md., Feb. 10 /PRNewswire/last_img read more

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Army Scientists Striving to Develop Ebola Vaccine

first_img“Probably the most important thing we can do at this time,” he added, “is to provide some sort of treatment option or vaccine to health care workers who are risking their lives, so they can pass that along in the health care they are providing.” Human testing to evaluate safety of VSV-EBOV is underway at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, or NIAID, are conducting an early phase trial to evaluate the VSV-ZEBOV candidate for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who receive two intramuscular doses. During an interview last week, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, known as USAMRIID, scientists described their vaccine and drug-development research, development processes and products in development for the Ebola virus, and other infectious diseases. The problem, he added, is that each component in the trivalent vaccine has to go through its own set of clinical trials and FDA approvals for use in people, and that takes time. Dr. John M. Dye Jr., chief in USAMRIID’s Viral Immunology Branch, said dozens of vaccine candidates are being created worldwide, “especially with this outbreak and all of them have to go through an FDA (Food and Drug Administration) regulatory pathway.” USAMRIID is taking the most advanced vaccines forward as quickly as possible, to try to stem the Ebola outbreak, he added. In early stage clinical trials, again designed to assess vaccine safety and immune response, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of NIH, will test two versions of the NIAID/GlaxoSmithKline vaccine. One is a bivalent, or two-component, version containing genetic material from Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan. The other is a monovalent, or single-component, version that contains only genetic material from Ebola Zaire. Other species, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, include Sudan virus, Tai Forest virus and Bundibugyo virus. The fifth, Reston virus, has caused disease in monkeys, but not in people. Dr. John M. Dye Jr., chief in USAMRIID’s Viral Immunology Branch, said dozens of vaccine candidates are being created worldwide, “especially with this outbreak and all of them have to go through an FDA (Food and Drug Administration) regulatory pathway.” USAMRIID is taking the most advanced vaccines forward as quickly as possible, to try to stem the Ebola outbreak, he added. “If we do have experimental therapeutics and vaccines that could help,” Dr. Dye said, “it’s going to give some peace of mind to those who are going into [affected] countries” to treat patients. “Pretty much every vaccine that is currently being assessed for FDA approval has been through USAMRIID at one point or another,” Dr. Dye said. Meeting attendees came to consensus on the following points: At the same time, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research is testing the vaccine candidate as a single dose at its Clinical Trials Center in Silver Spring, Maryland, NIH officials said. During an interview last week, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, known as USAMRIID, scientists described their vaccine and drug-development research, development processes and products in development for the Ebola virus, and other infectious diseases. Dr. Dye, who has worked at USAMRIID for a decade, said that over the past 10 years, scientists there have made great advances in vaccines and therapeutics. The problem, he added, is that each component in the trivalent vaccine has to go through its own set of clinical trials and FDA approvals for use in people, and that takes time. “This outbreak is [Ebola] Zaire and, honestly, we were lucky it was Zaire,” Dr. Dye said, “because we have the most information and the most therapeutic options and the most vaccine work for Zaire. It’s the one we’ve been working on the longest.” In a statement on its website, the World Health Organization said the two Ebola vaccine candidates in clinical trials also will be tested soon in clinical trials in Africa and Europe. The WHO statement added that officials will work with all stakeholders to accelerate the vaccines’ development and safe use in countries with outbreaks. “The vaccines we’ve been working with here all express one particular protein of the virus, and many of these vaccines have been shown to be 100 percent [effective] in nonhuman primates, or monkey studies,” the viral immunology branch chief said. One vaccine candidate in clinical trials is based on recombinant, or genetically engineered, virus from an animal disease called vesicular stomatitis. An Ebola virus protein is modified into a vesicular stomatitis virus, and that virus acts as a vector, or carrier, to deliver the Ebola protein into the human body. The vaccine is called VSV-EBOV. Most of the vaccine candidates target Ebola Zaire, one of five species of Ebola virus, and the one that’s now causing the West Africa outbreaks. Clinical studies WHO reported that as of Oct. 23, along with more than 10,000 confirmed and suspected cases of Ebola virus disease and nearly 5,000 deaths, at least 450 health care workers have been infected with Ebola virus disease, and 244 have died. It’s important for USAMRIID to keep working on vaccines for all the filoviruses, Dr. Dye said, “because we don’t know what the next outbreak is going to be, but it’s important to realize that just because we have a response against Zaire doesn’t mean we’ve covered everything that we need to.” — Pharmaceutical companies developing the vaccines committed to ramping up production capacity for millions of doses to be available in 2015, with several hundred thousand ready before mid-2015. In a statement on its website, the World Health Organization said the two Ebola vaccine candidates in clinical trials also will be tested soon in clinical trials in Africa and Europe. The WHO statement added that officials will work with all stakeholders to accelerate the vaccines’ development and safe use in countries with outbreaks. Dr. Travis K. Warren, principal investigator in the Division of Molecular and Translational Sciences, said, “the response we’re generating for Ebola virus is also going to contribute to the efforts for Marburg virus, Sudan virus [and] for these broad-spectrum viruses, because we will begin to develop the drug product, the supply of the drug product and the safety information that will be applicable to many different programs.” WASHINGTON – No vaccines or drugs are available yet to protect people worldwide against Ebola Virus Disease, but two potential vaccines are in human safety testing, and scientists at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases were a critical part of their development. In their medical countermeasures work, USAMRIID scientists already had created a trivalent vaccine — one that contains three components. They are Ebola Zaire, Sudan virus and Marburg virus — another highly lethal virus that’s in the same filovirus group as Ebola. Dr. Travis K. Warren, principal investigator in the Division of Molecular and Translational Sciences, said, “the response we’re generating for Ebola virus is also going to contribute to the efforts for Marburg virus, Sudan virus [and] for these broad-spectrum viruses, because we will begin to develop the drug product, the supply of the drug product and the safety information that will be applicable to many different programs.” In their medical countermeasures work, USAMRIID scientists already had created a trivalent vaccine — one that contains three components. They are Ebola Zaire, Sudan virus and Marburg virus — another highly lethal virus that’s in the same filovirus group as Ebola. Human testing underway In early stage clinical trials, again designed to assess vaccine safety and immune response, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of NIH, will test two versions of the NIAID/GlaxoSmithKline vaccine. One is a bivalent, or two-component, version containing genetic material from Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan. The other is a monovalent, or single-component, version that contains only genetic material from Ebola Zaire. — Pharmaceutical companies developing the vaccines committed to ramping up production capacity for millions of doses to be available in 2015, with several hundred thousand ready before mid-2015. “The vaccines we’ve been working with here all express one particular protein of the virus, and many of these vaccines have been shown to be 100 percent [effective] in nonhuman primates, or monkey studies,” the viral immunology branch chief said. — Regulatory authorities in countries where the vaccines are manufactured and in Africa committed to supporting this goal by working under extremely short deadlines. USAMRIID, based in Frederick, Maryland, has pioneered research since 1969, to develop medical countermeasures for warfighters against deadly pathogens they might encounter as bioweapons on the battlefield. But lately, its work has gained a more immediate use as a medical tool for ensuring global public health security. USAMRIID has worked with the two Ebola vaccines now in clinical trials at the National Institutes of Health and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and many others over the years, he added. WHO convened an Oct. 24 meeting in Geneva, with high-ranking government representatives from Ebola-affected countries and development partners, civil society, regulatory agencies, vaccine manufacturers and funding agencies to decide how to fast-track testing and deployment of vaccines in enough numbers to affect the Ebola epidemic. Meeting attendees came to consensus on the following points: — Results from phase 1 clinical trials of the most advanced vaccines are expected to be available in December, and efficacy trials in affected countries will begin in the same timeframe. The other vaccine in clinical trials is a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus, or cold virus. An Ebola virus protein is engineered into a chimpanzee adenovirus to deliver the vaccine, called ChAd-EBOV, into people. At the same time, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research is testing the vaccine candidate as a single dose at its Clinical Trials Center in Silver Spring, Maryland, NIH officials said. WHO convened an Oct. 24 meeting in Geneva, with high-ranking government representatives from Ebola-affected countries and development partners, civil society, regulatory agencies, vaccine manufacturers and funding agencies to decide how to fast-track testing and deployment of vaccines in enough numbers to affect the Ebola epidemic. WASHINGTON – No vaccines or drugs are available yet to protect people worldwide against Ebola Virus Disease, but two potential vaccines are in human safety testing, and scientists at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases were a critical part of their development. USAMRIID has worked with the two Ebola vaccines now in clinical trials at the National Institutes of Health and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and many others over the years, he added. USAMRIID, based in Frederick, Maryland, has pioneered research since 1969, to develop medical countermeasures for warfighters against deadly pathogens they might encounter as bioweapons on the battlefield. But lately, its work has gained a more immediate use as a medical tool for ensuring global public health security. The trivalent vaccine is still going forward, Dye said, but a vaccine for Ebola Zaire was spun off in a separate program, “where they’re taking just the Zaire forward and then we’re continuing work on the trivalent cocktail — Zaire, Sudan and Marburg — with the idea that eventually we’re going to have to cover all those bases.” The other vaccine in clinical trials is a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus, or cold virus. An Ebola virus protein is engineered into a chimpanzee adenovirus to deliver the vaccine, called ChAd-EBOV, into people. “This outbreak is [Ebola] Zaire and, honestly, we were lucky it was Zaire,” Dr. Dye said, “because we have the most information and the most therapeutic options and the most vaccine work for Zaire. It’s the one we’ve been working on the longest.” Human testing underway Other species, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, include Sudan virus, Tai Forest virus and Bundibugyo virus. The fifth, Reston virus, has caused disease in monkeys, but not in people. By Dialogo November 03, 2014 Dr. Dye, who has worked at USAMRIID for a decade, said that over the past 10 years, scientists there have made great advances in vaccines and therapeutics. One vaccine candidate in clinical trials is based on recombinant, or genetically engineered, virus from an animal disease called vesicular stomatitis. An Ebola virus protein is modified into a vesicular stomatitis virus, and that virus acts as a vector, or carrier, to deliver the Ebola protein into the human body. The vaccine is called VSV-EBOV. It’s important for USAMRIID to keep working on vaccines for all the filoviruses, Dr. Dye said, “because we don’t know what the next outbreak is going to be, but it’s important to realize that just because we have a response against Zaire doesn’t mean we’ve covered everything that we need to.” Most of the vaccine candidates target Ebola Zaire, one of five species of Ebola virus, and the one that’s now causing the West Africa outbreaks. The trivalent vaccine is still going forward, Dye said, but a vaccine for Ebola Zaire was spun off in a separate program, “where they’re taking just the Zaire forward and then we’re continuing work on the trivalent cocktail — Zaire, Sudan and Marburg — with the idea that eventually we’re going to have to cover all those bases.” Human testing to evaluate safety of VSV-EBOV is underway at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, or NIAID, are conducting an early phase trial to evaluate the VSV-ZEBOV candidate for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who receive two intramuscular doses. — Regulatory authorities in countries where the vaccines are manufactured and in Africa committed to supporting this goal by working under extremely short deadlines. — Results from phase 1 clinical trials of the most advanced vaccines are expected to be available in December, and efficacy trials in affected countries will begin in the same timeframe. WHO reported that as of Oct. 23, along with more than 10,000 confirmed and suspected cases of Ebola virus disease and nearly 5,000 deaths, at least 450 health care workers have been infected with Ebola virus disease, and 244 have died. Clinical studies “Pretty much every vaccine that is currently being assessed for FDA approval has been through USAMRIID at one point or another,” Dr. Dye said. “If we do have experimental therapeutics and vaccines that could help,” Dr. Dye said, “it’s going to give some peace of mind to those who are going into [affected] countries” to treat patients. “Probably the most important thing we can do at this time,” he added, “is to provide some sort of treatment option or vaccine to health care workers who are risking their lives, so they can pass that along in the health care they are providing.” I LIKE THIS NEWS ITEMlast_img read more

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Go beyond marketing and serve Hispanic consumers

first_imgEvery year, National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) feels like a good moment for credit unions to consider how they might reach this growing market. It’s easy to see why: The Hispanic population topped 60 million in 2019, up 20% since 2010, according to 2019 population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. About one in five American consumers identifies as Hispanic. This is a vital and growing market.But this year, we’re proposing we take things a step further. We believe credit unions can look beyond marketing and think about how they actually serve Hispanic members. Hispanic American consumers need more than effective outreach and clever advertising. They need partners in their financial success.A Word About Our PerspectiveThanks to our work with CO-OP’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion council, we’re enthusiastic advocates for reaching out and meeting the needs of diverse communities. We believe there’s strength in diversity and the complex understanding that comes from multiple life experiences and perspectives in the workplace. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Arsenal’s Pepe continues to prove prowess as penalty expert

first_img Loading… The Ivory Coast international had scored a sublime goal in the Gunners 2-1 loss against Brighton and Hove Albion last weekend with the assist coming from Anglo-Nigerian wideman Bukayo Saka. This time, Alexandre Lacazette was brought down in the box by Chris Basham in the first half and referee Paul Tierney wasted no time in pointing to the spot. Pepe stepped up and dispatched with ease. Sheffield equalised in the 87th minute via David McGoldrick, but Real Madrid loanee Daniel Ceballos saved the game from going into extra time with the winner in injury time. It was Pepe’s second successful penalty conversion for Arsenal after netting his first in a 3-2 comeback Premier League home win over Aston Villa on September 22, 2019. It was also his first goal for the north London club on that occasion.Advertisement The goal at Bramall Lane means Pepe has now scored 12 of his last 13 penalties dating back to his time with Lille. Arsenal have equally been successful in 12 of their last 13 spot-kicks. This strong record is a ray of light for Pepe who has been criticised for not living up to expectations since his record £72 million move from Lille last summer. Though he has played 34 times in all competitions, he has scored only seven goals and provided eight assists, which is a very low standard compared to his final season with Lille where he had a hand in 35 competitive goals (23 goals, 12 assists) in 41 outings. Pepe’s most notable goals for Arsenal this season came in a 3-2 win over Vitoria Guimaraes in the group phase of the Europe League. The Gunners were down 2-1 and Pepe came on for Lacazette 15 minutes from time and scored a fantastic brace in the 88th and 90th minutes, his second being a delicious free-kick deep in injury time. Arsenal’s next challenge will come at the Emirates Stadium against Norwich City in the Premier League on Wednesday evening. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Nicolas Pepe made it two goals in three games for Arsenal after scoring a penalty against Sheffield United in the FA Cup quarter-finals on Sunday.last_img read more

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Governor DeSantis Maintains High Approval Rating

first_imgA new poll shows that Ron DeSantis is maintaining a high approval rating one year after taking office.DeSantis told voters when he defeated Democratic rival Andrew Gillum in January 2019, “All I can promise is the sweat off my brow, a full heart, my best judgment and the courage of my convictions.”From April to December, Governor DeSantis maintained more than 60 percent approval among Floridians, according to the Mason-Dixon poll. As of last month, only 26 percent of the state’s residents disapproved of the job he is doing.Florida State University political science professor explains, “Even 40% of the Democrats approve of his governorship. That’s amazing, particularly this day and age with so much partisanship.”She believes the reason is because DeSantis has had no scandals, and has been active in creating as well as pushing policy.In addition, he has embraced environmental concerns and the legalization of medical marijuana, as well as an initiative to increase teacher pay.Weissert says, “I don’t want to say he’s not partisan. Clearly he is. But, I think he has surprised many Democrats and surprised many people.”She expects President Trump to rely on DeSantis to help him win the Sunshine State in the upcoming election.Among the governor’s goals for the 2020 legislative session, which begins next week, are the passage of a proposal that would allow college athletes to request payment for use of their likeness, as well as requiring E-Verify for employment, and providing more money for Florida Forever, a program geared toward the conservation and acquisition of recreational land.last_img read more

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