Month: November 2020

Kamala Harris, elected V.P., has risen higher in national politics than any woman before her.

first_img– Advertisement – Kamala Harris, a senator from California and former presidential candidate, made history when she was elected vice president of the United States.Her victory represents a handful of firsts: She will be the first woman, the first Black woman, the first Indian-American woman and the first daughter of immigrants to be sworn in as vice president.- Advertisement – It also marks a milestone for a nation in upheaval, grappling with a long history of racial injustice. Over the course of her campaign, Ms. Harris has faced both racist and sexist attacks from conservatives — including President Trump — who have refused to pronounce her name correctly.The daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Ms. Harris, 56, embodies the future of a country that is growing more racially diverse every year — even if the person whom voters picked for the top of the ticket is a 77-year-old white man. She brought to the race a more vigorous campaign style than that of the president-elect, Joseph R. Biden Jr., including a gift for capturing moments of raw political electricity on the debate stage and elsewhere. A former San Francisco district attorney, Ms. Harris was elected as the first Black woman to serve as California’s attorney general. When she was elected a U.S. senator in 2016, she became only the second Black woman in the chamber’s history. Almost immediately, she made a name for herself in Washington with her withering prosecutorial style in Senate hearings.- Advertisement –center_img Beginning her presidential candidacy with homages to Shirley Chisholm, Ms. Harris was seen as a potential front-runner for the Democratic nomination, but she left the race weeks before any votes were cast. Part of her challenge, especially with the party’s progressive wing, was the difficulty she had reconciling stances she had taken as California’s attorney general with the current mores of her party.As the vice-presidential nominee, Ms. Harris has endeavored to make plain that she supports Mr. Biden’s positions — even if some differ from those she backed during the primary.And although she struggled to attract the very Black voters and women she had hoped would connect with her personal story during her primary bid, she made a concerted effort as Mr. Biden’s running mate to reach out to people of color, some of whom have said they felt represented in national politics for the first time. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More

Los Angeles coroner announces independent inquiry into police killing of Andrés Guardado

first_imgA decision to criminally charge Vega and possibly Hernandez will be in the hands of new district attorney George Gascón, who has met with relatives of people killed by police and “promised to reopen a number of controversial shooting cases involving law enforcement officers that [outgoing district attorney Jackie] Lacey declined to prosecute,” LA Times continued.Guardado’s family in June filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the county, the sheriff’s department, Vega, and Hernandez, alleging they “not only used unreasonable and excessive force in fatally shooting the young man but were possibly acting in connection and in agreement with members of one or more LASD gangs of which they may be affiliated,” a release said. ”The complaint, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court on behalf of Elisa and Cristobal Guardado, seeks to hold the defendants accountable for violating various civil rights as well as the California Bane Act that resulted in the execution of 18-year-old decedent, Andres Guardado.” The statement from the Los Angeles County coroner’s office said the inquest gives officials power to “subpoena relevant witnesses to testify and documents to present at the inquest,” after which retired Justice Candace Cooper “will make findings related to the cause and manner of death.” Cooper “will then forward her decision and recommendation to the Medical Examiner-Coroner,” the coroner’s office continued.News of the inquest is welcome news for Guardado’s family and advocates, who have slammed the secrecy and lack of transparency from the sheriff’s department following his killing in June. In just one instance, Sheriff Alex Villanueva placed a hold on Guardado’s case, which blocked his autopsy report from release. But in another “unusual move” from the coroner’s office, CNN reported, “Dr. Lucas opted to remove the security hold and make Guardado’s autopsy results public in July.”- Advertisement – Both the independent autopsy performed at the request of Guardado’s family and the coroner’s office autopsy found that the 18-year-old was shot five times in the back by the sheriff’s department. “These findings confirm what we have known all along,” his family said according to LAist, “which is that Andrés was unjustifiably killed by a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy.”That officer, Miguel Vega, has faced previous accusations of misconduct, including “making false statements in an investigation,” the Los Angeles Times previously reported. Further damning information against the sheriff’s department is court testimony from a sheriff’s deputy identifying Vega and Chris Hernandez, the deputy with him when he shot and killed Guardado, as potential recruits for a racist and violent law enforcement gang. When it comes to Villanueva, his “handling of the shooting and attempts to block information from being made public are among a laundry list of criticisms he has faced in recent months,” the Los Angeles Times reports, “leading the county Board of Supervisors to narrowly approve a motion Tuesday to explore options that could lead to his removal from office.”- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More

Kevin De Bruyne says he wants Manchester City stay after revealing contract talks | Football News

first_imgSterling suffers ‘small’ injuryRaheem Sterling suffered a “small” injury ahead of England’s Nations League game away to Belgium on Sunday, with Gareth Southgate saying he is hopeful the forward will be fit “by the end of the week”.Speaking ahead of kick-off, Southgate said: “Raheem felt something a couple of days ago and didn’t train on Friday as a precaution.“He started training yesterday and wasn’t really happy with it. We have discussed it and it isn’t one to take a chance on.“I think he will be fine by the end of the week, but the games for us just came too quickly.Manchester City will be hopeful that Sterling recovers in time for their clash with Tottenham on Saturday – live on Sky Sports – as they bid to make up the five-point gap between them and Jose Mourinho’s side in the Premier League. 5:19 Kevin De Bruyne says he wants to stay at Manchester City after revealing he is in talks with the club over a new contract.The 29-year-old confirmed the news after helping Belgium to a 2-0 win over England in the Nations League on Sunday night.- Advertisement – Highlights of the Nations League Group A2 match between Belgium and England – Advertisement –center_img De Bruyne – whose current contract expires in 2023 – joined City from Wolfsburg in 2015 and has gone on to make 232 appearances for the club.He admitted earlier this year that he would be forced to consider his future at the Etihad Stadium if City’s two-year ban from European competition was upheld.However, City successfully overturned the ban ahead of the 2020/21 campaign, allowing them to compete in this season’s Champions League. preview image– Advertisement – Speaking to Belgian TV station VTM Nieuws, De Bruyne said: “I am at a good club [with] good owners.“We are a bit in talks – not advanced. At the moment I am doing the talks myself.“I would like to stay with the club, so it’s easy. If I didn’t want to stay, it would take someone to mediate. But when you want to stay, it’s not so difficult.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More

Avian flu deaths reported in Indonesia, China

first_imgJan 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A 22-year-old chicken seller in Indonesia died yesterday after testing positive for avian influenza, and a young Chinese woman whose case was reported previously also succumbed to the disease this week.The Indonesian man died after a week of hospitalization, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report quoting Ilham Patu of the Sulianti Saroso Hospital in Jakarta.Local testing showed he had the H5N1 avian flu virus, the story said. If his case is confirmed by tests at a Hong Kong lab accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO), he will be counted as the 15th Indonesian to die of avian flu.The Chinese victim was a 29-year-old woman from Chengdu City in the south-central province of Sichuan, the WHO reported on Jan 25. She became ill Jan 12 and died Jan 23. Some previous reports had listed her age as 36.She worked in a dry-goods shop and had no reported exposure to sick birds, the WHO said. Her case was the second one in China so far this year. The first case was also in Sichuan province but was about 150 kilometers from the latest one. No poultry outbreaks had been reported in the areas where the two patients lived, though one occurred elsewhere in the province in December.China has had 10 human cases of H5N1 avian flu, with 7 deaths, the WHO said. The cases began last November.In other news, Turkish health officials today said a British lab had confirmed 12 of the 21 human H5N1 cases reported in Turkey, according to an AFP report.On the basis of in-country tests, Turkey has had 21 human cases, including 4 deaths, all occurring this month. The WHO has mentioned those numbers in reports but has not yet added them to its case count, pending confirmation by outside labs. The agency currently lists a global total of 152 cases with 83 deaths.The Turkish health ministry said 14 H5N1 patients had recovered and been released from hospitals, while three were still being treated, according to AFP. “It is encouraging that there have been no new cases [since January 17], but precautions should continue,” the ministry was quoted as saying.The apparent mortality rate in Turkey so far is much lower than in East Asia, where it has been more than 50%. A United Nations official said today that scientists are studying whether this means the virus is becoming less deadly in humans, according to a Reuters report.”The question being asked is, ‘Are these people having a milder form of the disease and what does that mean?'” said David Nabarro, the UN’s coordinator for avian and pandemic flu. He made the comments at a meeting sponsored by the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.Nabarro said the lower death rate in Turkey does not mean a reduced risk of a pandemic. “It simply is telling us that the virus may be changing the way it interacts with humans. It does not tell us that the risk of a mutation that causes the pandemic is increasing or decreasing,” he told Reuters.At the same meeting in Davos, business mogul Richard Branson predicted that a flu pandemic could halt up to 70% of commercial air traffic, according to another Reuters report.”If it happens, an airline is going to have 50 percent of its planes grounded, maybe more—60, 70 percent,” he said. Branson is the founder of Virgin Atlantic Airways and other carriers, the story said.In other developments, a wild bird called a magpie robin was positive for an H5 virus in preliminary testing in Hong Kong, according to AFP. Another magpie robin in Hong Kong tested positive for an H5N1 virus last week.See also:Jan 25 WHO report on fatal human case in Chinahttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_01_25a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Read More

Nine-year-old is China’s 10th avian flu victim

first_imgMar 8, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – China reported today that a 9-year-old girl died 2 days ago of H5N1 avian influenza, becoming the country’s 10th person to succumb to the virus.The girl, whose case was announced Feb 27, lived in the eastern province of Zhejiang, the World Health Organization (WHO) said. She fell ill on Feb 10 and was in critical condition by the time her case was made public.China has had 15 confirmed human cases of avian flu. With the girl’s case, the global death toll has increased to 96 out of 175 cases, by the WHO’s count.The girl’s case, along with that of a 32-year-old man who died Mar 2, has prompted questions about how people are getting infected, according to a Reuters report published today.No bird outbreaks of H5N1 have been reported in Zhejiang in recent months, but the girl fell ill after visiting relatives in Anhui province who owned some chickens, some of which were sick, according to earlier reports.The 32-year-old victim was from Guangdong province and lived in an urban area with no reported bird outbreaks, Reuters reported. The story said he was believed to have been exposed to the virus at a poultry market.Zhong Nanshan, director of the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, suggested that both victims might have caught the virus from chickens that were carrying it asymptomatically, according to Reuters.Meanwhile, a top Chinese health official was quoted today as saying that China’s human victims of avian flu had “defective” immune systems. A Bloomberg News story said the comments by Wang Longde, vice minister of health, were reported by the Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post.Wang said the government had studied several cases, but he gave no details, according to the report. The Bloomberg story stated that Wang “said the victims had ‘defective’ immune systems and the general public shouldn’t panic.”However, published scientific reports have not pointed to weak immunity as a common risk factor in human cases. (See link to CIDRAP overview of avian influenza, below.)A WHO official, Aphaluck Bhatiasevi, told the Hong Kong newspaper there is no scientific evidence that infection is linked to immunity. She said cases have been associated with contact with birds, not strength or weakness.Also today, the WHO reported that a 3-day conference in Geneva produced progress on plans for responding quickly to early signs of a flu pandemic. In a news release, the agency said the operational plan “moved closer to final form” as the meeting of 70 public health experts ended today.The results of the meeting will be circulated for review and published as soon as they are ready, the WHO promised.See also:CIDRAP overview of avian influenza and its implications for human diseaselast_img read more

Read More

Avian flu in Myanmar concerns FAO

first_imgApr 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Avian influenza is continuing its spread among birds in many countries worldwide, with widespread outbreaks reported in Myanmar.More than 100 outbreaks have occurred in poultry in Myanmar (formerly Burma) since the presence of H5N1 avian flu was announced there about a month ago, officials from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) told Reuters news service yesterday.The bulk of the outbreaks appear to be occurring in Mandalay in central Myanmar and Sagaing in the northern part of the country, said He Changchui of the FAO. Two FAO teams have been on the ground in Myanmar.David Nabarro, avian flu coordinator with the United Nations, said the country has major problems. “We’re going to be focusing on Myanmar a lot in the next few days and weeks, trying to make sure that the authorities and civil society in that country are able to cope better,” he said.A World Health Organization (WHO) team will travel to Yangon at the end of April to assess how well people are being protected from the H5N1 virus spreading in poultry, Reuters reported.Myanmar’s military leadership is known for secrecy. The WHO describes communicable diseases as a major health problem in the nation.Other nations are fighting more public battles with the virus:Niger began culling poultry Apr 9, more than a month after H5N1 was first found in the country. The country had sought international help, saying it couldn’t conduct the culling on its own, Reuters reported Apr 9.Nigeria reported another nine outbreaks, mainly in commercial poultry, in Bauchi, Kaduna, and Jos, the country noted in an OIE report filed at the beginning of this month. The affected species include ostriches, emus, and black-crowned cranes.Israel has seen two new outbreaks in Jerusalem and HaDarom, totaling 50,000 birds, an OIE report said.The OIE continues to log more individual bird deaths and wild bird outbreaks in Europe, including in Croatia, Czech Republic (according to AFP), Denmark, France, Germany, Poland, Slovenia, and Switzerland.As avian cases spread in many parts of the world, officials in Thailand issued a final report on H5N1 to the OIE, claiming victory in their lengthy battle against the virus. The Mar 31 follow-up report said it had been 140 days since the last case of highly pathogenic avian flu in Thailand. That announcement comes in tandem with broad-based surveillance that included more than 57,000 cloacal swab samples collected in February.In the United Kingdom, debate swirled over the significance of an H5N1-infected swan found dead and partially consumed in northern Scotland on Mar 29.”The one swan doesn’t mean it (the virus) has arrived here,” said Sir David King, the government’s chief scientific adviser, on Apr 9 in a story from The Independent newspaper.DNA testing has identified the bird as a whooper swan, a migratory species that winters in Britain, according to an online report today by The Guardian newspaper.Charles Milne, the Scottish chief veterinary officer, said it wasn’t possible to tell where the swan contracted the lethal virus, The Guardian reported.”We are working on the assumption that the bird migrated to this country, but it’s impossible to say precisely where it died,” Milne was quoted as saying. Other media reports today speculated that the dead bird may have floated ashore from another country.Of 3,397 birds tested in recent months, including 428 swans from Feb 1 to Apr 1, only the dead whooper swan has tested positive for H5N1, according to the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).See alsoOIE reportshttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A_AI-Asia.htmlast_img read more

Read More

Tamiflu may pose risk of mental side effects

first_imgNov 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Mainly on the basis of reports from Japan, drug manufacturer Roche and US regulators are warning that influenza patients treated with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) may have an increased risk of self-injury and delirium.”People with the flu, particularly children, may be at increased risk of self-injury and confusion shortly after taking Tamiflu and should be closely monitored for signs of unusual behavior,” says a warning that Roche has added to its official product information, according to a company letter posted on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site.Oseltamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor, is used both to prevent and to treat flu and is regarded as the best available drug for dealing with a potential pandemic strain of flu. The United States and many other countries are stockpiling it because of the pandemic threat.The warning follows an FDA review of 103 reports of neuropsychiatric adverse events associated with oseltamivir use between Aug 29, 2005, and Jul 6, 2006, of which 95 came from Japan. That compares with 126 such adverse events reported between 1999 and August 2005. About two thirds of the problems were in children and youth (younger than 17 years).A report by the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research says the adverse events included three fatal falls—one in a 14-year-old boy who apparently fell to his death from a condominium balcony and two in men. Most of the events (60 of 103) were described as delirium with disturbed behavior. Other problems included “suicidal events,” panic attacks, delusions, convulsions, depressed consciousness, and loss of consciousness.The FDA and Roche both say the contribution of the drug to the adverse events is not known. The FDA report says influenza by itself can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders, but many of the problems reported, especially delirium and suicide attempts, were not typical of those associated with flu alone.Citing factors that seem to implicate oseltamivir in the events, the FDA said most of the problems occurred within a day after the start of treatment, and in many cases the physician suspected the drug was the cause. In addition, many of the patients recovered quickly after they stopped taking oseltamivir.”It is still unclear whether these neuropsychiatric events are drug-related only, disease manifestations alone, or a combination” of the two, the report states.The analysis notes that oseltamivir is used much more widely in Japan, with 24.5 million prescriptions from 2001 thorugh 2005, than in the United States, with 6.5 million prescriptions in the same period. In Japan the product information already includes a warning about possible psychoneurological problems.The FDA report expresses concern that if oseltamivir use in the United States increases to the levels seen in Japan, the number of adverse events will increase as well. “Therefore, it would be prudent to update the U.S. labeling to be similar in scope with the current Japanese labeling,” it says.The Japanese origin of most of the adverse event reports might suggest that the problems are related to genetic characteristics common in Japan, the FDA analysis says. But given the much greater use of the drug in Japan and the possibility of different surveillance practices there, the lack of cases reported in the United States doesn’t constitute good evidence for that hypothesis, it states.The FDA analysis was prepared for the agency’s Pediatric Advisory Committee, which is scheduled to meet Nov 16.The latest developments come about a year after that committee concluded that 12 deaths in Japanese children who had been taking oseltamivir were not related to the drug. The FDA said then that the deaths seemed to be part of a wave of flu-related encephalitis and encephalopathy cases in Japanese children that began in the mid-1990s, before the drug was approved. But the committee asked the FDA to continue monitoring the situation and report again in a year.See also:FDA advice about potential neuropsychiatric side effects of Tamifluhttp://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm150758.htmRoche letter about possible riskshttp://www.fda.gov/downloads/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/UCM153422.pdfFDA staff analysis of adverse-event reports concerning TamifluNov 18, 2005, CIDRAP News story “FDA panel: Children’s deaths unrelated to Tamiflu”last_img read more

Read More

Indonesia: H5N1 samples going to WHO again

first_imgMay 15, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia’s health minister announced today at the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) annual meeting that the country has resumed sending H5N1 avian influenza virus samples to the WHO, appearing to end a 5-month standoff over developing countries’ access to vaccines.”I am pleased to announce to all of you that Indonesia has resumed sending its H5N1 specimens to the WHO collaborating center in Tokyo,” Siti Fadilah Supari said at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, according to a Reuters report.Dick Thompson, a WHO spokesman in Geneva, confirmed today that Indonesia recently began sending samples to the WHO collaborating center in Tokyo, according to a Bloomberg news report. However, the director of the Indonesian laboratory that has been storing the samples told Bloomberg he couldn’t confirm the report.Flu virus samples are used to track the viruses’ evolution, spread, and drug resistance and to develop vaccines.Indonesia stopped sending its H5N1 samples to the WHO in December and in February announced it would send no more until it received assurances that the strains would not be used by private companies to make vaccines that the country couldn’t afford.After a meeting between the WHO and Asian health officials in March, Supari said Indonesia would resume supplying the virus specimens immediately, in return for a WHO promise to revise its sample-sharing rules. But the country had continued to withhold the samples, saying it wanted a written guarantee that they wouldn’t be shared with drug companies without the country’s consent. It was unclear today whether Indonesia received a written assurance from the WHO.Supari took the opportunity today to reiterate Indonesia’s view that developing countries are at a disadvantage for access to pandemic vaccines, Reuters reported. “Sequences had been used for some parties for instance through research presentation, publication, commercialization, and requests for patents without our consent. Such practice violates the spirit in which the virus is given,” she told the assembly, according to Reuters.Supari’s announcement came as 17 developing countries introduced a resolution at the World Health Assembly demanding equitable access to vaccines made from H5N1 samples the countries provide, according to another Reuters report.Reuters reported that the resolution:• Calls for transparent and equitable sharing of benefits arising from information and virus samples provided by countries• Calls for affordable and timely access to vaccines, diagnostics, antiviral agents, or other medical supplies that evolve from use of the virus samples, and• Requires researchers and vaccine developers to seek informed consent from countries that contribute the viruses before using themThe WHO is expected to develop a new formula for sample sharing by the end of June, the Reuters report said.WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan, in a keynote speech at theWHO meeting today, spoke of working to ensure that developing countries have access to pandemic flu vaccines. Her speech was postponed from yesterday.”I am personally engaged in several efforts to ensure access to vaccines in all countries,” Chan said, according to the WHO text of the speech.”The first agreements to transfer technology to vaccine manufacturers in developing countries have been signed,” she continued. “We have initiated work on establishing a stockpile of H5N1 vaccine. Advance procurement mechanisms for pandemic vaccine are under development.”I am in dialogue with development partners and with executives from all the leading influenza vaccine companies. I am greatly encouraged by their commitment.”The World Health Assembly began yesterday and ends on May 23.See also:WHO transcript of Chan speechhttp://www.who.int/dg/speeches/2007/150507/en/index.htmlMore information on the WHO annual meetinghttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/events/2007/wha60/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Read More

Pandemic vaccine–making capacity rising, but still short

first_imgFeb 24, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The world’s capacity to produce vaccines for an influenza pandemic has risen sharply in the past 2 years, but it would still take an estimated 4 years to meet the global demand if a pandemic emerged now, according to a report from an international strategy consulting firm.The report was prepared by the New York City–based firm Oliver Wyman in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA).”Pandemic vaccine production capacity has increased by 300 percent over the last two years, largely driven by improvements in production yields and dosage-sparing technologies,” Oliver Wyman and the IFPMA stated in a news release. The company did not release the full report.If a pandemic emerged this year, the most likely case is that manufacturers could produce 2.5 billion doses in the first 12 months after they received the production strain, the firm said. It would take 4 years to produce enough to meet total global demand, meaning two doses for each of the world’s 6.7 billion people.In the best case, the industry could produce 7.7 billion doses in the first 12 months of a pandemic and could meet global demand in 1½ years, the firm said.The company predicts that annual pandemic vaccine production capacity will rise to somewhere between 5 billion and 14.5 billion doses over the next 5 years. That means the time needed to meet global demand could drop to 2½ years in the most likely case or 1 year in the best case.The firm also expects that surplus vaccine production capacity—above and beyond the demand for seasonal flu vaccine and prepandemic vaccine stockpiling—will increase over the next 5 years, to between 2.6 billion and 5.4 billion annual doses. How much the capacity actually rises is likely to depend on the demand for both seasonal and prepandemic vaccines, officials said.”I think this is a mixed story,” Adam Sabow, the Wyman partner who led the preparation of the report, told CIDRAP News. “This is good if there’s new seasonal [flu vaccine] demand or if there’s demand for H5N1 vaccine during the interpandemic period for efforts such as stockpiling.”However, if there isn’t demand, there’s a possibility that some of that capacity could be rationalized. By that we mean that capacity may either be shut down or may be redeployed for other purposes,” which would reduce the ability to respond quickly to a pandemic.He noted that there is some demand for H5N1 prepandemic vaccines, as some countries are stockpiling them, while the WHO is working on designing a global H5N1 vaccine stockpile. He said his firm is working with the WHO on that project.Alicia D. Greenidge, director-general of the IFPMA, said member companies are committed to working with the WHO and governments to ensure the best use of surplus vaccine capacity to prepare for a pandemic. “The findings suggest that the use of stockpiled H5N1-based vaccines, followed by pandemic vaccine as soon as these become available, offers a realistic strategy to address this significant threat,” she commented in the Wyman news release.Agreement on numbersSabow said that to estimate vaccine production capacity, his firm included 44 existing and planned vaccine production facilities, representing “the vast majority” of such facilities.He said the report marks a first: “This study is the first time that all the major actors have come together to agree on the capacity numbers for pandemic influenza. There’s historically been a debate about the numbers that has taken away from the policy discussion. We’re excited about this because the global health community has come together and agreed on the numbers and now can move on to the policy implications.”The report estimates that once a pandemic is recognized, it will take 4 months to develop, produce, and begin distributing a specific vaccine for it. Sabow said the estimate assumes the use of conventional egg-based production.”We worked very closely with the WHO and the manufacturers to break down the individual parameters of that lead time, and a lot of work has been done to make that lead time as short as possible,” he said. “This is currently the best information that our group has analyzed with regard to a realistic time at the point of a pandemic.”Egg-based and cell-based productionAlthough cell culture technology has been described as a faster and more flexible method for making flu vaccine, Sabow said the time needed to start making a pandemic vaccine would probably be about the same with cell culture production.”We did model this for both egg-based and cell-based production, and the expectation is that cell-based production would have a relatively similar time frame,” he said.While most flu vaccine production remains egg-based, the amount of cell-based production capacity is expected to increase considerably in the next 5 years, Sabow noted.One of the uncertainties is what will happen to egg-base production capacity as cell-based capacity comes on line, particularly if demand for seasonal and prepandemic vaccines is lacking. “If there isn’t demand, some of that egg-based capacity may be rationalized,” he said.A chart released by Wyman gives more specific estimates of how much vaccine could be produced in the first few months of a pandemic. It indicates that once a pandemic is declared, it will take 3 to 4 weeks to create a reference strain for vaccine production.In the most likely case, production would reach 340 million doses at 4 months after vaccine makers receive the reference strain, according to the chart. Production would reach 580 million doses at 5 months, 860 million doses at 6 months, and 2.45 billion doses at 12 months.Possible constraintsSabow said the Wyman analysis did not consider potential economic constraints on vaccine production and distribution or the possible effects of supply-chain disruptions, which many experts regard as likely during a pandemic.”The intent of our work was to say, based on the production capabilities of those facilities, what do we think the overall production looks like at the point of a pandemic,” he said. “We did not analyze what the financial implications would be or whether there would be funding for production or who would have access to it, and did not look at the possible supply-chain issues. That was not part of this analysis.”Sabow said the projections related to production of prepandemic vaccine stockpiling refer to H5N1 vaccines, but the estimates of production of actual pandemic vaccines do not assume that the next pandemic virus will be an H5N1 strain. “This is based on the history of producing a range of different influenza vaccine strains,” he said.See also: Oct 26, 2007, CIDRAP News report “The pandemic vaccine puzzle, part 2: Vaccine production capacity falls far short”last_img read more

Read More

From today, you can experience Samobor through a virtual walk

first_imgSamobor keeps pace with technological trends and from today Samobor can get to know virtually, ie through a virtual walk.Namely, the virtual walk through old Samobor and the still undiscovered Žumberak is the latest in a series of this year’s innovative projects of the Tourist Board of the town of Samobor.A 360-degree virtual walk through Samobor and Žumberak is a modern and innovative visual display of the city and its surroundings and enables user interaction with the service, helping them to orient themselves through the natural, historical and cultural sights of Samobor. In this way, tourists and guests are offered a new and different experience of sightseeing the city and presenting its attractions, and they are provided with a realistic and digital approach through the possibility of interaction and experience on a whole new level. “Virtual walk is a step forward in the promotion of our city and provides significant opportunities in attracting new guests, but also in returning the old who can now walk from their living room to our most interesting locations and revive beautiful memories that make it worthwhile to return here.“They point out from the Samobor Tourist BoardThe virtual walk is adapted for use on all devices connected to the Internet, without the need to install additional applications or programs. Try a virtual walk through Samobor here<br />
<a href=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/Serving/adServer.bs?cn=brd&pli=1074171063&Page=&Pos=-1477388646″ target=”_blank”><br />
<img src=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/Serving/adServer.bs?c=8&cn=display&pli=1074171063&Page=&Pos=-1477388646″ border=0 width=1280 height=200></a><br />
last_img read more

Read More