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CITY MARKET DONATES OVER $3,700

first_imgBurlington, Monday, February 7, 2005 – City Market, Onion River Coop presented the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS) with a large check in the amount of $3,719 from funds raised through the sale of Christmas trees this past holiday season.$222 of the money raised was matched through a new Neighbor to Neighbor program through Shurfine, a conventional grocery supplier to City Market. Shurfine gives City Market credit, which accrues over time. City Market can then use the money as matching funds for their own efforts. The Trees for COTS project meets the criteria for the matching funds program.Cumulatively, over the past 7 years, City Market has raised a total of $15,780 for COTS, through the Trees for COTS program. All proceeds are used to provide shelter and services to Vermonts homeless families and individuals.ADDITIONAL NOTES:City Market is searching for a new tree farmer for the Trees for COTS program for more information, please contact Jodi Harrington, City Market, 863-3659Since 1982 COTS has been providing emergency shelter, services, and housing for people who are without homes or who are marginally housed. Each year COTS serves 1,600 homeless children, women and men through nine locations in Burlington, VT.WHO COTS SERVED IN 2004:” Waystation: 487 people served, 9,589 bednights Average of 29 per night” Daystation: 781 people served, 19,149 sign-ins Average of 52 per day” Case Management Services provided service to 675 individuals” Family Shelters and Family Services (includes all people who stayed in shelters and people not in shelter who worked with our case managers): 137 families for a total of 411 persons (adults and children).” COTS housed 56 families and 86 individuals in 2004.###last_img read more

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BT rings changes

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Systemic risk gets ‘hotspot’ status from actuarial regulation bodies

first_imgAccording to the report, the impacts on actuarial work from a severe pandemic are likely to include the possibility of a need to reassess how the employer covenant is considered in the support of DB pensions.Sir Jon Thompson, CEO of the Financial Reporting Council, which is one of the members of the JFAR, said: “The current coronavirus pandemic highlights the importance of identifying and managing risk. It will understandably introduce additional risk and uncertainty into the work of actuaries.“The Risk Perspective takes a holistic view of this and other key risks to the quality of actuarial work. Actuaries, employers and users of actuarial work are encouraged to collaborate effectively to understand and mitigate the risks to high quality actuarial work and to explore opportunities in the public interest.”“We are alive to the areas flagged in the report and continue to work closely with the industry to ensure savers remain protected”Sarah Tune, head of actuaries at The Pensions RegulatorThe other members of the JFAR are the Pensions Regulator (TPR), the Financial Conduct Authority, the Prudential Regulation Authority, and the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.Sarah Tune, head of actuaries at TPR, said: “The work carried out by actuaries is vital to the financial planning and investment strategies of all pension schemes and so we welcome this report which highlights the most pressing and emerging risks which could threaten retirement savings if not properly tackled. We are alive to the areas flagged in the report and continue to work closely with the industry to ensure savers remain protected.”Since early March a group of senior actuaries and other specialists have been working to help actuaries respond to the coronavirus crisis “quickly, meaningfully and thoughtfully”.Climate-related risk top hotspotThis year the JFAR’s analysis identified climate-related risk as the top hotspot, possibly “the defining risk of our times”.The risk, according to the report, is that “actuaries may not take into account appropriately, or communicate clearly, the impact of climate-related risks on decisions of users of actuarial advice”.After systemic risk, the JFAR states that ‘Ageing Population and Affordability’ is – “probably” – the third most significant risk in the context of actuarial work.It is “the risk of failure to allow appropriately for changing costs of mortality, morbidity and family support systems due to future experience deviating from projections”.The last of the “big four” risks, according to the JFAR, is “Unfair outcomes for individuals”, which refers to “the risk of actuaries not acting in the best interests of customers which may result in unfair treatment of some subgroups in favour other subgroups that are financially more profitable”.The other risks are:Geopolitical, Legislative and Regulatory Risk: The risk that actuaries are unable to consider, or plan, for the potential for political, legislative or regulatory change at an international or national levelTechnological Change and Competence In New Areas: The risk that actuaries entering new fields may not have a deep enough understanding of the statistics or that they may not adequately understand artificial intelligence models or other disruptive advancesImpact Of Undue Commercial Pressure: The risk that actuaries may be placed under significant pressure to adopt inappropriate assumptions or models to achieve desired commercial outcomesEffective Communication: The risk of actuaries failing to adequately explain the risks and potential adverse outcomes to decision makers or to others impacted by the actuarial work Systemic risk is one of three risks that have been identified as new “hotspots” by the UK’s Joint Forum on Actuarial Regulation (JFAR) because of a perceived increase in risk to the public interest where actuarial work is central.‘Effective communication’ and ‘Impact of Undue Commercial Pressure’ are the other new hotspots.In its new ‘Risk Perspective’ report, the group explained that it had decided to include the actuarial risks associated with pandemics as a subset of systemic risk, rather than to introduce a further hotspot specific to pandemics.The systemic risk hotspot is explained as “the risk that actuaries may not allow appropriately for the increasing global interconnectedness of risk or may be inappropriately guided by groupthink”. The full Risk Perspective report can be found here.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

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Daniel Tolbert, Sr., Dies

first_imgThe death is announced of Deacon Daniel F. Tolbert, Sr., a Liberian businessman and younger brother of President William R. Tolbert, Jr.This sad event occurred on Friday, March 28, 2014 at his home in Sinkor, Monrovia.  He was 80.Daniel was born on December 17, 1934 to Zina Fahnbulleh, daughter of Momo Fahnbulleh and Konah Darblo of Grand Cape Mount County, and William R. Tolbert, Sr. of Montserrado County.He spent his early years in Bensonville where his mother taught him the value of hard work, and his father instilled in him the importance of education.Young Daniel visited and shared breakfast with his father every morning on his way to Bensonville Government School, where the seeds planted by his father took root. He excelled as a student learning that it was important to his parents, whom he strived to please, according to a family life sketch.In his early years Daniel lived with several family members, which imprinted upon him the value of his extended family.  Living with his maternal uncle Urias B. Freeman in Robertsport, Grand Cape Mount County, Daniel learned the value of duty and hard work.Later, he cultivated his love for God and self discipline while living with his eldest sister, Mrs. Florence Tolbert McClain, matriarch of the McClains, at Broad Street, Crown Hill in Monrovia.Daniel later lived with his elder brother Stephen A. Tolbert in Congo Town he  became exposed to the  world of business.He graduated from St. Patrick’s High School,  attended Prairie View University in Texas, United States of America. He later enetered Michigan State University, where he obtained a degree in Accounting.On returning to Liberia, he worked at the Mesurado Group of Companies, a major Liberian corporation started by his brother Stephen.  Daniel later started his own tax and accounting firm, Liberia Supply Corporation (LIBSCO) on Ashmun Street, Monrovia.He meanwhile studied law under the guidance of Councellor M. McDonald Perry at the Dukuly & Perry Law Firm and invested in real estate around Liberia. He followed that with the establishment of CAMER Shipping Lines, which still operates today in the Freeport of Monrovia.When events of April 12, 1980 took place, Daniel, like many prosperous Liberians at the time, suffered but he survived with his faith in God intact, and moved to the United States in 1982 where he focused on providing for his family, including many who had also been displaced.He invested in real estate in the USA and owned and operated a Baskin Robbins Ice Cream franchise, providing employment for his children and other family members.Deacon Daniel also made successful investments in Senegal and The Gambia until he finally returned home.One of his daughters, Annmarie Zina Tolbert,predeceased him.He leaves to mourn his loving and dedicated wife of 46 years, Mrs. Myrna R. Tolbert; his children, Beatrice Nuarhpa, Konah Tolbert-Karas, Daniel F. Tolbert Jr., Rosemarie S. Tolbert-Clinton, Fametta M. Tolbert- McKinney, Wilhelmina Tolbert-Banfield, and Luakena A. Tolbert; grandchildren, Myrna Aful, Zina Karas, Zaiya Karas, Aidan Banfield, Amisa Banfield, Daniel F. Tolbert III, Jayden Clinton, and Zahari Clinton; a sister, Kula Tolbert; a brother, Levi Tolbert, and a host of other relatives.Daniel was always present at church in Bensonville on Sundays, where he served as a member of the Deacon Board, and visited as many relatives as time permitted.The body will be removed from the Samuel A. Stryker Funeral Parlors on Thursday, April 10 at 4 o’clock p.m. and taken to  the Zion Praise Baptist Church, Bentol City, where wake keeping will take place from six to nine  o’clock p.m.The funeral service will take place on Friday, April 11, at 11 o’clock a.m. at the same church, followed immediately by internment.  A family spokesperson said all tributes, with the exception of the immediate  family, will be paid during the wake. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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