Category: hnjgtpxy

Berkeley homes in on Chelsea

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More

VIDEO: CEDA President Talks on the Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>In an effort to proactively support the upcoming CEDA-IADC Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure Conference, Dredging Today recently met with the President of Central Dredging Association Mr Polite Laboyrie (Witteveen + Bos) and asked him a couple of questions about this unique event.The event – taking place on November 19-20th at the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam – will celebrate the launch of the guidebook ‘Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure‘.Mr Polite Laboyrie, one of the editors of the Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure, explained this one-of-a-kind publication as a “from the community for the community book”.According to him, this guidebook is unique because it is made by and also for all parties involved in infrastructure projects where dredging is needed, including clients, contractors, consultants, institutes, universities, legislators, etc.“This makes it unique and also reflects the present day best practice in realizing dredging projects,” continued Mr Polite Laboyrie. “Sharing the knowledge is the best thing you can do. So in that way, you don’t invent the wheel, but you really use all the knowledge that is available.”Mr Polite Laboyrie also added that professionals who attend the conference are going to experience what is in the book and what it mean to use the elements, the key enablers, the methods, the system and what helps to make the difference.last_img read more

Read More

Plastic heart gives dad Matthew Green new lease of life

first_img Tweet Mr Green says he is excited about playing in the garden with his son A 40-year-old father who was dying from heart failure is set to leave hospital after receiving an artificial heart.Matthew Green is ready to go home and await a transplant after surgeons at Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire replaced his heart with an implant.His new plastic heart is powered by a portable driver in a backpack, which he said had “revolutionised” his life.It is thought to be the first time a UK patient has been able to go home with an entirely artificial heart.Around 900 similar operations have been carried out around the world.Mr Green said: “It’s going to revolutionise my life. Before I couldn’t walk anywhere. I could hardly climb a flight of stairs and now I’ve been up and I’ve been walking out and getting back to a normal life.“I went out for a pub lunch over the weekend and that just felt fantastic, to be with normal people again.”Consultant cardiothoracic surgeon Mr Steven Tsui said without the device Mr Green, from London, might not have survived the wait for a heart transplant operation.“At any point in time there may be as many as 30 people waiting for a heart transplant on our waiting list at Papworth, with one third waiting over a year,” he said.‘Excellent recovery’Artificial heart“Matthew’s condition was deteriorating rapidly and we discussed with him the possibility of receiving this device, because without it, he may not have survived the wait until a suitable donor heart could be found for him.”He said for the first time a patient was walking the streets of Britain without a human heart.Mr Green, who is married and has a son, had been suffering from Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC), a heart muscle disease that results in arrhythmia, heart failure and occasionally sudden death.His health had declined over recent years, meaning the only option available to him was a heart transplant.Earlier, he thanked the Papworth staff for making “it possible for me to return home to my family”.“Two years ago I was cycling nine miles to work and nine miles back every day, but by the time I was admitted to hospital I was struggling to walk even a few yards,” he said.“I am really excited about going home and just being able to do the everyday things that I haven’t been able to do for such a long time, such as playing in the garden with my son and cooking a meal for my family.”The SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart Mr Green received is used as a bridge-to-transplant for patients dying from end-stage biventricular heart failure, where both sides of the heart are failing.The device works in the same way as a heart transplant in that it replaces both failing ventricles and the heart valves they contain, thus relieving the symptoms and effects of severe heart failure. However, it is not suitable for long-term use.Mr Tsui, director of the transplant service at Papworth, said the operation on 9 June “went extremely well”.“Matthew has made an excellent recovery,” he said.“I expect him to go home very soon, being able to do a lot more than before the operation – with a vastly improved quality of life – until we can find a suitable donor heart for him to have a heart transplant.”Mr Green will leave Papworth with a backpack containing a 13.5lb (6kg) portable driver to power his new heart.Papworth Hospital carries out 2,000 major heart operations a year – more than any other hospital in the UK. Its first heart transplant, in 1979, was a UK first and the hospital has been using mechanical devices to support patients with end-stage heart failure since the 1980s.The Total Artificial Heart is a modern version of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart of the 1980s. In November, 1986, a patient received a Jarvik heart and was supported for two days before receiving a transplant.It is understood that other patients with mechanical hearts have been sent home before, but never with both ventricles replaced.Professor Peter Weissberg, Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said that for some patients, with severe heart failure, transplantation is their only hope of long-term survival, but donor hearts are not always available.He added: “Patients with mechanical hearts must remain permanently linked to a power supply via tubes that pass through the skin, which is a potential source of infection.“With this artificial heart, the power supply is small enough to fit in a shoulder bag so patients can walk around and go home.”BBC News Share 32 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring!center_img HealthLifestyle Plastic heart gives dad Matthew Green new lease of life by: – August 2, 2011 Share Sharelast_img read more

Read More

Bulldogs Lose To Pirates In MS Track

first_imgThe Batesville Middle School Track Teams were defeated by The Greensburg Pirates.  The Girls team score was 63-42 and The Boys team score was 77-28.BMS Track Results vs Greensburg (4-30)Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Derek Suits.last_img

Read More

Area Basketball Scores (1-3)

first_imgArea Basketball ScoresThursday  (1-3)Boys ScoresRipley County Tourney @ South RipleyGame 1: Batesville  69     Jac-Cen-Del  46Game 2:  Milan  62     South Ripley  60Rivertown Classic @ South DearbornGame 1: Switz. County  71     South Dearborn  68Game 2: Rising Sun  55     Lawrenceburg  47Girls ScoresNorth Decatur  66     South Decatur  40Greenwood Christian  54     Hauser  43Austin  54     SW-Hanover  43Columbus North  67     Jennings County  62Shelby County TourneyWaldron  52     Triton Central  35Morristown  61     SW-Shelby  53last_img read more

Read More

Aussie Open: Djokovic set up Federer semi-final

first_imgRelatedPosts Djokovic clinches fifth Italian Open title Djokovic zooms to 10th Italian Open final Djokovic fined $10,000 for ‘unsportsmanlike conduct’ Defending champion Novak Djokovic set up an Australian Open semi-final against Roger Federer after producing another clinical performance to beat Canadian 32nd seed Milos Raonic. Djokovic had problems with his eye in the third set but dismantled Raonic’s potent serve to win 6-4 6-3 7-6 (7-1) The Serb second seed, who is aiming for a record-extending eighth title, has lost just one set in Melbourne so far. Djokovic, 32, will meet Swiss third seed Federer in Thursday’s semi-final. It is the pair’s first meeting at the Australian Open since Djokovic beat 38-year-old Federer in their 2016 semi-final. “He is one of the all-time greats and the match-ups against Roger and Rafa have made me the player I am today,” said Djokovic, who has lost just three times at Melbourne Park in the past decade. “I hope I can get just one match point against him. Let the better player win.”Tags: Australian OpenMilos RaonicNovak DjokovicRoger Federerlast_img read more

Read More

Players still back me – Trapattoni

first_img Friday night’s 2-1 home defeat by Sweden left Ireland’s dreams of finishing second in Group C behind Germany in extreme jeopardy. In addition, Trapattoni, who is contracted only until the end of Ireland’s involvement whether or not it extends to Brazil next summer, found himself clinging grimly to his job amid concerted calls for him to go. Giovanni Trapattoni insists he still has the backing of his players as he prepares to mount a seemingly futile mission to rescue both World Cup qualification and his own future. In the immediate aftermath of the game, the 74-year-old Italian mounted a defiant defence of his record, and he was equally bullish on Saturday morning as he began his preparations for Tuesday night’s trip to Austria, where defeat would all but mathematically consign hopes of a South American adventure to the scrapheap. But asked if he was confident he still enjoyed the support of his players, he said: “Ask them, ask them this. “The players believe in what they have done and until this result, why should they change their habit?” Skipper Robbie Keane was refusing to be drawn into the growing clamour for action after a sizable proportion of a packed house at the Aviva Stadium greeted the final whistle with a chorus of boos. The striker said: “I’m certainly not going down that road because as professionals, as far as we are concerned he is the manager and we are going to give him 100 per cent backing. “Don’t forget, we have a game on Tuesday as well.” Central defender John O’Shea too was diplomatic when asked about the manager’s continued presence. He said: “That’s not up to me to decide. If we don’t qualify, they are the things that will be asked. Let’s wait and see.” In truth, it seems a case of when rather than if Trapattoni parts company with Ireland after only just surviving in the wake of last October’s 6-1 mauling by Germany in Dublin. It was not so much the fact of the defeat, but the nature of it which crossed the line for his most ardent detractors, although he emerged from cards-on-the-table discussions still in post with the financial implications of any divorce a major factor. Trapattoni and his staff were recruited at great expense – businessman Denis O’Brien has footed half the bill – in 2008 and although he came desperately close to taking Ireland to the 2010 World Cup finals in South Africa and did guide them to the Euros in Poland and Ukraine last summer, his relationship with the Irish footballing public has at times been tempestuous. His rigidity and conservatism have proved far from endearing, although as long as results were delivered, which they invariably were during the previous two campaigns, he could plead justification. But a return of just a single point from home games against Germany, Austria and Sweden has removed that defence as the shortcomings of his methods have been cruelly exposed. Nevertheless, he is adamant that his way will pay dividends in the future with the likes of Seamus Coleman, James McCarthy and James McClean spearheading a new generation of senior internationals. He said: “It was always a strong group with Germany, Sweden and also Austria. It was a tough group. “But we must continue for our growth and to develop our personality. Maybe in the future we can be a little bit more because now we have changed the squad. “We have many young players and I think they can improve their personality, their confidence and their trust. We must continue this. “Also if we finish third in the table behind Germany and Sweden and better than Austria, that must increase our personality.” Jon Walters, Simon Cox and Glenn Whelan all picked up knocks against the Swedes, but all three are expected to be able to board the plane when it leaves for Vienna on Sunday afternoon. They will jet out from Dublin hoping against hope that there are still twists and turns to come, but knowing their fate is no longer in their own hands. Trapattoni said: “Obviously, the table is more difficult, but I said this morning to the players, in their leagues, when they lose a game and when they play the next game, they start again with confidence, with trust and with the possibility to get a result. “Now we have to think this. We have three important games, not only the next against Austria. Every result is important and we not only a positive result, and we also have to wait and see what happens between Germany and Sweden. “It is important we continue in our way because in three games, anything can happen.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Read More

UPDATED: Boris Johnson Unveils UK’s Plan for Exiting Lockdown

first_imgThe U.K. government has replaced its “stay at home” coronavirus slogan with a “stay alert” message, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Sunday introduced the stages to lift that country’s lockdown amid the pandemic.The government-ordered lockdown, which began March 23, has significantly reduced the transmission of the virus in Britain. However, the daily death toll remains high, with 32,000 fatalities as of Sunday, for the most in Europe and the second-highest pandemic toll worldwide.Johnson, who returned to work two weeks ago following his hospitalization for the virus, announced in a prerecorded televised address some minor changes to the lockdown.Meanwhile, governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have already extended their lockdowns for another three weeks.Ahead of the speech, Johnson detailed the meaning of the new “stay alert” slogan as telling the public to “stay at home as much as possible,” to keep two meters (over 6 feet) apart “where possible” when going out, and to also limit their contact with other people.The leaders of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland said they would stick with the “stay at home” message. Up to now, the four nations of the U.K. have moved in lockstep on virus regulations.Among the changes:-Some workers will be permitted to return to their jobs-People will be allowed to exercise outside more than once a day-Garden centers will reopen-Everyone who flies into the U.K. will be required to quarantine for 14 days unless they are coming from IrelandJohnson said, “It would be madness to throw away that achievement by allowing a second spike,” regarding the country’s progress. “We must stay alert. We have been through the initial peak, but it is coming down the mountain that is often more dangerous.”last_img read more

Read More

TSA reports travelers left behind more than $900,000 at security checkpoints in 2019, TSA says

first_imgThe TSA has reported that travelers left more than $926,000 at security checkpoints in 2019.On Friday, the government agency released its annual report for the total of the nation’s 75 biggest airports, between October 2018 and September 2019.John F. Kennedy International in New York topped the list with passengers leaving $98,110 left in those grey bins. San Francisco, Miami, Las Vegas, and Dallas-Ft. Worth rounded out the top 5.The unclaimed money goes into a special federal aviation security fund, mostly used for training and promoting TSA PreCheck, according to a TSA report to Congress.last_img read more

Read More

Offensive-heavy lineup improves No. 5 Syracuse men’s soccer’s attack

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Kenny Lassiter avoided Hofstra defenders and passed a ball from the center of the field to the right toward Johannes Pieles, who controlled the ball with his right foot and shot it just wide of goal.One minute later, Chris Nanco managed to get a shot off at goal that also went wide. Even though neither went in, Syracuse managed to get off two quick shots in the first three minutes of the game.Against St. John’s on Sept. 4, the three Syracuse forwards had only spent one moment together on the field, and that was the one time SU was trailing in the game (and the only time all season). But in Tuesday night’s 1-0 win over Hofstra, all three started and it led to impressive results.“I thought we created enough chances during the run of play,” head coach Ian McIntyre said. “I think we played some of our best soccer tonight.”No. 5 Syracuse (6-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) has spent much of the early part of its season auditioning different players to solidify openings in the midfield, many of them natural defensive midfielders. But SU might have found its stronger lineup by dropping Nanco to attacking midfield, coupled with the return of an injured Sergio Camargo. Its offensive-heavy lineup should play a factor against No. 15 Boston College (4-1, 1-0) on Friday at 7 p.m. at SU Soccer Stadium.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPart of what made the Orange’s trio of attacking players so strong was its versatility. Nanco, Lassiter and Pieles all brought different elements — speed, strength, finesse — to the pitch and just as defenses neutralized one, another came on as a sub.That being said, playing all three of them together for a full game wasn’t going to be a sustainable plan for the future.Camargo’s return is what makes this lineup most feasible. The natural attacking midfielder dealt with a hamstring problem earlier in the season but is just now coming around.“There’s just so many things that he brings,” captain Liam Callahan said of Camargo. “It’s dangerous for the teams we’re playing against.”Camargo was the first sub on Tuesday night. He played 47 minutes while Lassiter and Pieles played 64 and 66, respectively. No other sub played more than nine minutes.Earlier in the season, McIntyre said how his midfielders needed to, and eventually would, get better on the ball in terms of controlling it and connecting passes. On Tuesday night, the first thing he said when crediting the success of the Orange’s new starting lineup was that it connected the extra pass.Syracuse managed 11 first-half shots, tied for the most in a game this season. Lassiter almost scored off a Nanco pass but Pride goalie Leonard Arkhanhelskyi made a leaping one-handed save to punch it out. Still, the constant pressure SU imposed was apparent.Playing more offensively minded midfielders means some resources are being pulled from the defense. But the SU back line isn’t concerned.“Obviously, someone could say that it’s a bit risky,” defender Louis Cross said. “But we’re confident in our ability as a back three, with Mo (Adams) there.”While Camargo’s presence might be the catalyst for this new lineup, it’s Adams’ that allows it to execute. The freshman has cemented his spot as the defensive midfielder, slowing down opponents before they even get to the back line of Cross, Miles Robinson and Kamal Miller.Nothing’s changed for the Orange in the record book. It was perfect before the lineup change and was still perfect after. But the balance provided by this new offensive-focused group could be what vaults SU to a higher level.“We’ve got some ways that we can change for our team as well as for opponents,” McIntyre said. “ … Tonight, I think it was a good step in the right direction.” Comments Published on September 14, 2016 at 11:47 pm Contact Tomer: tdlanger@syr.edu | @tomer_langercenter_img Related Stories Johannes Pieles’ late header pushes No. 5 Syracuse past Hofstra, 1-0Syracuse men’s soccer’s defense stars in 2nd straight shutoutlast_img read more

Read More