Category: hnjgtpxy

Navajo company to buy bankrupt Cloud Peak coal mines in Wyoming

first_imgNavajo company to buy bankrupt Cloud Peak coal mines in Wyoming FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Gillette News Record:Cloud Peak Energy Corp., one of the Powder River Basin’s largest coal mine operators, has accepted a bid from Navajo Transitional Energy Co. to buy “substantially all of Cloud Peak Energy’s assets.” Cloud Peak announced the sale Friday, which will be considered for approval by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court on Monday.Navajo Transitional Energy has agreed to buy the company’s Antelope and Cordero Rojo mines in Campbell County, along with the Spring Creek mine in southern Montana, according to a Cloud Peak statement announcing the winning bidder. Navajo also will own the Sequatchie Valley reclamation project.Navajo has agreed to pay a cash deposit of $15.7 million when the sale closes and assume a $40 million second lien promissory note and five-year royalty on future tons of coal produced at the PRB mines. Navajo also will pay up to $20 million in post-petition debts accrued during the bankruptcy process. The company also has agreed to assume pre- and post-petition federal, state and local tax liabilities for the company, make state and federal royalty payments and assume all reclamation obligations.While it’s unknown what Navajo Transitional’s plans are for the PRB mines, that it bought all three operational properties and that the deal includes royalties based on future production, “[What] they’re saying is they’re assuming they can operate them and generate enough cash flow to make those commitments,” said Rob Godby, director of the Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy at the University of Wyoming College of Business.Because the Navajo Nation governs itself, it also could have some tax advantages as operator of the mines, which could make them more competitive, he said. “One of the things about the Navajo bid is they probably have favorable tax status for Native corporations,” he said. “What they’re potentially looking at having there is an interesting proposition. The bottom line is they assume they can make cash flow there, so that may replace some of the earnings they’ll lose on the Navajo power plant.”More: Cloud Peak has buyer for PRB mineslast_img read more

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Do This: Long Island Events February 19 – 25

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The ContortionistThis Indiana-based deathcore band twists and turns its audience with their high-energy sound. Join guitarist Robby Baca, guitarist Cameron Maynard, drummer Joey Baca, vocalist Mike Lessard, bassist Jordan Eberhardt, and keyboardist Eric Guenther as they rock the house to such metal favorites as “Predator” and “Holomovement.” Warming up the mosh pit will be Revocation, Fallujah, Toothgrinder and More of Myself to Kill. Revolution Bar and Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville. Revolutionli.com $16. 6:30 p.m. Feb. 19.Jess InguiLong Island’s own Jess Ingui will take the stage to wow audiences with her powerful vocals. This singer/songwriter’s sultry sound is something every LIer should experience once. Like a local version of Beyoncé, her R&B, jazz, and soul-infused sound awakens the deep recesses of your heart. Opening the show are Leah Laurenti and Cora Small! 89 North Music Venue, 89 North Ocean Ave., Patchogue. 89northmusic.com $10. 7 p.m. Feb. 19.Chris Robinson BrotherhoodRising like a phoenix from the ashes of brothers-fueled Southern rock and blues hellraisers The Black Crowes’ indefinite hiatus (a group featuring Chris Robinson on vocals and brother Rich on guitar), Brother Chris continues melding the realms of all that is supersonic and cataclysmic in rock. Touring in support of their latest drop, Phosphorescent Harvest, this LA-based psychedelia-rock powerhouse has released three albums to critical success, including The Magic Door and Big Moon Ritual. Will they launch into The Crowes’ “Remedy,” just for old-time’s sake? Only one way to find out. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $15-$30. 8 p.m. Feb. 19.Leon RusselLeon Russell first made a career for himself as a session musician for such musical heavyweights as George Harrison, Barbra Streisand, B.B. King, Eric Clapton and Frank Sinatra before embarking on a storied and prolific solo career as a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honoree recording artist, as well as an inductee into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. His signature country rock and folk sound immediately recalls a bygone era of authentic American sounds. With special guest Riley Ethridge Jr. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $40-$75. 8 p.m. Feb. 19.Average White BandScottish funk and R&B band Average White Band is best known for their soul and disco hits like “Pick Up the Pieces.” The fifteenth most sampled band in history, you have heard their tracks on recordings by the Beastie boys, Ice Cube, Eric B. and Rakim, and A Tribe Called Quest, among others. This band has been performing to throngs of fans for more than 40 years and AWB still rocks the house. Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $45-$50. 8 p.m. Feb. 19.The Beatles in cartoon form, as drawn by Ron Campbell.Beatles Animator ExhibitRon Campbell, director of the Beatles 1960s Saturday Morning Cartoon series and animator of the classic film Yellow Submarine, will be exhibiting artwork and creating new Beatles pop art paintings live during a reception and talk for his rare exhibit. He will also be exhibiting artwork featuring other beloved cartoon characters that encompass his 50-year career in children’s television, such as Scooby Doo, The Smurfs, Rugrats, Winnie the Pooh, The Flintstones, Jetsons, and more. The event runs all weekend long. Frame & Art Gallery, 4 Audrey Ave., Oyster Bay. RonCampbellAnimator.com 5 p.m. Feb. 20.Common ThreadsA reception for an exhibit featuring the work of artists who have adapted age-old techniques to express modern concepts of light, color, mass and transparency. In this spectacularly breathtaking exhibition, artists utilize fiber to create conceptual pieces that are clearly contemporary in style and spirit. They include: Michael A. Cummings, a contemporary quilter whose work tells stories of African American history, Justine Moody and Pat Solan, who each use felted wool techniques from which they create two and three dimensional works, as well as Eve Kousourou, who uses the structure of a loom to construct her tapestries, scarves and rugs. Gallery North, 90 N Country Rd., Setauket-East Setauket. gallerynorth.org Free. 5 p.m. Feb. 20.Pink Floyd ExperienceBand leader Tom Quinn purchased his first guitar when Pink Floyd’s epic album Dark Side of the Moon was released. Four decades later, Quinn is doing more than just mimicking the iconic band with a few strokes of his guitar, he’s giving fans of the legendary London-based band the full, mind-blowing experience. Any admirer of Pink Floyd’s influential music would appreciate a show like this. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $35-$55. 8 p.m. Feb. 20.The Machine (Photo by Michael Frank)The Machine Performs Pink Floyd UnpluggedSome bands develop such a devout following that their music may inspire maybe one top-notch cover band. When it comes to Pink Floyd the verdict is still out as to who’s the best, but at least Long Island gets a double-dose of Pink Floyd-inspired sets this week. The Machine, a New York-based band with 25 years of performing Floydian music, promises to deliver a passionate performance that will have even the most diehard Floyd fans reliving the glory days. Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $40-$45. 8 p.m. Feb. 20.WinterFolkA program of special songs for the snow season by a dynamic group that has just released When One Door Closes, their first CD. Our Times Coffeehouse, 38 Old Country Rd., Garden City. ourtimescoffeehouse.org $15 adults, $10 students. 8 p.m. Feb. 20.Fine Art ReceptionA reception for the Red Exhibit, which benefits the American Heart Association and features the works of dozens of photographers. Runs through Feb. 28. Long Island Photo Gallery, 467 Main St., Islip. LongIslandPhotoGallery.com Free. 2 p.m. Feb. 21.Willy Wonka Jr.The delicious adventures experienced by Charlie Bucket on his visit to Willy Wonka’s mysterious chocolate factory light up the stage in this captivating adaptation of Roald Dahl’s fantastical tale. Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts. 71 East Main St., Patchogue. patchoguetheatre.org $14. 11 a.m., 3 p.m. Feb. 21.Soul JunkiesThis Babylon-based roots reggae band, founded in 2012, has quickly made a name for itself in the short time the trio has been officially playing together. Inspired by the reggae sounds made popular by legendary musician Bob Marley, Soul Junkies exudes the type of passion that’s necessary to cultivate a devoted fan base and have created an impressive catalogue of hits. With InDaze and Short Notice. Vibe Lounge, 40 North Park Ave., Rockville Centre. vibeloungeli.com $10. 7 p.m. Feb. 21.RainNobody—nobody—could ever match the immense popularity of the Beatles, but that doesn’t mean fans of the band should close off their minds to talented musicians, such as those that make up RAIN. The group will pay tribute to the iconic band from Liverpool by performing classic Beatles songs with a mastery that few can match. Will they play Press favorite “Blackbird”? “Rocky Raccoon”?? What about “Helter Skelter”!?!? We sure hope so! NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $49.50-$62.50. 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Feb. 21. The Daily Show Writers Standup Tour “An Evening of Political-ish Comedy”This show may have taken on greater significance now that Jon Stewart announced he’d be retiring later this year. Stewart won’t be performing but a number of talented writers and producers from the critically-acclaimed satirical late night show will be on hand. Following the show, the group will also take part in a Q&A in which they’ll discuss how the half-hour show is produced. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $20-$35. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.Leo KottkeNo one in the world plays guitar like Leo Kotke. Or sings like him, when he’s in the mood to accompany his flying fingers with his rich, distinctive voice. His body of work has so much artistic integrity and eclectic eccentricity it’s scary. Judge him from his album titles like My Feet Are Smiling, Burnt Lips and Peculiaroso, and you won’t have a clue what he sounds like, but you will get the idea that he’s one of a kind. It’s funny to consider that one of America’s greatest acoustic guitarists started out on the trombone, but as he put it, “I never considered that a life in trombone might differ from the one I was imagining… a life lived in hotels, in black suits and skinny ties, Ray-Bans indoors, by someone who never played much and was depressed… I was guided by trombonists, note by note, toward home.” Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $50-$55. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.The SmithereensNot many rock groups can say they came out of Carteret, New Jersey, but that distinction could be another reason the Smithereens are so freaking great. Maybe they took their suburban alienation to a deeper level and mastered it to musical perfection. Maybe they would have created an equally awesome sound if they’d been from Piscataway or Cape May. These philosophical questions are mere distractions from the essential truths that the Smithereens have been blowing their audiences away for years with their “Marshall-amped post-mod power pop,” as USA Today’s Brian Mansfield put it so well. From “Beauty and Sadness” to “Blood and Roses,” The Thrilla, Jim, Dennis, Pat and Andy Burton from John Mayer’s band on keyboards will be in fine form. And so will we, once we hear that first fantastic crashing guitar chord. Suffolk Theater, 118 East Main St., Riverhead. suffolktheater.com $49. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.Eric Gales BandThe title of his 14th amazing album is Good For Sumthin, and the man from Memphis is too damn modest, because he’s got something great going on, and you can see it beaming from his face as he’s standing in front of a psychedelicized Bodhisattva on the album cover blazing on his upside-down Strat—his exuberance is radiantly clear. Guitar Player Magazine amusingly says that “Gales has always preferred his blues on the rocks” but his sound is heavier than that, more in the spirit of Hendrix (he also plays left-handed), but harder to pin down, less rooted in the dusty, moldy past, and more “like a classic blues-rock power trio pumped up on progressive metal.” When guitar god Joe Bonamassa says Eric Gales is “one of the best, if not the best, guitarist in the world today,” you know that’s no small claim. That’s something to brag about, but that’s not his style. Treme Blues and Jazz Club, 553 Main St., Islip. tremeislip.com $30. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.The South Shore SymphonyPiano soloist Dmitry Glivinskiy performs Ravel’s “Piano Concerto in G Major, Pavane” for a dead princess, “Rapsodie Espagnole” and “Suite II” from Daphnis et Chloe. Madison Theatre, Molloy College, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. MadisonTheatreNY.org $20. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.Trio SolistiTrio SolistiAcclaimed chamber music ensemble will feature Rachmaninoff’s “Trio No. 1 in G Minor,” Turina’s “Trio No. 2 in B Minor,” Liebermann’s “Trio No. 3” and Trio Solisti’s arrangement of the Mussorgsky masterpiece “Pictures at an Exhibition.” Performing Arts Center, Adelphi University, Concert Hall, 1 South Ave., Garden City. triosolisti.com $35. 8 p.m. Feb. 21.Big ShotThe only Billy Joel tribute band featuring musicians, namely Mike DelGuidice, who have actually shared a stage with the most famous Long Islander, The Piano Man himself. Big Shot schedules tour dates around Billy Joel’s monthly Madison Square Garden concerts. A true fan, DelGuidice guarantees a proper homage to his idol. Mulcahy’s Pub and Concert Hall, 3232 Railroad Ave., Wantagh. muls.com $12. 9 p.m. Feb. 21.The Break ContestTwenty local bands face off in a battle of the bands for the chance to perform in the Skate and Surf Festival 2015 this May in New Jersey. Bands competing include 7SPLINTERS, Don’t Hit Me Up, Swear To Me, In My Sights, Matt Grabowski, Mint State, When Eyes Collide, White Line Tiger, Above Skylight, MHZ, Birth To Bridges, Count To Ten, Life After Death, Vanilla Coast, The Montauk Project, The Cavalry Is Us, Sir. Cadian Rhythm, Kill Trinity, Our Last Transmission and NFU. Support your local musicians! Revolution Bar and Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville. Revolutionli.com $12, $15 DOS. 12 p.m. Feb. 22.Cedar CreekCome hear Cedar Creek do what they do best. With Makeshirt, Attic Weather, See Change, Ethan Kriedmaker and Attica. Vibe Lounge, 40 North Park Ave., Rockville Centre. vibeloungeli.com $10. 6 p.m. Feb. 22.Natalie MacMaster and Donnell LeahyThese fiddlers are the most dynamic performers in Celtic music today. The evening will highlight the unique talents, influences, and stories of the first family of traditional fiddlers through world-class music making. Staller Center for the Arts, Stony Brook University, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook. staller.sunysb.edu $42. 7 p.m. Feb. 22.Academy Awards Viewing PartyComedian Rob Magnotti, best known for his spot-on impersonations of Hollywood stars, hosts a viewing party for the Academy Awards organized by the Long Beach International Film Festival. Guests will feel like stars themselves as they strut down the Red Carpet, but their own Hollywood Star, autograph it and add it to the “Walk of Fame.” Dinner and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Madison Theatre, Molloy College, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. MadisonTheatreNY.org $50. 7 p.m. Feb. 22.Wild CanariesWild CanariesQ&A with director/writer/co-star Lawrence Michael Levine! Barri (Sophia Takal) and Noah (writer-director Lawrence Michael Levine), a newly engaged Brooklyn couple, are disheartened by the death of their elderly downstairs neighbor, Sylvia. Though Noah sees nothing unusual about the old woman’s death, Barri suspects foul play and sets out to investigate, enlisting her roommate Jean (Arrested Development’s Alia Shawkat) to join her on a reconnaissance mission to trail a possible suspect. Tensions mount, however, when the investigation uncovers unsettling secrets throughout the building—including in their own apartment—and suddenly everyone seems like a reasonable suspect. Boasting a stellar supporting cast including Jason Ritter (Parenthood), Kevin Corrigan (The Departed), and Annie Parisse (The Following), Wild Canaries is a freshly comedic take on classic film noir. Soundview Cinemas, 7 Soundview Market Pl., Port Washington. goldcoastfilmfestival.org $15 advance, $10 students, $20 DOS. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23.PhilmThrash-metal innovator Dave Lombardo formerly played drums in Slayer, touring with them as part of Ozzfest and making some seminal albums. The musician is fearless. He’s got the chops to beat the music to death and bring it back to life, especially with his prowess on two bass drums that has proved inspirational. With his new band, Philm, formed in 2012, he’s been on fire, in fact that’s the operative word in the title of the band’s second album, Fire From the Evening Sun, which he produced. As Philm fans know, they burn boundaries between genres. Bass player Pancho Tomaselli can get down with the funk and rock it up while Gerry Nestler’s vocal chords can quiver with whispers or quake with manic screams. As Planet Mosh puts it, “Imagine a unique Quentin Tarantino movie, a romantic yet violent adventure…” Sounds like a ferocious version of the most lovely kind of destruction. With Lies Beneath, Serial Poets and Thorn Constellation. Revolution Bar and Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville. Revolutionli.com $18. 8 p.m. Feb. 24.Losing the DollhouseLocal author S. Jane Gari will speak and sign her new memoir. When 19-year-old Jane finally works up the nerve to expose the truth about her stepfather’s sexual advances, her mother is outraged. But not at the stepfather. Her mother takes his side-a betrayal that threatens to destroy the family and leaves Jane struggling to forge her own identity as she enters adulthood. Once marriage is on the table, Jane packs up her life and resolves to stare her demons down. Losing the Dollhouse offers a slice of dysfunctional Americana complete with divorce, stepfamilies, eating disorders, mental illness and the search for true love. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. Bookrevue.com Price of book. 7 p.m. Feb. 25.King LearA superb production of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy. A kingdom divided, a family destroyed, the faithful banished and the hateful left to wreak inhuman havoc in the realm. Four hundred years after it was written, King Lear resonates as never before. This powerful and unforgettable production of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy stars the incomparable Colm Feore in the role of a lifetime. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. CinemaArtsCentre.org $20 members, $25 public. 7 p.m. Feb. 25.The Sing-OffThe Sing Off Live Tour presents a fantastic evening of a cappella groups who made it big after singing their lungs off on NBC’s hit TV show, featuring VoicePlay, Street Corner Symphony, The Exchange and special guests Blue Jupiter. VoicePlay began with a trio of high school friends singing in the halls of their high school.  After graduation, they grew to five members and they went from performing at Orlando Theme Parks to the national stage on season four. Street Corner Symphony, finalists on the second season, hail from Nashville. Their repertoire ranges from Train to Dobie Gray and Creedence Clearwater Revival. The Exchange first met on the set of The Sing Off in 2012, becoming friends, sharing riffs, and touring around the world. Blue Jupiter is an a cappella pop-funk singing group from New York City, who breathe new life into popular tunes like “Let It Go,” from the film Frozen as well as “The Remedy,” “Steal My Kisses,” and more. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $39.50-$84.75. 8 p.m. Feb. 25.—Compiled by Jaime Franchi, Spencer Rumsey, Rashed Mian & Timothy Bolgerlast_img read more

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Kamala Harris, elected V.P., has risen higher in national politics than any woman before her.

first_img– Advertisement – Kamala Harris, a senator from California and former presidential candidate, made history when she was elected vice president of the United States.Her victory represents a handful of firsts: She will be the first woman, the first Black woman, the first Indian-American woman and the first daughter of immigrants to be sworn in as vice president.- Advertisement – It also marks a milestone for a nation in upheaval, grappling with a long history of racial injustice. Over the course of her campaign, Ms. Harris has faced both racist and sexist attacks from conservatives — including President Trump — who have refused to pronounce her name correctly.The daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Ms. Harris, 56, embodies the future of a country that is growing more racially diverse every year — even if the person whom voters picked for the top of the ticket is a 77-year-old white man. She brought to the race a more vigorous campaign style than that of the president-elect, Joseph R. Biden Jr., including a gift for capturing moments of raw political electricity on the debate stage and elsewhere. A former San Francisco district attorney, Ms. Harris was elected as the first Black woman to serve as California’s attorney general. When she was elected a U.S. senator in 2016, she became only the second Black woman in the chamber’s history. Almost immediately, she made a name for herself in Washington with her withering prosecutorial style in Senate hearings.- Advertisement –center_img Beginning her presidential candidacy with homages to Shirley Chisholm, Ms. Harris was seen as a potential front-runner for the Democratic nomination, but she left the race weeks before any votes were cast. Part of her challenge, especially with the party’s progressive wing, was the difficulty she had reconciling stances she had taken as California’s attorney general with the current mores of her party.As the vice-presidential nominee, Ms. Harris has endeavored to make plain that she supports Mr. Biden’s positions — even if some differ from those she backed during the primary.And although she struggled to attract the very Black voters and women she had hoped would connect with her personal story during her primary bid, she made a concerted effort as Mr. Biden’s running mate to reach out to people of color, some of whom have said they felt represented in national politics for the first time. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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The deadline for making a decision on the amount of the tourist tax for 2020 has expired

first_imgWhat is the tourist tax for next year in your city or municipality? Attachment: RULEBOOK ON THE MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF TOURIST FEE According to the new Ordinance on the lowest and highest amount of tourist tax, the decision on the amount of tourist tax for 2020 should have been made by September 15, 2019.  Tourist tax through two seasonal periods  If the County Assembly, ie the City Assembly of the City of Zagreb does not make a decision on the amount of tourist tax per person per night and / or on the amount of the annual lump sum tourist tax until September 15. 2019, the lowest amount of tourist tax is applied, ie the lowest lump sum amount of tourist tax determined by the Ordinance. Most cities and municipalities have decided to keep the lump sum at the lowest amount of 350 kuna, while few cities and municipalities have decided to increase the tourist tax.  In accordance with the new Ordinance on the lowest and highest amount of tourist tax, the amount of tourist tax can be determined for the highest two seasonal periods (instead of the previous three), with one seasonal period lasting from April 1 to September 30 of the current year. Also, the amount of the tourist tax from 1 January 2020 is no longer determined by tourist classes. Thus, in the city of Zagreb, the increase of the annual flat rate per bed from 345 to 400 kuna, while in Dubrovnik it remained at the same level as this year, although a significant increase was announced, especially in the old town to the maximum amount. To remind, the news from this year is that the decision on the amount of the flat tax for renters is no longer made by the Ministry of Tourism but by the representative body of local self-government units. According to the Ordinance on the lowest and highest amount of tourist tax, it is defined that the tourist tax for persons providing catering services in the household or on a family farm per bed may not be less than 350 kuna or more than 1.500 kuna. Finally, it is important to point out that 65 percent of the money from the tourist tax remains with the local community for tourism development, and the rest is shared with the regional and national community, which means that there will be money for arranging and developing tourist destinations. So, if the city or municipality has not made a decision for 2020 by September 15, 2019, the amount of tourist tax will be 350 kuna. last_img read more

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Berkeley homes in on Chelsea

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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VIDEO: CEDA President Talks on the Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>In an effort to proactively support the upcoming CEDA-IADC Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure Conference, Dredging Today recently met with the President of Central Dredging Association Mr Polite Laboyrie (Witteveen + Bos) and asked him a couple of questions about this unique event.The event – taking place on November 19-20th at the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam – will celebrate the launch of the guidebook ‘Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure‘.Mr Polite Laboyrie, one of the editors of the Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure, explained this one-of-a-kind publication as a “from the community for the community book”.According to him, this guidebook is unique because it is made by and also for all parties involved in infrastructure projects where dredging is needed, including clients, contractors, consultants, institutes, universities, legislators, etc.“This makes it unique and also reflects the present day best practice in realizing dredging projects,” continued Mr Polite Laboyrie. “Sharing the knowledge is the best thing you can do. So in that way, you don’t invent the wheel, but you really use all the knowledge that is available.”Mr Polite Laboyrie also added that professionals who attend the conference are going to experience what is in the book and what it mean to use the elements, the key enablers, the methods, the system and what helps to make the difference.last_img read more

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Plastic heart gives dad Matthew Green new lease of life

first_img Tweet Mr Green says he is excited about playing in the garden with his son A 40-year-old father who was dying from heart failure is set to leave hospital after receiving an artificial heart.Matthew Green is ready to go home and await a transplant after surgeons at Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire replaced his heart with an implant.His new plastic heart is powered by a portable driver in a backpack, which he said had “revolutionised” his life.It is thought to be the first time a UK patient has been able to go home with an entirely artificial heart.Around 900 similar operations have been carried out around the world.Mr Green said: “It’s going to revolutionise my life. Before I couldn’t walk anywhere. I could hardly climb a flight of stairs and now I’ve been up and I’ve been walking out and getting back to a normal life.“I went out for a pub lunch over the weekend and that just felt fantastic, to be with normal people again.”Consultant cardiothoracic surgeon Mr Steven Tsui said without the device Mr Green, from London, might not have survived the wait for a heart transplant operation.“At any point in time there may be as many as 30 people waiting for a heart transplant on our waiting list at Papworth, with one third waiting over a year,” he said.‘Excellent recovery’Artificial heart“Matthew’s condition was deteriorating rapidly and we discussed with him the possibility of receiving this device, because without it, he may not have survived the wait until a suitable donor heart could be found for him.”He said for the first time a patient was walking the streets of Britain without a human heart.Mr Green, who is married and has a son, had been suffering from Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC), a heart muscle disease that results in arrhythmia, heart failure and occasionally sudden death.His health had declined over recent years, meaning the only option available to him was a heart transplant.Earlier, he thanked the Papworth staff for making “it possible for me to return home to my family”.“Two years ago I was cycling nine miles to work and nine miles back every day, but by the time I was admitted to hospital I was struggling to walk even a few yards,” he said.“I am really excited about going home and just being able to do the everyday things that I haven’t been able to do for such a long time, such as playing in the garden with my son and cooking a meal for my family.”The SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart Mr Green received is used as a bridge-to-transplant for patients dying from end-stage biventricular heart failure, where both sides of the heart are failing.The device works in the same way as a heart transplant in that it replaces both failing ventricles and the heart valves they contain, thus relieving the symptoms and effects of severe heart failure. However, it is not suitable for long-term use.Mr Tsui, director of the transplant service at Papworth, said the operation on 9 June “went extremely well”.“Matthew has made an excellent recovery,” he said.“I expect him to go home very soon, being able to do a lot more than before the operation – with a vastly improved quality of life – until we can find a suitable donor heart for him to have a heart transplant.”Mr Green will leave Papworth with a backpack containing a 13.5lb (6kg) portable driver to power his new heart.Papworth Hospital carries out 2,000 major heart operations a year – more than any other hospital in the UK. Its first heart transplant, in 1979, was a UK first and the hospital has been using mechanical devices to support patients with end-stage heart failure since the 1980s.The Total Artificial Heart is a modern version of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart of the 1980s. In November, 1986, a patient received a Jarvik heart and was supported for two days before receiving a transplant.It is understood that other patients with mechanical hearts have been sent home before, but never with both ventricles replaced.Professor Peter Weissberg, Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said that for some patients, with severe heart failure, transplantation is their only hope of long-term survival, but donor hearts are not always available.He added: “Patients with mechanical hearts must remain permanently linked to a power supply via tubes that pass through the skin, which is a potential source of infection.“With this artificial heart, the power supply is small enough to fit in a shoulder bag so patients can walk around and go home.”BBC News Share 32 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring!center_img HealthLifestyle Plastic heart gives dad Matthew Green new lease of life by: – August 2, 2011 Share Sharelast_img read more

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Bulldogs Lose To Pirates In MS Track

first_imgThe Batesville Middle School Track Teams were defeated by The Greensburg Pirates.  The Girls team score was 63-42 and The Boys team score was 77-28.BMS Track Results vs Greensburg (4-30)Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Derek Suits.last_img

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Area Basketball Scores (1-3)

first_imgArea Basketball ScoresThursday  (1-3)Boys ScoresRipley County Tourney @ South RipleyGame 1: Batesville  69     Jac-Cen-Del  46Game 2:  Milan  62     South Ripley  60Rivertown Classic @ South DearbornGame 1: Switz. County  71     South Dearborn  68Game 2: Rising Sun  55     Lawrenceburg  47Girls ScoresNorth Decatur  66     South Decatur  40Greenwood Christian  54     Hauser  43Austin  54     SW-Hanover  43Columbus North  67     Jennings County  62Shelby County TourneyWaldron  52     Triton Central  35Morristown  61     SW-Shelby  53last_img read more

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Aussie Open: Djokovic set up Federer semi-final

first_imgRelatedPosts Djokovic clinches fifth Italian Open title Djokovic zooms to 10th Italian Open final Djokovic fined $10,000 for ‘unsportsmanlike conduct’ Defending champion Novak Djokovic set up an Australian Open semi-final against Roger Federer after producing another clinical performance to beat Canadian 32nd seed Milos Raonic. Djokovic had problems with his eye in the third set but dismantled Raonic’s potent serve to win 6-4 6-3 7-6 (7-1) The Serb second seed, who is aiming for a record-extending eighth title, has lost just one set in Melbourne so far. Djokovic, 32, will meet Swiss third seed Federer in Thursday’s semi-final. It is the pair’s first meeting at the Australian Open since Djokovic beat 38-year-old Federer in their 2016 semi-final. “He is one of the all-time greats and the match-ups against Roger and Rafa have made me the player I am today,” said Djokovic, who has lost just three times at Melbourne Park in the past decade. “I hope I can get just one match point against him. Let the better player win.”Tags: Australian OpenMilos RaonicNovak DjokovicRoger Federerlast_img read more

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